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Foraging Challenge

edited 22 July 2012 at 7:56PM in Old Style MoneySaving
375 replies 45.5K views
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Replies

  • jumblejackjumblejack Forumite
    6.6K posts
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    Goin collect my black currants in a mo as they are heaving.:j

    I am going to freeze them and then make a cordial for a nature's bounty home ed class in October. I know cordial can last months but I would consume it before then :rotfl:
    I want to make elderberry cordial too so can't wait for those as there are loads of trees around here.

    Wild Blackberry jam is on my to make list too as that will be great on home made bread for the class.

    Happy foraging folks :T
    :A Every moment is a gift. That's why we call it the present.!:A
    Grocery Spend Weekly Challenge (Sat-Fri):£30.50/£40
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User]
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    Eighth Anniversary 10,000 Posts I've been Money Tipped!
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    You can freeze the cordial too in plastic bottles, I do it with the elderflower I make to stop it fermenting. Make sure and leave room for the liquid to expand as it freezes, or the bottles split. It's one way of having cordials all year round. Lyn x.
  • jumblejackjumblejack Forumite
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    You can freeze the cordial too in plastic bottles, I do it with the elderflower I make to stop it fermenting. Make sure and leave room for the liquid to expand as it freezes, or the bottles split. It's one way of having cordials all year round. Lyn x.

    Inspired idea!!! I prefer to do that:T

    I'm chuffed. I've just harvested nearly 3lbs if fruit, mainly blackcurrants from the bushes in the garden. The gooseberries are nearly ready too but they've not done so well.

    Will upload picture later as I'm thrilled with the blackcurrants. I forgot they were even in the garden as I planted loads of cheapo reduced plants a few years ago that looked like they were dead from wilkos.

    I've never had blackcurrants other than a sample of ribena :rotfl: Can't wait to try it!

    I might make a couple of jams too. I have a bag of bramleys at the bottom of the fridge. Anyone got a good recipe?
    :A Every moment is a gift. That's why we call it the present.!:A
    Grocery Spend Weekly Challenge (Sat-Fri):£30.50/£40
  • jumblejackjumblejack Forumite
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    Just found this neat idea now my blackcurrant bush is harvested of currants......


    Blackcurrant Leaf Sorbet

    We also use this recipe to make an elderflower sorbet - substitute 4 or 5 elderflower heads in full bloom.

    2 large handfuls of young blackcurrant leaves
    8 ozs (225g /1 cup) sugar
    1 pint (600ml /2½ cups) cold water
    Juice of 3 lemons
    1 egg white (optional)

    Crush the blackcurrant (or the elder flower heads) leaves tightly in your hand, put into a stainless steel saucepan with the cold water and sugar. Stir to dissolve the sugar, bring slowly to the boil. Simmer for 2 or 3 minutes. Allow to cool completely. Add the juice of 3 freshly squeezed lemons. Strain.

    Make the sorbet in one of the following ways.

    Pour the juice into a stainless steel or plastic container and freeze for about 4-5 hours or until semi-frozen. Remove from the freezer and whisk until smooth, then return to the freezer. Whisk again when almost frozen and fold in one stiffly beaten egg white. Keep in the freezer until needed.

    If you have a food processor simply freeze the sorbet completely in a stainless steel or plastic bowl, then break into large pieces and whizz up in the food processor for a few seconds. Add one slightly beaten egg white, whizz again for another few seconds, then return to the bowl and freeze again until needed.

    Serve in chilled glasses or chilled white china bowls or on pretty plates lined with fresh blackcurrant leaves.

    This sorbet is naturally very pale but you could introduce some colour with a few crushed blackberries if you like.

    Elder flowers also make a delicious flavouring for gooseberries a bit like adding some Frontignan wine. Try it next time you make a gooseberry fool.
    :A Every moment is a gift. That's why we call it the present.!:A
    Grocery Spend Weekly Challenge (Sat-Fri):£30.50/£40
  • kerrypnkerrypn Forumite
    1.2K posts
    Think I found some St Johns Wort on my walk today :D

    Any ideas on what I can do with it?

