Transporting a dead person.

1356

Replies

  • Savvy_SueSavvy_Sue Forumite
    44.3K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    bryanb wrote: »
    See the OP - No other relatives.
    yes I saw that. my point was that it helps, when arranging a funeral, to know what the person wants.

    I was surprised to find my parents wanted to be cremated, but knowing that I wouldn't dream of doing anything else. the OP knows the person concerned wants to be buried with their spouse: that's what should happen and now is a good time to work out how to make it happen.

    btw it makes sense to me that undertakers transport coffins in 'unmarked' estate cars: aren't there laws about how fast you can drive a hearse? or do they just do that as a mark of respect?
    Signature removed for peace of mind
  • ErrataErrata Forumite
    38.2K Posts
    10,000 Posts Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Not sure about speed limits for a hearse. I certainly know they do 50 down the by-pass, as I had to keep up.
    Undertakers use estate cars to transport bodies as they generally collect them from hospitals and residential homes and the constant appearance of hearses at these places would be upsetting to patients, visitors and residents.
    My office at the hospital was next to the mortuary; it was surprisingly busy.
    .................:)....I'm smiling because I have no idea what's going on ...:)
  • paulofessexpaulofessex Forumite
    1.7K Posts
    ✭✭✭
    Is it a myth then that a fee has to be paid to each LA of each County the bodies travels through
  • Savvy_SueSavvy_Sue Forumite
    44.3K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Errata wrote: »
    Not sure about speed limits for a hearse. I certainly know they do 50 down the by-pass, as I had to keep up.
    never had to drive behind one: I know we crawled out to the crem behind Dad but it was first day of heavy snow last year and a bit slippy! the minister said he would usually drive on ahead to be there before the body but we took him with us to reduce the number of cars on the road, very glad I was NOT driving that day!

    to the OP, allow plenty of time to get the body where you want it: if your relative should die at this time of year do not take the first free spot in the vicar's diary!

    how do they dig graves in this weather?
    Signature removed for peace of mind
  • FarwayFarway Forumite
    11K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Is it a myth then that a fee has to be paid to each LA of each County the bodies travels through

    I reckon so, how would any county know these days with motorways etc?
  • FarwayFarway Forumite
    11K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Savvy_Sue wrote: »
    how do they dig graves in this weather?

    With difficulty :D

    I know in past centuries some bodies remained unburied for a few months due to frozen ground, no doubt stored in church crypt or similar very cold place
  • paddedjohnpaddedjohn Forumite
    7.5K Posts
    Ninth Anniversary
    ✭✭✭✭
    Check out your local papers for a 'Man and a Van'. I would charge about £2/mile so about £400 in total. I may sound a bit blunt with my answer but i'm just being practical
    Be Alert..........Britain needs lerts.
  • 1jim1jim Forumite
    2.7K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭✭
    I would hire a van, transit type or smaller if possible and do the job yourself if you would be ok with it, ie not too upset/creaped out, but yes i would see if insurance company would pay for prep at local undertakers and funeral at other undertakers
  • I believe you do have to notify each county you pass through with the coffin with the route planned. We looked into sending my mum home to be buried, but the cost was staggering as it was 300+miles. I think you need dignity for the coffin and a local van man may be cheap, but remeber you are handling a bio-hazard.
    Starting again and working towards our new df life!
    A very proud forces wife
  • clairec79clairec79 Forumite
    2.5K Posts
    ✭✭✭✭
    As far as I was aware (and I stand to be corrected) anyone can transport a dead body.
    Undertakers and funeral directors are not necessary so I would imagine a cardboard coffin and an estate car would do.
    I think it's just the necessary paperwork that has to be in order.

    True, the funeral director asked my brother if they wished them to transport their son to the cemetary or if they wanted to take him in their own car (they wanted to go with him but for the funeral director to drive - so they went in the limo usually used for mourners)
This discussion has been closed.
Latest News and Guides