Quick Question - please!

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Insurance & Life Assurance
13 replies 918 views
x__Indigo_xx__Indigo_x Forumite
1.1K Posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Insurance & Life Assurance
hi i recently bought a laptop [ £300] at currys and was offered the extended warrenty thing..however i could not take it out that day as i didnt have my bank details so i aim to go back

however a friend of mine has said that i would be covered under my parents home insurance[ i still live at home!]... they have it but i am not sure what EXACTLY they have... also he said something about the sales of goods act...

could anyone [in simple terms explain] what/if anything the home insurance and the sales of goods act would cover


thank you so much :)
I am a full time Benefit and Money Adviser for a leading non profit charity and I LOVE my job <3
Comments posted on this forum do not reflect the views of my employer :)

Please note forum police I suffer from dyslexia so my spelling and grammar can be dreadful- sorry but I cant help it!
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Replies

  • and also would my parents have to do anything in order for it to be covered?
    I am a full time Benefit and Money Adviser for a leading non profit charity and I LOVE my job <3
    Comments posted on this forum do not reflect the views of my employer :)

    Please note forum police I suffer from dyslexia so my spelling and grammar can be dreadful- sorry but I cant help it!
  • QuentinQuentin Forumite
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    House insurance won't cover your laptop against breakdown/repairs (which is the point of extended warranties).
  • lisyloolisyloo Forumite
    27.2K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
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    House insurance coveres for perils like fire, flood, theft etc.
    If they have the optional extra of "accidental damage" on their policy then it would also cover for accidents, however for the small amount in question it may not be worth claiing because of loss of excess and rise in premiums.

    The Sales of Goods Act is part of your legal rights.
    So if the laptop fails on day one, you would be entitled to a repair or refund.
    Further down the line it becomes more hazy because it's not always totally clear what is a manufacturing defect or the item not being "fit for sale" as opposed to normal "wear and tear".

    A warrnaty will cover you for breakdown/repairs which house incurance will definitely NOT cover.
    You statutory rights (Sales of Goods Act) won't cover this either unless the item was unfit for purpose e.g. fails much earlier than expected.
    As to what is a reasonable period for each electrical part if open to debate.

    I got a TV repaired for free once after 13 months under SOGA after the warranty had expired, because I argued that this was not an acceptable timescales for the power unit to last, but it is a bit of a grey area because it depends what is "reasonable" for the part in question and of course how you have treated the item.
  • hmmm ok, so for a laptop 12 months should be reasonable SURELY they dont accept people to buy a laptop that will only last 12 months.....


    maybe i should get the insurance out with currys then....or are there any cheaper alternatives to £10 a month with currys?

    thank you for replying :):)
    I am a full time Benefit and Money Adviser for a leading non profit charity and I LOVE my job <3
    Comments posted on this forum do not reflect the views of my employer :)

    Please note forum police I suffer from dyslexia so my spelling and grammar can be dreadful- sorry but I cant help it!
  • Your house insurance will protect you from damage but not faults. The Sale of Goods act states that no matter what you buy it must be worth the money you paid for it. So it is reasonable to say that a Laptop should effectively last 5 years. If the product is out of the 12 months store guarentee they will generally refuse to fix it free of charge. They will direct you to their customer services department who will tell you to get an independant engineers report listing the faults and probable causes and the cost of repairs. Instead of contacting the customer services you need to contact DSGI Retail office directing you letter to the Company Secretary (at present her name is Helen Grantham and email address is [EMAIL="helen.grantham&#64;dsgiplc.com"][email protected][/EMAIL]. The address is DSG Retail Ltd, Maylands Avenue, Hemel Hempstead, Herts, HP2 7TG. I have just been through this and have just been offered a replacement laptop for my 18 month old one. You must also log your complaint with the trading standards.
  • QuentinQuentin Forumite
    40.4K Posts
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    You have given an example of your success after 18 months, but where does the 60 months (5 years) come from?
  • Hi Quentin. The 5 years was told to me by the Trading Standards when I registered my complaint with them.
  • QuentinQuentin Forumite
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    Fair enough!

    Though it seems unreasonable to expect, (say), the battery to last 5 years.
  • lisyloolisyloo Forumite
    27.2K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
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    I think it depends on the part.
    A mouse or fan might not be faulty if it doesn't last that long.
    So it depends on what it is.

    If you had a fuse go in your washing machine you wouldn't declare the whole thing faulty.

    I think 5 years would apply to major compenents.
  • My faulty parts were wi fi card, mother board and memory module board
This discussion has been closed.
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