Are you ever embarassed by your money-saving ways?

edited 17 November 2009 at 8:32PM in Old Style MoneySaving
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  • leedleed Forumite
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    Bait it the geordie word for (pack) lunch usually taken to work. A lot of geordie words come from old Norse from when the Vikings invaded and bait apparently is derived from Old Norse beita, (‘food’ )
  • TrikerTriker Forumite
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    I saw some ready boiled eggs at the reduced stand at Asda tonight and thought of this thread :rotfl: I didn't buy them though, I bought the reduced free range eggs that I'll have to boil myself.:D
    DFW Nerd 267. DEBT FREE 11.06.08
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  • MrsE wrote: »
    So its a packed lunch:D
    Thank you:beer:

    Its quite amazing what different parts of the country call it....

    Here, the west coast of Scotland, its called a "piece"....

    When I was at school, it was a play piece :D, which we had at the first play time :D

    Now, at work, it has been shortened, to "piece"..... but because I work in a 24/7 office, we taken turns to have our break, therefore, we have "piece talks" every day, to work out who, goes for their break, when :D
    :rotfl::cool:
  • ceridwenceridwen
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    I went to a wedding this year, quite a small affair but there were still 6 tables for a sit down meal. At the end everyone was stuffed when they brought the cheese ad crackers out so it wasn't touched. There was chedder, edam stilton and brie in huge wedges on each table. I had a word with the groom (my uncle) and left with a huge amount of cheese which we ate over the next few days. I got a little ribbed upon leaving but the bride and groom were just happy it was being used after spending a small fortune on it! It was great i definitely wasn't embarrassed then.
    However i was recently discussing with a friend of mine how much we were spending on our children for christmas. We both have 3 children, she was saying she's going to spend about £140 on each child! I didn't like to say we were only spending £45 each on ours. I was a little embarrassed then!

    That reminded me of one of the social "rules" in my circle. "Bring to share" meals are pretty frequent and, even though anyone/everyone might turn up and does, the "rule" is that we all check out what is left over of the food at the end of the meal. Its also the norm for people to cater generously - which most people that come abide by.

    People take home any leftovers of what they brought themselves.

    Any food that they dont want to bother to take home is left for anyone else to pick up and take home - and people make a point of "throwing out a general shout of the fact that theres some left and will people help themselves". I dont think any is ever thrown away:D

    I guess there is an element of "redistribution" involved there too - as in people feeling temporarily broke would only bring enough food to cover "one stomachs worth" of food and those feeling flusher probably sometimes deliberately bring not just a generous quantity - but w..a...y.... too much:D. For instance, I tend to take about "1.5 persons worth = enough for one stomach and a little to spare for being generous". Feeling a bit flusher the other day - I took "3 stomachs worth" of food.
  • edited 15 November 2009 at 9:21AM
    ceridwenceridwen
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    edited 15 November 2009 at 9:21AM
    MrsE wrote: »
    Can we come a bit further south:confused:

    I don't know what bait or snap is:confused:

    But judging by the context I'm guessing snack?

    I believe its "packed lunch":D
  • We have to be very very careful about this money saving milarky.
    Yes I check out charity shops and buy most if not all my clothes from there (apart from underwear). Yes I shop in the whoopsies. I reuse, recycle, repaint, reknit...and yes, with the looming energy crisis we all need to avoid wasteful practices BUT..........what if EVERYONE did it?

    The supermarkets wouldn't stay open as nobody would buy their premium range. So we then couldn't get our stupidly-cheap-almost-as-good veg etc
    The big clothes chains would go bust because nobody is buying their expensive clothes.
    Charity shops would be in an interesting position, everybody wanting to buy there, but would we be giving clothes to them before they had worn out? Possibly not.

