renting from a private landlord.....

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  • AdrianCAdrianC Forumite
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    Oh, and there's no legal requirement for any electrical appliances to be PAT tested (the "stickers" you refer to), ever, in any circumstances - let alone in a private rental property.

    It really does sound as if your best bet is to move, if the place is so unsatisfactory in so many regards.
  • lease expires last day of august, and seriously thinking about that.
  • cattiecattie Forumite
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    Even when you buy a flat, the loft often isn't included as part of the sale, even if the only entrance to it is via your flat. So it's no good just assuming that as the loft hatch is in the flat that the landlord is renting out, that tenants have any rights over it unless it is specifically mentioned in the tenancy agreement.
    The bigger the bargain, the better I feel.

    I should mention that there's only one of me, don't confuse me with others of the same name.
  • My mate didn't have the loft mentioned in her tenancy agreement but she used it and was not charged. I feel it SHOULD come with the renting home.

    Could u ask to hav half the loft and he hav the over side?
    Yes I use txt speak
    GET OVER IT! :P
  • mgarl10024mgarl10024 Forumite
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    My mate didn't have the loft mentioned in her tenancy agreement but she used it and was not charged. I feel it SHOULD come with the renting home.

    When I first let out a house with a loft, the agent said that the loft was not included because unless it is boarded properly and safe you could get yourself into all sorts of insurance issues if the tenant injured themselves or fell through the roof, etc. As a result, easier to just keep the tenant out.

    Absolutely no proof of this - just what I was told at the time.
  • the main issue here, is that yes, i would love to use the loft for storage and if/when he empties it, can he charge me more for it.....the REAL issue is that i want to get some insulation there. the cold that comes down from that loft, is unbelievable
    and he is saying there is adequate insulation up there, (which i doubt) and refusing to let me do it. i qualify for it to be done free, at no cost to him. but never mind. put another duvet on.

    thanks everyone for all you advice.
  • theartfullodgertheartfullodger Forumite
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    Two points....

    a) Does "the property" include the loft? Suggest you buy the deeds from land registry & see if it does, or not...
    https://www.gov.uk/search-property-information-land-registry

    b) If so then, unless it is excluded in your tenancy agreement it is yours to use anyway: So write a firm, calm & polite letter to landlord (yes WRITE! - yes to landlord., copy agent, keep copy..) requiring him to remove stuff from your property (**). But expect a s21 by return...

    ** Yes it is your property - see...
    http://www.landlordlawblog.co.uk/2010/08/31/urban-myth-when-a-landlord-lets-a-property-its-still-his/
  • cattiecattie Forumite
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    You shouldn't have cold coming down from the loft, the point of insulation is to stop your heat from escaping into the loft. As heat rises, often the warmest point of a room is a ceiling.

    If you mean that you can feel a draught coming from the loft door, then cover the hatch by taping some bubble wrap or similar around it, which should solve the problem. Most roofs do need some ventilation to stop condensation forming, so even a excessively insulated loft will need some outside air to be allowed into it.
    The bigger the bargain, the better I feel.

    I should mention that there's only one of me, don't confuse me with others of the same name.
  • AdrianC. many thanks for that link. no report exists for my address.
  • theartfullodgertheartfullodger Forumite
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    cattie wrote: »
    You shouldn't have cold coming down from the loft, the point of insulation is to stop your heat from escaping into the loft. As heat rises, often the warmest point of a room is a ceiling......

    Errrr... Cold falls, heat rises: So if the loft is cold then that cold will come down... (& if you go up into the loft the heat from below will rise..)

    Insulation stops transmission of heat: Either way: (just as to keep frozen food cold, wrap it in a blanket..)..
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