Woodburner installed - thanks everyone for advice

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  • A._BadgerA._Badger Forumite
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    savemoney wrote: »
    I have a multi stove and no one has said to me I need to remove the grill to burn wood, we let ash go into ash tray and empty it daily, its not a huge ash tray and can be full after a good nights burning 8+ hours

    No one suggested you have to remove the firebars (which is what I assume you mean by 'griill'). But they aren't necessary when burning wood. On a Hunter (which as a locomotive style rocking grate) you just adjust it so the gaps are pretty much closed. On some other stoves you can entirely remove the grate, put a few inches of sand in the bottom and build your fire on that.

    Either way, the principle is to burn wood on a bed of its own ash. It's a great deal less hassle than coal, where if you don't empty the ash, you will ruin your firebars.
  • Hi Highrisk

    Sorry, not trolling you or trying to give smartass answers, but is the surround you have in the pictures by any chance a Valor Aztec surround in Travertine?

    If so, you are aware that they are not suitable for solid fuel. They are a wafer thin Travertine set on an aluminium honeycombe backboard. Travertine is a very fragile/chalky stone which has a lot of fillers in it. Any extreme heat source, eg , heat from a stove may/will crack it if not discolour the filler.

    I know they are on offer all over the place at the moment, I have one in my shop for £89 to clear. Just take into account, it wouldnt be warrantied for solid fuel, but if bought at a bargain price, it will do what you want it to do , but may not last as long as you hoped it may.
  • savemoneysavemoney Forumite
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    Sorry when I meant the grill I meant the bit where the fuel lies on, I do have some bars across though. Do you mean that I should let the ash build up and over the part where fuel (wood) sits on. Its first time I have heard of this and never told when I got the burner nor when installer told us how to get a fire going
  • savemoneysavemoney Forumite
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    I hope that wall doesn't get too hot. Mine can get quite warm but not hot, and tvs dont like having too much heat they generate enough of their own. Also as said logs are too close to log burner they get very hot, doesn't look like you got a lot of space either side for them. Maybe a log basket would be better. I got a good one from Tesco's a few years back and it wasnt a bad one either quite solid.
  • A._BadgerA._Badger Forumite
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    savemoney wrote: »
    Sorry when I meant the grill I meant the bit where the fuel lies on, I do have some bars across though. Do you mean that I should let the ash build up and over the part where fuel (wood) sits on. Its first time I have heard of this and never told when I got the burner nor when installer told us how to get a fire going

    It's pretty standard stuff about wood burning, savemoney - indeed, several people have mentioned it on this forum recently - I'm really surprised it wasn't in the handbook of your stove.

    It's a bit late at night to be digging out links to back what I say but here's the first hit I got

    http://www.stovesonline.co.uk/how-to-burn-wood.html

    If you Google around you'll find the same advice all over the place. It's to do with he different needs of wood against coal in terms of oxygen supply.

    Hope that's some help.
  • savemoneysavemoney Forumite
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    No I checked I still have it on pdf




    3.2. Lighting
    Figure 9
    - Slide the top air control (# B1) to the right. Open the
    lower spin wheel (# C1).
    - Lay firelighters or rolled up newspapers on the grate
    with a reasonable quantity, if necessary, of dry kindling
    wood. Place 2 or 3 small logs on top.
    - Light the newspaper or firelighters using a long taper
    and close the door (# A).
    - When the fire is burning fiercely, add further logs of a
    diameter up to 10 cms.
    - When the stove body is very hot, close the lower spin
    wheel (# C2).
    The burning rate can now be adjusted by moving the top
    air control to the left (# B1). Experience will show you
    which settings are best for your situation.
    Note :When the fire is lit for the first time, the stove may
    give off fumes from the new paint. This is normal but
    ensure the room is well ventilated during the first few
    hours of operation.

    3.3. Re-fuelling
    It is advisable to wait for the fire to be reduced to hot
    embers before re-loading. The door should also be
    opened slowly when re-loading.


    REMEMBER TO BURN SOLID FUEL CORRECTLY, AIR
    SHOULD BE ALLOWED TO FLOW FROM THE ASH
    PIT AREA THROUGH THE GRATE AND THROUGH
    THE FUEL. IF THE GRATE OR ASH PAN ARE
    CONGESTED, THE PERFORMANCE WILL BE
    EFFECTED.
    If burning solid fuel, always empty the ash pan at least
    once a day or whenever it is full of ashes. Never allow
    the ashpan to overfill allowing ash to be in contact with
    the underside of the grate. If this condition is allowed,
    the grate will wear out pre-maturely.

    A._Badger wrote: »
    It's pretty standard stuff about wood burning, savemoney - indeed, several people have mentioned it on this forum recently - I'm really surprised it wasn't in the handbook of your stove.

