Will my wife get full pension?

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Pensions, Annuities & Retirement Planning
6 replies 922 views
SALOPMANSALOPMAN Forumite
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Just wondering in a nutshell will my wife get a full pension - looked on directgov website and seems she might - I know she has to be 66 before she gets it (Bday is 1954) but she worked from 16 to 25 then had 2 children - then went back to work did 7 years at one place and has just done 10 years somewhere else and she is 57 now. Will she qualify?? I read somewhere its now 30 years to qualify and some people get credits when off with childcare??
Better to light a candle than to curse the darkness. :beer:

Replies

  • dzug1dzug1 Forumite
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    She will probably qualify - but you don't give enough info to tell for certain. Did she pay full or reduced rate NI when working? And how long was the childcare period?

    You are right about the 30 years
  • SALOPMANSALOPMAN Forumite
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    She paid full stamp and she was off for 14 years for bringing up kids
    Better to light a candle than to curse the darkness. :beer:
  • Dark_StarDark_Star Forumite
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    Easiest way to check is to get a pension forecast:

    https://www.gov.uk/state-pension-statement

    Can do it all online too :D

    If you missed any years, you may able to "top up" contributions but I think this depends on lots of things.
    Lurking in a galaxy far far away...
  • jamesdjamesd Forumite
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    She should ask for a state pension statement. It's likely that she'll get a full basic state pension because that only takes 30 years. So:

    8 + 7 + 10 = 25 years so far

    She was probably also getting child benefit and hence credits for those years when not working. If not, she'll have more years she could work or could perhaps buy some past years.
  • margaretclaremargaretclare Forumite
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    SALOPMAN wrote: »
    She paid full stamp and she was off for 14 years for bringing up kids

    There was a thing called Home Responsibilities Protection, called something else now, which will have covered those 14 years.
    [FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Æ[/FONT]r ic wisdom funde, [FONT=Times New Roman, serif]æ[/FONT]r wear[FONT=Times New Roman, serif]ð[/FONT] ic eald.
    Before I found wisdom, I became old.
  • jackyannjackyann Forumite
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    Best to ask for a forecast - it takes awhile to come through.
    I do think your wife will be OK (similar age / work pattern to me, my only qualification for advising!)). Home Responsibilities Credit (I think it was called) began in 1978 - roughly when your wife stopped work. Initially I think it continued until the child was 16 - now it is 12 - but I think those crucial 14 years will be covered. That effectively means she has contributed or been credited from about 1970 until now.
    However, if she was working part-time for some of the years that may make a difference.
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