change in working patterns

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Redundancy & Redundancy Planning
3 replies 1.2K views
jagr68jagr68 Forumite
8 Posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Redundancy & Redundancy Planning
Hi I currently work between 8.30 and 4.00 monday to friday term time only.
my employer want to put everyone on a 3 week rolling shift pattern between 7.00 am and 11.00pm including 2 out of 3 weekends. They are currently 52 of us doing my hours but they only want 20. can i refuse the new hours and claim redundancy or do i have to resign
Thanks for any help

Replies

  • dapastdapast Forumite
    42 Posts
    It depends on how long you have been there, more than 2 years really. If its in your contract that these are your hours of work then YOU as well as them need to agree to a change in contract, don't sign or agree to anything and the only options available to them will be leave u as is or make you redundant, what are they planing to do with the 32 members of staff they no longer want? If it's redundancy then can't you put yourself forward?
  • TBagpussTBagpuss Forumite
    9.5K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭
    What does your contract say? If it specifies your hours then they can't change them without your agreement. If it specifies the number of hours but states that the hours are allocated by the employer then it is more difficult.

    Don't resign. If they are cutting the number of workers they may ask for volunteers for redundancy. If you resign you would not be entitled to any redundancy pay.

    Are you in a union?

    Even if your contract allows them to change your hours, you could make an application for flexible working - the wmployer has to give this reasonable consideration and there are set rules about the reasons they can give for not agreeing.

    Of course, if you have been employed for less than 2 years you have very limited rights and the may simply end your contract if you do not agree the change.
    Check out the ACAS website for further information, also https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/hy_jobcontract.pdf
    All posts are my personal opinion, not formal advice Always get proper, professional advice (particularly about anything legal!)
  • killerkevkillerkev Forumite
    176 Posts
    I can't comment on your case but there is a large Supermarket (can't name them online) which is asking all workers for more flexibility with their hours (many have been on long term fixed contracts) and if they don't agree will be given 12 weeks notice
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