SD and HD TV viewing advice

edited 8 March 2013 at 5:51PM in TV MoneySaving
62 replies 9.1K views
13567

Replies

  • deanosdeanos Forumite
    11.2K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Uniform Washer
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Panasonic are about the best plasmas you can get for the price, Pioneer are better but 3 times the price :eek:
  • I got a Sony 40 V4000 Full HD. It was £599 from M & S with a 5 year warranty

    The picture is superb much better than my old CRT! I intend to buy a Foxsat Humax box when I can afford it to take advantage of HD programmes.

    Go for it and enjoy.


    :T
  • deanos wrote: »
    Panasonic are about the best plasmas you can get for the price, Pioneer are better but 3 times the price :eek:

    No necessarily true...i paid £1200 for my Pioneer 428XD 12 months ago from Costco, and this is unarguably the best 42" plasma tv for SD viewing. Granted Pioneer cost more than Panasonic, but you can still get some good deals if you look around:A
  • Well as we are in the we love Plasma notice board, makro have the 42" samsung ps42a416c1dx for £399 plus VAT. Quite a good deal but it is one of the ones with the non front facing hidden speakers
  • InactiveInactive Forumite
    14.5K Posts
    ccsurvival wrote: »
    I would say that hitachis arent the most expensive, but not bargain basement. What I mean by bargain basement is your goodmans, albas and brands that you have never heard of but seem to be on great offers.

    .


    But, as I have said, Hitachi do not make TV's, they only put badges on other peoples stuff, they may well be the very same TV's as Alba, Goodmans etc., none of us know who actually makes them.
  • deanosdeanos Forumite
    11.2K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Uniform Washer
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    ccsurvival wrote: »
    Well as we are in the we love Plasma notice board, makro have the 42" samsung ps42a416c1dx for £399 plus VAT. Quite a good deal but it is one of the ones with the non front facing hidden speakers


    Samsung plasmas are not very good my dad & FIL have a Samsung plasma and its not a patch on my Panasonic
  • almillaralmillar Forumite
    8.6K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Photogenic Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭
    ccsurvival I think you've been talking to too many LCD salesmen, and some of the advice is a bit out of date.
    Plasma TVs use of electricity is quite dependant on the brightness of the picture - the brighter, the more power it uses. LCD has a light switched on at the back all the time so uses a constant amount. Plasma salesmen are known to say that if it's a moody film you're watching (with lots of dark scenes) the Plasma will use less. Saying plasmas use 'a lot more' is either a big exaggeration, or simply untrue.
    CRT screens suffer from screen burn too - that's why our computers have screensavers. LCDs don't suffer it at all. As said above, screen burn isn't really an issue for modern Plasma screens.
    As above, plasmas have better viewing angles (though LCD have caught up massively here).
    hundredk - SkyHD and FreesatHD HD channels are in 1080 and can be watched right now - as well as the games consoles and Blu-Ray you mention. I would consider a 720 set for 32" and below, and from 32" above I'd want 1080. This is the size where you can GENERALLY notice the difference, depending on source, viewing distance etc.
    HTH
  • leosayer39leosayer39 Forumite
    478 Posts
    almillar wrote: »
    hundredk - SkyHD and FreesatHD HD channels are in 1080 and can be watched right now

    Eh? Really?
    Dont you just love freshly congealed pigs blood, with a bit of fat in :D
  • aliEnRIKaliEnRIK Forumite
    17.7K Posts
    Part of the Furniture Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    leosayer39 wrote: »
    Eh? Really?

    Theyre in 1080i though NOT 1080P (And probably wont be for a LONG time)
    :idea:
  • coolagarrycoolagarry Forumite
    1.3K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭
    This is a recent 'Which' Report

    Differences between LCD and plasma TV

    LCD TV Liquid crystal display (LCD) TV screens come to life when light from behind the screen is shone through the television screen's matrix of tiny coloured liquid crystal cells. Signals control each cell, letting varying amounts of colour through, and a picture is built up.

    Plasma TV A plasma TV display is an array of tiny gas cells sandwiched between two sheets of glass. Each cell acts like a mini fluorescent tube, emitting ultraviolet light which then strikes red, green and blue spots on the screen. These spots glow to build a picture.

    Collectively the two technologies are often called flat-panel TVs.
    Screen size LCD TV now offers the widest-array of screen-sizes, but for many years huge 37-, 42- and even 50-inch plasma TVs were the only choice for fans of big-screen TV. Technology restricted LCD TVs to small portable sets and the 32-inch market.

    Today, it's a different story. Massive manufacturer investment in research and production has led to LCD TV screens becoming increasingly bigger. Many manufacturers have abandoned plasma altogether (such as Sony, Sharp, Toshiba), and LCD screens are now common in the 40-inch plus category.
    VERDICT LCD television
    Picture quality The very latest LCD TVs often have the edge over plasma

    The million-dollar question – which flat-panel TV technology actually looks better on the screen? There are a couple of general observations to be made; many LCD TVs don't do blacks well, so darker pictures can look washed out, and plasma TVs typically have wider viewing angles.
    But in reality the issue is less to do with the hardware and far more to do with the digital processing software inside the TV. Both LCD and plasma TVs have to upscale and de-interlace TV pictures, and instead of scanning them directly onto the screen like a CRT television, they store pictures and place them onto the TV screen a frame at a time.
    The quality of the digital processing software used to hide the side effects of all this, not the technology per se, will more often than not dictate the quality of the picture.
    Having said that, LCD TVs have the definite edge over plasmas in the rigorous Which? testing regime, and find most favour with our exacting viewing panel. However, if you take screen size into account, this is hardly surprising.
    A 26 to 32-inch screen is the optimal size for watching standard-definition material. Bigger screens tend to make digital processing side-effects more obvious. Conversely, bigger screens are more suited to high-definition. A 42-inch screen is more capable than a 26-inch set, for instance, of showing off the extra detail and sharpness of a HD picture.
    Considering most of us watch standard-definition TV, LCD is more often than not the technology of choice. In larger screen sizes, Sony and Toshiba LCDs vie with Panasonic and Pioneer plasmas for top spot.
    See detailed brand overviews for the lowdown on all the leading TV manufacturers.
    VERDICT LCD TV shades it
    I'm Glad to be here... At my age I'm glad to be anywhere!!
    I'm not losing my hair... I'm getting more head!!
This discussion has been closed.
Latest MSE News and Guides

Stoozing, sublets & summer sips

This week's MSE Forum highlights

MSE News

Martin Lewis quizzes Rishi Sunak

Watch the cost of living support Q&A here

Join the MSE Forum discussion

48 craft beers for £50 delivered

One-off bundle for newbies. Excludes Northern Ireland

MSE Deals