Heating Info!

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in LPG, Heating Oil, Solid & Other Fuels
13 replies 1.1K views
JoeyVegasJoeyVegas Forumite
4 Posts
I was chatting to somebody at work about our heating and it started a debate about when you should have it on.

Should you have your heating on at peak times, i.e for when you get up in the morning and when you are at home in the evening, so that the boiler has to raise the house temperature at each time...or.....leave it on all the time "topping up" keeping the house at a steady temperature.

In this circumstance lets assume you have an A-Rated combi boiler with a single control thermast in one room and manually adjustable radiators.

What do you guys think?

Should you heating be on for peak times or always? 13 votes

Peak Periods
69% 9 votes
All the Time "Topping up"
30% 4 votes
«1

Replies

  • PincherPincher
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    I think you should leave it on all the time until you see the next gas bill. Nothing like personal experience to drive the message home. I bet you never knew your wallet has nerve endings that can cause you pain. ;)
  • CardewCardew Forumite
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    This must have been covered a hundred times, often as a wind up. However as a new member ----

    Without question it is cheaper to have it timed.

    Firstly if it were cheaper to keep 'things' at a steady temperature rather than letting them cool down and then have to heat them up again, why not leave your kettle simmering 24/7. Same principle!

    Secondly - if you were to go away from your house for 2 years at a time would you leave the heating on at a steady temperature 'topping up' rather than it have to raise the temperature when you return?

    How about a year? A month? A week? A day? 12 hours? 1 hour? At what point do you think the laws of thermodynamics cease to apply?

    The longer your heating is off the more money you save.
  • Cardew, although I see what your saying it isn't the same as leaving a kettle on to simmer. The heating would go on and off, only cutting in when the temperature dropped below a set point.

    I didn't mean I would leave it on whilst I went away, I wouldn't do that if I was using it on timed.
  • tanithtanith Forumite
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    I shall be finding out when my next bill is due although we pay monthly by DD, as during that icy spell we left our heating on 24/7 which have never done before so I shall be able to see by the usage graphs wether it was more expensive or not. I'm sure it will be but I was suprised that when the heating was set at 15* most of the time the house stayed quite comfortable and the boiler was only coming on once or twice each hour for a few minutes.. we did turn up to 20* in the evenings for a couple of hours.. we shall see
    #6 of the SKI-ers Club :j

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  • suki1964suki1964 Forumite
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    JoeyVegas wrote: »
    Cardew, although I see what your saying it isn't the same as leaving a kettle on to simmer. The heating would go on and off, only cutting in when the temperature dropped below a set point.

    I didn't mean I would leave it on whilst I went away, I wouldn't do that if I was using it on timed.

    I think you have missed the point cardow makes on thermodynamics
  • edited 28 January 2011 at 3:56PM
    CardewCardew Forumite
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    edited 28 January 2011 at 3:56PM
    JoeyVegas wrote: »
    I didn't mean I would leave it on whilst I went away, I wouldn't do that if I was using it on timed.

    As said above, you have missed the point.

    I said this
    if you were to go away from your house for 2 years at a time would you leave the heating on at a steady temperature 'topping up' rather than it have to raise the temperature when you return?

    How about a year? A month? A week? A day? 12 hours? 1 hour? At what point do you think the laws of thermodynamics cease to apply?

    Heating in a house replaces the heat(energy) lost from the building.

    That heat loss depends on the difference in temperature inside the house and the temperature outside the house.(It is one of the laws of thermodynamics) That is why it costs more to keep your house temperature at 25C than 18C.

    Now your question is to ask if keeping the house at a steady temperature by 'topping up' or have it timed.

    So my question above asking you if going away for 2 years and keeping the house at a steady temperature during that time is cheaper(because it is cheaper than having to heat up when you return) is valid - even if the answer is obvious.

    Now at some point, be it a year/month/week/day or hour, for your 'steady temperature cheaper' theory to hold true the law of thermodynamics will cease to apply!!

    Take a house with a steady temperature set at 20C. There will be heat loss from the house at a certain rate. That rate will be determined by the differential between 20C and the outside temperature.

    If you have your heating on timed the house temperature might fall to, say, 16C. As explained above as soon as the temperature drops from 20C to 19C, 18C, 17C, to 16C then the house is losing less heat than it would at 20c because the differential between 19/18/17/16C and the outside temperature is lower.
  • edited 28 January 2011 at 4:10PM
    macmanmacman Forumite
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    edited 28 January 2011 at 4:10PM
    Like almost everyone who raises this hoary old issue, the OP doesn't make it clear what they are actually trying to achieve. To have the house at a more comfortable temp when you come in, or to save money? Two entirely different and contradictory aims.
    If you want the comfort, leave it on all day/night and pay the consequent higher bills.
    If you want to save money, use the timer/programmer.
    The solution for most of us is simply to adjust the timer/programmer to compensate for the colder ambient temps in winter, in order to ensure that the house has time to come up to a reasonable temp when they come in. Sadly this seems to be beyond many people, as was shown by the no. of people posting during the cold weather who couldn't seem to get their houses up to temp.
    No free lunch, and no free laptop ;)
  • suki1964suki1964 Forumite
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    Im forever messing about with the timer. Im lucky its a dial one with the wee pegs you push out for the times you want the CH on. means I can change it easily - daily if I need to.

    When it was minus 15 here during the cold snap - of course I needed to increase the times the heating was on, and indeed I set it to come on for a bit in the night to stop the boiler freezing ( in garage - everything froze) and now these last two or three days where the sun has actually popped out for a bit - Ive decreased the times its on. So it might need changing again in the next day or so - its no hardship.
  • macmanmacman Forumite
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    Get yourself a decent digital programmer (Honeywell CM907 or the wireless equivalent) and you never have to fiddle with those awkward pegs again.
    Not a big investment, and gives you far more control.
    No free lunch, and no free laptop ;)
  • suki1964suki1964 Forumite
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    macman wrote: »
    Get yourself a decent digital programmer (Honeywell CM907 or the wireless equivalent) and you never have to fiddle with those awkward pegs again.
    Not a big investment, and gives you far more control.

    Funny we were looking at getting a new one last year and unless you are talking BIG money - you cant do as many programmes as I want. I think right now mine is on and off about 8 times a day - more if it gets so cold at night


    It works, I know how to use it - if it aint broke dont fix it :D
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