    So thank goodness there are some people out there prepared to buy expensive clothes and give them to charity shops for me to find.
    Hallelujah to the folk who line the coffers of the big supermarket chains.
    They might as well be passing on their money to us, because let's face it, we're the ones getting the benefit from their slapdash spending.
  • edited 15 November 2009 at 9:56AM
    ceridwenceridwen
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    edited 15 November 2009 at 9:56AM
    knithryn wrote: »
    We have to be very very careful about this money saving milarky.
    Yes I check out charity shops and buy most if not all my clothes from there (apart from underwear). Yes I shop in the whoopsies. I reuse, recycle, repaint, reknit...and yes, with the looming energy crisis we all need to avoid wasteful practices BUT..........what if EVERYONE did it?

    The supermarkets wouldn't stay open as nobody would buy their premium range. So we then couldn't get our stupidly-cheap-almost-as-good veg etc
    The big clothes chains would go bust because nobody is buying their expensive clothes.
    Charity shops would be in an interesting position, everybody wanting to buy there, but would we be giving clothes to them before they had worn out? Possibly not.

    So thank goodness there are some people out there prepared to buy expensive clothes and give them to charity shops for me to find.
    Hallelujah to the folk who line the coffers of the big supermarket chains.
    They might as well be passing on their money to us, because let's face it, we're the ones getting the benefit from their slapdash spending.

    Which does indeed raise some interesting points. I must confess that I had never thought of it like that until Aril raised this point in a post recently on another thread - ie that we are in effect able to live this way - because other people live the other way.

    It certainly raised a "train of thought" in my mind - as actually I think fewer and fewer people will be living the "other way" (ie the more profligate way)....

    - though there is an element of "deliberate counterbalancing" to take into account as well. I thought to myself the other day "now - all being well (fingers crossed) things are starting to look a bit easier financially to the extent that I can start saving AT LAST then I'd better make a deliberate policy of buying things that are better-quality (to encourage higher quality goods to be made)/buying Fairtrade/buying handmade/etc - in order to encourage the changes I wish to see happening...
  • I agreed with alot of the things on this about being more embarrassed about spending lots of money, or what you did in the past. I have recently qualified in my profession and when I think back to uni I get embarrassed about my non sensical attitude to money and angry that I am still paying it off! Why did I need £80 of Benefit make up and a £100 Coast dress to go to a uni ball I ask you, the irony is I have a much better time at work things these days with my Boots offer make up and my Primark clothes!! Over the last few years I have really gone from embarrassment to pride with Primark, ebay, offers etc and it is always the first thing I tell people when they compliment me.

    I can understand how some kids can be embarrased, I remember when I was at school the local supermarket would have a weekly leaflet of great offers, my friends all used to say they didn't need to look at it, they just looked in my lunch box :rotfl:Well I can laugh about it now! One of my earliest memories with my mum is when they had 1p coupons in the local paper for bread and milk :rotfl:

    But yeah these days I take pride in getting things cheap and I think more people are coming round to this way of thinking. There is nothing clever or smart about spending lots of money when you don't need to on food clothes or nights out, chances are your parents earned it for you or you are going to owe it out tomorrow!
    Debt Free Wannabe by 1 January 2016 :o


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  • mama67mama67 Forumite
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    Both my Ds's (14 & 11) are very good at trawling the internet when they want something and then also seeing if it will go thru Qu!dco to help with the postage costs.
    I pay with my card or paypal but if there is cashback they get that amount deducted from what they pay me (both have a monthly clothing allowance and make to make it work).
    Both also love going to rummage round carboot sales.

    They also know if there are certain branded products in the cupboard they must have been "on offer"
    2 adults, 2 boys (:footie: sports mad big eaters) (25 & 22)
    My mother always served up leftovers we never knew what the original meal was. - Tracey Ulman
  • edited 15 November 2009 at 5:04PM
    BronnieBronnie Forumite
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    edited 15 November 2009 at 5:04PM
    ceridwen wrote: »
    I believe its "packed lunch":D

    We used to call it 'carry-out' or 'carrying-out' (Liverpool), as in 'Save that last bit of cake for your dad's carrying-out'. Anyone else use that?

    I can't find any reference to the phrase anywhere on google now:confused:!!


    (Sorry, OP for diversion!)
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