Are 24 month contracts really that bad?

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Mobiles
35 replies 7.9K views
24

Replies

  • Yes. I love my Nokia N900 on a two year contract, it has an awful lot more power behind it than the Blackberry, far more value for money than an iPhone too but is leaving a lot of iPhone lovers in a bit of denial right now.
  • SparciaMSparciaM Forumite
    586 Posts
    You have to look at what is important.

    Most contracts are 18 months now, so 24 is only 6 months longer - is that really a long time to wait? IMO, no.

    Majority of people whom argue against a 24 month contract is that they "want" a new phone sooner. I've had my same phone for nearly 2.5 years now and still happy with it.

    24 months does give you a better deal, but you have to make sure that you're happy paying that in 24 months time. Work out the cost difference between 18 and 24 and see if it's worth it. If you want a new phone every year, then 24 months won't be for you.
  • d.m_3d.m_3 Forumite
    152 Posts
    Whats the best thing baout the N900? It's multimedia capabilities right?? Or is it as strong as a business phone? I use my phone mainly for emails and calls, and the odd browse of the net to find thngs out but not leisurely.. im a business student and im pretty involved in the whole business thing, no time to game etc..

    on that basis, what d'you think?
  • d.m_3d.m_3 Forumite
    152 Posts
    SparciaM wrote: »
    You have to look at what is important.

    Most contracts are 18 months now, so 24 is only 6 months longer - is that really a long time to wait? IMO, no.

    Majority of people whom argue against a 24 month contract is that they "want" a new phone sooner. I've had my same phone for nearly 2.5 years now and still happy with it.

    24 months does give you a better deal, but you have to make sure that you're happy paying that in 24 months time. Work out the cost difference between 18 and 24 and see if it's worth it. If you want a new phone every year, then 24 months won't be for you.
    ive had a w800i for nearly 3 years, i think, or 4.. pretty sure its 3, and im still not fed up with it, im just missing out on a lot of conversations and information spread by not having a blackberry. a lot of my friends etc have bbm conversations about important matters and im missing out on it.

    24 months shouldnt be a problem though. ive negotiated what i think is a good deal, 1200 mins, 500 text (not a heavy txter and blackberry services will be my main for texting once im connected), and 500mb internet which should suffice, and the 9700 for free.. works oout pretty good and i got it directly thru orange no need to worry about cashback and that gibberish..
  • d.m wrote: »
    Whats the best thing baout the N900? It's multimedia capabilities right?? Or is it as strong as a business phone? I use my phone mainly for emails and calls, and the odd browse of the net to find thngs out but not leisurely.. im a business student and im pretty involved in the whole business thing, no time to game etc..

    on that basis, what d'you think?

    The N900 is almost an internet tablet which just happens to do phone calls too. Multimedia is fantastic but that is not why I got the phone. It is more about its online capabilities for me.

    Emails are handled with ease and push email is supported, meaning my desktop emails appear on my phone faster than they do on my inbox client as I use POP at home. The browser is important as it has Flash built in. That may not seem so important, but news websites in particular have an increasing amount of Flash news content that you cannot view on the Blackberry or iPhone.

    It has a far better keyboard making business work faster, and a document viewer so you can be sent those docs to read on the train. Built in wifi is very good for sending the documents from your home computer, as is the bluetooth if you need that.

    Multitasking is something pretty much almost exclusive to this type of phone too. You can have several applications running at once on the phone, and browsing the web is an absolute pleasure.

    I am delighted with this phone, and if you are a business user frequently squinting at the small screen of a Blackberry, you will be thanking me for saving headaches from this eventually. The N900 is still not as accepted by iPhone users (most are in denial how there can possibly be a handset more powerful than their most featured handset right now, which is far cheaper too), but the market for the 900 is vast and there is a massive demand for this phone currently.
  • Yes. I love my Nokia N900 on a two year contract, it has an awful lot more power behind it than the Blackberry, far more value for money than an iPhone too but is leaving a lot of iPhone lovers in a bit of denial right now.

    Hmmm, I think someone has new phone rose tinted specs on at the moment...Beyond flash, what else does it have over the particular strengths of say a 9700 and/or a 3GS?

    **edit**, ignore the above, I see you just posted a longer review.

    Still not convinced, give it time and maybe, but right now I'm a BB/iPhone fan.
  • Watcherman, I will say in fairness the 900 is so new (has not been available in the UK for more than a month yet and is not available direct from networks), so there are still bugs. Fortunately in my first hand experience, so far only one of the bugs affected me and I got around it. There is a firmware update due imminently that should solve these bugs, but for a phone as complex as this it is not unexpected.

    Blackberries seem far less featured. These phones are more email phones than anything else, with internet capability if you need it. There are plenty of other things they do but the raison d'etre is email when it comes to this phone.

    The iPhone is the handset I think has polarised people and almost plugged them into Apple's machine. There is a lot to credit to Apple. If they had not launched this phone, the smartphone market would be doddering along at a snail's pace. The iPhone's design is superb, and build quality is excellent.

    iPhone users are heavily restricted though, and if you get an iPhone you are plugged into the Apple machine. Jailbreaking may temporarily unplug you, but with each firmware update comes the cat and mouse locking game. You must have Windows or a Mac to upgrade firmware or upload songs, and that computer must have iTunes. I have a PC that dates well into the 1990's and can use that to transfer files across to my N900 where iTunes would not even install.

    Generally, although the iPhone is an iconic piece of technology, I would like to replace my own battery if it reaches the end of its useful life. I would like not to be dictated in what software I have on my computer if I want to send files to my phone. That's why I can acknowledge Apple's brilliance, but I can remember the downfalls of some massive names over the years who locked down equipment and tried to dictate to consumers.
  • d.m_3d.m_3 Forumite
    152 Posts
    Fair point(s) made in both posts City. Im a fan of Nokia's generally, when they do a good job, its normally a %$*%ing great one. I was al lfor the E55 then E72 (waitied for them from Feb 09, and Aug 09 respectively), then I saw that everyone was on the BB train. If nokia could have some sort of BBM integration it i'd have purchased the e72 a month ago. I think the N900 will catch on like the N95/96 did, but the markets fierce now compared to the N95 days, and theres a large market for each type of phone (business vs. multimedia vs sleek design, etc.)

    Will be interesting to see how it all plays out for the n900, but i think the market is somewhat different for all 3 phones, so you cant really compare them all, they all have a loyal fan base and will all thrive as mobile devices.
  • ACDeagACDeag Forumite
    739 Posts
    Part of the Furniture 500 Posts Combo Breaker
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    The more who take up 24 month contracts the more likely they will try to move us all to 3 year contracts, then where will it end (lifetime contracts)!
  • 5limJim5limJim Forumite
    422 Posts
    am intrigued by the n900 now, just wish it were available on networks apart from Vodafone
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