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Cheapest Petrol & Diesel Discussion Area

edited 15 June 2010 at 10:06AM in Motoring
630 replies 149.9K views
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  • WigWig Forumite
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    Crabman wrote: »
    I was under the impression that a direct injection fuel system cuts out when fuel isn't needed, e.g. down a hill in gear with foot off the accelerator?
    Ok, I don't know if going downhill *in gear* with foot off the clutch, if the ECU shuts off fuel alltogether - in some way it makes sense, in others it doesn't. However you were referring to a car coasting in neutral, in this case IMHO the fuel definately does not shut off.
    EDIT: Crabman. sorry I misread your earlier post, didn't see the "in gear" bit, thought you were referring to a car in neutral.



    About being in control, I think this has something to do with control in the event of an emergency, e.g. coasting in neutral you are relying solely on brakes in stopping, whereas in gear you can use engine braking too.
    It is in theory a back up system - yes - I agree, however as long as your engine continues to run (and why shouldn't it?) then your brakes will be capable of stopping you, especially so, as you would if you were doing this already have your foot on the brake pedal applying brake power as when it is needed - as I said earlier this wears down your brake pads.

    And even if your engine does stop, the reserve vaccum would be enough to stop the car.
  • WigWig Forumite
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    C32AMG wrote: »
    You're wrong on a couple of counts.
    No you're wrong
    I welcome you to join in the discussion on the Pistonheads forum with the various highly qualified private and police drivers who will explain in more detail the point I am making.
    I have no desire to join another forum, and if it is a "debate" then there are obviously people who agree with me.
    Secondly, modern cars will cut all fuel to the cylinders when in gear in a situation where the engine is under no load (ie, going down hill). (This is what the poster means by 'cutting out' - not the engine physically stopping.) If you coasted for say, 1 mile - you will use zero fuel over that mile. If you were in neutral, the car would be using fuel at a rate which is enough to keep the engine ticking over at the idle speed. So over the mile example, you would use a small amount of fuel. In addition, as you so rightly point out, you will also be harder on the brake pads.
    I misread what crabman wrote, I thought he meant when the car was in neutral - as you were the second person to bring this up I just read crabman again, and will edit my previous post to crabman accordingly.
    Hope this clarifies the points for you.
    It clarifies your opinion not mine.
  • Wig wrote: »
    No you're wrong


    I have no desire to join another forum, and if it is a "debate" then there are obviously people who agree with me.


    I misread what crabman wrote, I thought he meant when the car was in neutral - as you were the second person to bring this up I just read crabman again, and will edit my previous post to crabman accordingly.
    It clarifies your opinion not mine.

    Well, of course you are entitled to your opinion - If you wish to disagree with highly advanced drivers including police instructors then that is up to you, however I am assuming that you are at least at IAM standard in order to argue this.

    Regardless. If you are involved in an accident and you are found to have been coasting in neutral you will more than likely be prosecuted for dangerous driving - despite whether or not you feel you are in control. As I have mentioned, this is covered in the Highway Code and also under every Advanced driving scheme there is, including IAM and RoSPA. Using neutral to coast in an Advanced driving test would result in an instant failure. It is an example of poor driving ability.

    Noted re your earlier points regarding the brakes being able to stop the car, however keeping the car in gear is not purely about using or having the ability to use engine braking - it is about being able to power out of a situation if the need arises.

    As regards the second point, looking at your revised edit it would seem that you agree with my clarification of differing in fuel consumption between in-gear and neutral coasting.

    HTH.