    Jumblejack, I normally just add loads of sugar and a bit of cinnamon to bramley apples, dont know if cinnamon would go with blackcurrants though? Will be watching for blackcurrant recipes with interest as we have a bush in our garden too :cool:
  • Important update! We have recently reviewed and updated our Forum Rules and FAQs. Please take the time to familiarise yourself with the latest version.
  • rubytuesdayrubytuesday Forumite
    22.4K posts
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    Thought you might be interested in these Books really cheap with the Book people at the moment - plus free delivery and 10 per cent discount in codes and vouchers thread.

    I got them out of the library and they are really good.

    You can make tea with St Johns Wort.

    http://www.thebookpeople.co.uk/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/qs_product_tbp?storeId=10001&catalogId=10051&langId=100&productId=184753

    http://www.thebookpeople.co.uk/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/qs_category_tbp?categoryId=48155&sort=sales&cm_cr=No%2bCampaign-_-category%2blanding-_-bestselling-_-HG-_-view%2ball&storeId=10001&catalogId=10051&langId=100
    Here dead we lie because we did not choose
    To live and shame the land from which we sprung.
    Life, to be sure, is nothing much to lose,
    But young men think it is,
    And we were young.
    A E Housman
  • edited 22 July 2012 at 8:43AM
    jumblejackjumblejack Forumite
    6.6K posts
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    edited 22 July 2012 at 8:43AM
    Thanks rubytuesday. The second link has self sufficiency volume sets for a tenner that should be £100. I'm sooooooo tempted....

    Edit:
    I'm reading one of my favourite blogs and just discovered that wisteria flowers are very delicious and perfectly edible BUT NOT THE SEEDS!!!!!

    Wow! The stuff you can eat is virtually unlimited!!

    http://terrallectualism.wordpress.com/2011/04/15/wild-in-the-city-foraging-fridays-10/
    :A Every moment is a gift. That's why we call it the present.!:A
    Grocery Spend Weekly Challenge (Sat-Fri):£30.50/£40
  • jumblejackjumblejack Forumite
    6.6K posts
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    I picked up my icecream maker from a freecycler this afternoon and mentioned how lucky she was to have so much self heal in her lawn and she gave me some!!!! Whoop whoop:j:j
    :A Every moment is a gift. That's why we call it the present.!:A
    Grocery Spend Weekly Challenge (Sat-Fri):£30.50/£40
  • kerrypn wrote: »
    Think I found some St Johns Wort on my walk today :D

    Any ideas on what I can do with it?
    i can post pics of defo id if you want to make sure you have the right plant - you really need the perforated variety - so will need a mag glass or very good eyesight to make sure you have the right one

    but - please be careful with st john's wort - it's not recommended for long term "internal use" it's a great medicinal plant however - but best used for external uses only (unless you are very familar / knowledgeable about long term internal consumption techniques/ habits etc) - i only say this because long term use is not good for you at all and as it is primarily used to treat depression, dependencey becomes a big problem

    it is very good as an external treatment for sprains and to a lesser extent bruises ;)

    talking of external uses - i had to forage burdock the other day - when i got a really bad insect bite / sting (burdock is by far the best natural solution to swelling and pain from stings / bites) - just apply some crushed up leaves to the area infected (i over wrap with a teatowel to keep the leaves in place) burdock is one of the best healiong plants out there - (as long as it doesn't grow on your allotment - then you (i) start to really detest it - badly) :mad:;):D
    saving money by growing my own - much of which gets drunk
    made loads last year :beer:
  • kerrypnkerrypn Forumite
    1.2K posts
    Ooh yes please splodger that would be very helpful :D it had yellow flowers and little berries in the centre of them, I think it was st johns wort but your pics would be very helpful :D

    Thanks for the advice on it, I will see if about maybe making some kind of ointment then(with 3 children anything taht treats bruises and sprains is a good thing lol)
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