    It's a bit late at night to be digging out links to back what I say but here's the first hit I got

    http://www.stovesonline.co.uk/how-to-burn-wood.html

    If you Google around you'll find the same advice all over the place. It's to do with he different needs of wood against coal in terms of oxygen supply.

    Hope that's some help.
  • GloomendoomGloomendoom Forumite
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    savemoney wrote: »
    Sorry when I meant the grill I meant the bit where the fuel lies on, I do have some bars across though. Do you mean that I should let the ash build up and over the part where fuel (wood) sits on. Its first time I have heard of this and never told when I got the burner nor when installer told us how to get a fire going

    Yes. Just let the ash build up to a nice bed. My sitting room fire sits directly on the hearth and I don't clean it for months.

    I did my nut a couple of years ago when my mother came to visit and completely cleared out the fireplace. She thought she was doing me a favour.
  • savemoneysavemoney Forumite
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    Well never knew that and wasnt told. I do seem to recall reading some where to leave some ash in bit didnt think it meant let it top onto the top grill

    One thing I do get though is slight build up of tar on glass even though it suppose to say air wash. We clean it with barkeepers friend.
  • A._BadgerA._Badger Forumite
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    savemoney wrote: »
    No I checked I still have it on pdf




    3.2. Lighting
    Figure 9
    - Slide the top air control (# B1) to the right. Open the
    lower spin wheel (# C1).
    - Lay firelighters or rolled up newspapers on the grate
    with a reasonable quantity, if necessary, of dry kindling
    wood. Place 2 or 3 small logs on top.
    - Light the newspaper or firelighters using a long taper
    and close the door (# A).
    - When the fire is burning fiercely, add further logs of a
    diameter up to 10 cms.
    - When the stove body is very hot, close the lower spin
    wheel (# C2).
    The burning rate can now be adjusted by moving the top
    air control to the left (# B1). Experience will show you
    which settings are best for your situation.
    Note :When the fire is lit for the first time, the stove may
    give off fumes from the new paint. This is normal but
    ensure the room is well ventilated during the first few
    hours of operation.

    3.3. Re-fuelling
    It is advisable to wait for the fire to be reduced to hot
    embers before re-loading. The door should also be
    opened slowly when re-loading.


    REMEMBER TO BURN SOLID FUEL CORRECTLY, AIR
    SHOULD BE ALLOWED TO FLOW FROM THE ASH
    PIT AREA THROUGH THE GRATE AND THROUGH
    THE FUEL. IF THE GRATE OR ASH PAN ARE
    CONGESTED, THE PERFORMANCE WILL BE
    EFFECTED.
    If burning solid fuel, always empty the ash pan at least
    once a day or whenever it is full of ashes. Never allow
    the ashpan to overfill allowing ash to be in contact with
    the underside of the grate. If this condition is allowed,
    the grate will wear out pre-maturely.

    The problem arises because it fails to make a distinction between solid fuel (which means coal or smokeless coals) and wood.

    Users who don't know what 'solid fuel' means (assuming it includes wood - and why wouldn't they assume that?) will be misled.

    That last paragraph relates to the use of coal etc. For whatever reason, the maker doesn't include the correct advice about wood.
  • grahamc2003grahamc2003 Forumite
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    In today - but can't use it for 48 hours to let fire cement dry out. It cost £370 for stove, £230 for installation and £20 for CO1 detector. So glad after weeks, months of confusion. Wish I'd got this in last year but couldn't as was put off by sales crap about 2K flue liners....




    http://imageshack.us/g/847/62371649.jpg/


    Snap with the stove, an Aga little wenlock. Sheesh, I paid £500 4 years ago for mine, and I thopught they had gone up in price not down. My quote for installation was £3,450, (which included removal of old surround and fitting vents - which aren't needed with this stove btw - and a liner and making good), so £230 seems very cheap. Did that include the register plate? (I'm assuming you've got one!).

    The air control knob was unsatisfacory on mine - it just butted up, and didn't make an air tight seal. So the sellers sent me the updated designed knob (which is silver) and perfectly cuts off the air when closed, so watch out for that.

    I store my wood byt he side of the stove, and haven't had any disasters or smells yet - the sides don't get really hot like the top and the flue pipe, so best if wood isn't in contact with those bits. My main concern is that the wood stops a bit of the heat radiating into the room.

    The three bars at the front are removable - not sure whether they should be in or out for burning wood or coal - I just leave mine in all the time, but burn mainly wood with a little coal sometimes to extend the burning times.

    The ashes drop down into the pan, and when the pan gets full, the airflow to the wood/coal will be cut so much that the fire will go out, so I can't see how you can burn on a bed of ash with this model. It takes a couple of nights for the pan to fill with ash, unless you burn lots of paper/cardboard/books like I do just to get rid of the stuff when the ash can build up in one evening.
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