Legitimate claim?

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  • nohnoh Forumite
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    Where to start? .................
    ..........................

    The bank I was using was Lloyds TSB Classic account. I can't find the terms and conditions myself

    This means that the bank had the request from the vendor and okayed the transaction despite a lack of funds. They shouldn't have allowed it at all. That is my point.

    Your point is invalid.
    The T+Cs you agreed to allow unplanned overdrafts for which there is a charge.
    See page 12 paragraph 10.6 - 10.8 of your agreement.
    http://www.lloydstsb.com/media/lloydstsb2004/pdfs/personal_banking_terms_and_conditions2.pdf
  • dunstonhdunstonh Forumite
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    I have a Lloyds Classic account. Unless your account is marked 0S (nil strict) then there will be some discretion on small transactions that may take you slightly overdrawn.
    "Floor limits do not apply to certain types of debit card (such as Visa Electron and Solo), as these cards require authorisation for every transaction to prevent the cardholder becoming overdrawn."

    Neither of which apply to the debit card on the classic account.
    debit cards have a direct line to your bank (the chip and pin terminal)

    No they dont. There is some linking of systems to check for available balances but not all transactions or systems use it.
    They shouldn't have allowed it at all. That is my point.

    Yes they should.

    Tell Lloyds to put a zero strict limit on your account (assuming they have not done this already). Whilst this will remove the discretion on systems that check, it will not prevent under floor limit or authorisations due to pending transactions not earmarked against balance.
    I am an Independent Financial Adviser (IFA). The comments I make are just my opinion and are for discussion purposes only. They are not financial advice and you should not treat them as such. If you feel an area discussed may be relevant to you, then please seek advice from an Independent Financial Adviser local to you.
  • Where to start?

    The bank I was using was Lloyds TSB Classic account. I can't find the terms and conditions myself but at the time it was taken out I was 16 so terms and conditions didn't even enter my mind.
    I'm sure you will have been sent revised T's&C's numerous times since then - with each new debit card for example.

    Cheques are a far different matter. Cheques are a promise to pay, the principle is the same and debit cards were introduced to replace cheques using more modern technologydebit cards have a direct line to your bank (the chip and pin terminal) No they don't always - see dunstonh's post.which tell the vendor that the transaction is good to go or not. No funds = no sale. As much as I hate to quote wikipedia:

    "Floor limits do not apply to certain types of debit card (such as Visa Electron and Solo), as these cards require authorisation for every transaction to prevent the cardholder becoming overdrawn." Wikipedia is wrong. Lets be honest here who checks their information is correct ? Also with a Classic account you get a visa debit card not an Electron card.

    This means that the bank had the request from the vendor and okayed the transaction despite a lack of funds. They shouldn't have allowed it at all. That is my point.

    Once again please take heed of the comments posted on here else make the same mistakes again. It is definately not the banks responsibility to ensure you have sufficient funds in your account before making a debit card payment.
  • I'd need older terms and conditions to be able check what the terms and conditions were in play, November 7th is after my mistake. If the bank can't even tell a vendor if I have enough money or not then it is the bank dropping the ball. Am I to believe that they can't tell if I have money or if I am able to buy something? That is ridiculous. They are holding my money and know exactly how much I have. If I am not allowed an overdraft but I am allowed to go overdrawn anyway, it is blatant trapping by the bank for higher fees. If I am allowed to go overdrawn and this is stated this in the terms and conditions then they have given me an overdraft facility. I shouldn't be charged ridiculous fees for using it.

    No overdraft + no money = no sale.
    Simple.
  • nohnoh Forumite
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    The T+Cs in force when you went overdrawn were similar to the current ones concerning unarranged overdrafts.

    Whatever you think the bank should do is irrelevent. The agreement you entered into with them is what matters.
    If you ask them to refund the fees they may refund some as a gesture of goodwill but they have no obligation to do so.
  • Don't feed the troll - surely no-one is that stupid or ignorant.
  • I don't see how thoroughly arguing my point would make me stupid, ignorant or a troll. Lloyds could stop people getting in to trouble by putting a no overdraft clause, authorised or unauthorised (unless arranged), into their terms and conditions but they do not. I'm sure there are thousands more out there that have made the same mistake I did and were punished for believing they couldn't spend what they didn't have. That is unfair. With the technology they have available am I to believe that they can't check funds are available before a transaction is finalised?
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