    C32AMG

    (RoSPA Bronze, Silver & Gold)
    Savings - £18,500 @ 5.22% Average

  • WigWig Forumite
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    Thank you for allowing me to have my own opinion. In any event the way I always coast is to dip the clutch, the car remains in gear, I do this to avoid crunching the gears on re-selection which occurs quite often. So my time to re-power (should the need ever arise going down hill :)) would be the same as yours.
  • I have just filled up at my local Tesco PFS (Weston s Mare) and noticed that they are 2p per liter more expensive than Asda / Morrison's, I asked the cashier who explained that Tesco no longer operate the price match scheme, instead they have taken the position of leading the local pricing, "usually when we put our prices up in a few days the others will follow" explained the cashier, anyone else found this? can't see any mention of this on the Tesco web site.:confused:
  • CrabmanCrabman Forumite, Board Guide
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    Narked wrote: »
    I have just filled up at my local Tesco PFS (Weston s Mare) and noticed that they are 2p per liter more expensive than Asda / Morrison's, I asked the cashier who explained that Tesco no longer operate the price match scheme, instead they have taken the position of leading the local pricing, "usually when we put our prices up in a few days the others will follow" explained the cashier, anyone else found this? can't see any mention of this on the Tesco web site.:confused:
    That is what seems to be happening all over the country by the looks of things, it's almost like a reversed price war! :(
    I'm a Board Guide on the Savings & Investments, ISAs & Tax-free Savings, Public Transport & Cycling, Motoring and Parking Fines, Tickets & Parking Boards. I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. Board Guides are not moderators & don't read every post. If you spot a contentious or illegal post then please report it to [email protected] (it's not part of my role to deal with this). Views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com

  • WigWig Forumite
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    Tesco has always done this, even in the days when they had a petrol price match policy (which they ignored more often than not). Thanks for confirming Tesco no longer has a price match policy.

    I urge anyone who can, to avoid Tesco petrol for this reason, boycott them if for example there is an Asda nearby. Unfortunatly for us Tesco is the only budget supplier within 9 miles. and the Welsh Assembly overturned an approved planning proposal to give us a Morrisons on a disused brownfield site. 3 miles away from Tesco. Still, I try to fill up whenever I visit Cardiff, as it is always 2 - 3p cheaper there and I can fill at Morrisons or Asda.
  • anewmananewman Forumite
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    Wig wrote: »
    Still, I try to fill up whenever I visit Cardiff, as it is always 2 - 3p cheaper there and I can fill at Morrisons or Asda.

    I have always wondered why petrol is cheaper in Cardiff than most of the rest of Wales. Ok I know it will be something to do with supply and the level of demand and transport costs, but the cheapest petrol close to appartments that cost like quarter of a million, doesn't seem right. Surely the people there can afford to pay more for petrol.

    Heard an advert on the radio earlier about 5p off a litre petrol when spending £20 at somerfield or something. No doubt the petrol is more than 5p overpriced.
  • WigWig Forumite
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    Thanks for the heads up about somerfield, is that Somerfield own brand petrol? - I didn't know they had any petrol.

    Unfortunately Somerfield is slightly overpriced for groceries, so the £1 you save on petrol will be taken in extra grocery costs. It would be worth it if you need like 40 - 60 litres

    Newport is also cheap, as cheap or sometimes cheaper than Cardiff. I put it down to healthy competition, Outside Cardiff & Newport there isn't the space to have more competition and Tesco has already taken most of the small valley towns.
  • anewmananewman Forumite
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    Wig wrote: »
    Thanks for the heads up about somerfield, is that Somerfield own brand petrol? - I didn't know they had any petrol.
    I didn't catch the exact details, it was on a radio in a shop I went into so not even sure which radio station it was :( Sorry I'm no help at all there, but I guess if Somerfield is your thing and you know a store with a petrol station it could be worth checking out. Their own website is no help with no details of any offer, and only lets you search for stores with a car wash, not one's with a petrol station.
    Wig wrote: »
    Newport is also cheap, as cheap or sometimes cheaper than Cardiff. I put it down to healthy competition, Outside Cardiff & Newport there isn't the space to have more competition and Tesco has already taken most of the small valley towns.
    Other places that tend to be cheaper are Caerphilly Asda and Morissons. Also Rogerstone Morissons is generally among the cheapest.
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