Loft Insulation over CH & DHW pipes

I am just in the process of putting insulation in the loft above our utility room. 

I can get the first 100mm layer in between the joists which is below the CH and DHW pipes. There a lot of pipes.

My question is whether I am doing anything wrong by laying a further 170 mm over the top of the pipes. I myself admit I can't see any way around it, but equally I can't see much wrong with doing it that way.

Would appreciate any advice please. Many thanks


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  • justwhat
    justwhat Posts: 607
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    edited 30 January at 4:57PM
    are you going to floor the attic? (remember the insulation should not be compressed)
    if not just sling it on the top lol

  • MisterNick
    MisterNick Posts: 1,240
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    justwhat said:
    are you going to floor the attic? (remember the insulation should not be compressed)
    if not just sling it on the top lol

    I'm going to put some single boards on loft legs to help with access, but they won't go over the pipes. There's a lot of electric cables up there also, so i am trying to keep those on the surface. 

    Insulation isn't being compressed.

    Thanks for the reply 
  • grumbler
    grumbler Posts: 58,629
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    edited 30 January at 6:45PM
    Covering pipes is good for them.
    However, it's worth leaving some space around heavy-duty electric cables. The same applies to the low-voltage transformer for lights.
    Also, this flexible ventilation hose definitely needs attention unless it's disused.
  • MisterNick
    MisterNick Posts: 1,240
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    grumbler said:
    Covering pipes is good for them.
    However, it's worth leaving some space around heavy-duty electric cables. The same applies to the low-voltage transformer for lights.
    Also, this flexible ventilation hose definitely needs attention unless it's disused.
    Thanks Grumbler.
    I have some loft lids for the lights 
    Noted about the electric cables. I am trying to get those above the top level of the insulation. If there are any that I am worried about I will speak to the electrician who needs to come back anyway
    That extractor will be fixed. It's from the shower room, and is not currently used, but maybe in the future. I was going to get of the drain pipe and get a new piece of flexible tubing to run to the eaves where it discharges. the tubing will be above the top level of insulation. I did think about keeping the drain pipe and lifting it up with some 2x1s sitting on loft legs, but I think a flexible pipe would be better. Happy to be corrected.
    I don't like the way it comes up between two pipes but i think  will have to live with that as i don't think i condo it any other way
  • grumbler
    grumbler Posts: 58,629
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    edited 30 January at 9:31PM
    grumbler said:
    Covering pipes is good for them.
    However, it's worth leaving some space around heavy-duty electric cables. The same applies to the low-voltage transformer for lights.
    Also, this flexible ventilation hose definitely needs attention unless it's disused.

    That extractor will be fixed. It's from the shower room, and is not currently used, but maybe in the future. I was going to get of the drain pipe and get a new piece of flexible tubing to run to the eaves where it discharges. the tubing will be above the top level of insulation. I did think about keeping the drain pipe and lifting it up with some 2x1s sitting on loft legs, but I think a flexible pipe would be better. Happy to be corrected.
    I don't like the way it comes up between two pipes but i think  will have to live with that as i don't think i condo it any other way
    Long bits of flexible hose are best to be avoided - especially in a loft and especially above insulation. They restrict flow and  collect  condensate inside. Ideally, ducting has to have small slope down towards the eaves. A long plastic pipe is better and, if without a slope, has to be well insulated. Flexible insulated ducting/hose is available too.
    Not sure if it's doable, but between the pipes you can think of using a round to flat channel adapter

    and then either back to round or keep the channel flat.
  • MisterNick
    MisterNick Posts: 1,240
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    Thanks Grumbler, that looks as though I have options.
    Looking at Screwfix and that connector, I think the height would be 54mm which is below the height of the joist and therefore the pipes. There is then a 100mm rectangle extension, and then and then another converter back to circular. If ducting is the way to go I could partly do everything to the eaves, and the only bit of flexible hose I would need would be to join to the outlet. Sloping it is not a problem as I described earlier.
    The boiler is in that loft.
    I'll measure up tomorrow, but does that sound a plan?
  • grumbler
    grumbler Posts: 58,629
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    edited 30 January at 10:56PM
    Not sure I fully understand the plan, but I see
    +


    Manrose Round to Rectangular Connector Elbow 90 Bend Adaptor White 100mm -  Screwfix

    And you'll need a short piece of flat 110mm (?) channel to connect them together.
    Not sure about the size - it says 100mm for the adaptors, but for a similar 100mm flat connector it says W x D x Lg: 113 x 75 x 57mm
    You can buy parts at SF, play with them and return back if this doesn't work.
    Alternatively it can be Manrose Rectangular 90 Vertical Bend White 100mm - Screwfix and rectangular channel to the eaves.

    ETA: failing that, you can cut out a longish piece of the left copper pipe (including two bends), turn it 180 degrees and reconnect back with two compression joints. This will make the gap between two pipes much bigger.
  • MisterNick
    MisterNick Posts: 1,240
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    I was going by the SF products and thinking;
    1. second item in your latest post. Comes out of the ceiling, is 75mm deep (so should fit under the pipes.
    2. an adapter, or possibly 2. See below
    3. second item in your post above to get back to round. Lay so that the round part is facing upwards.
    4. attach some flexible hose to join to the ducting tube
    The rest is then in place to exit via the eaves.

    https://www.screwfix.com/p/manrose-rectangular-flat-channel-connector-white-100mm/13946

    I'm not sure how you convert the link to a picture as you have done.

    That was my thinking, but would appreciate input.

    Many thanks for your replies
  • Would replacing the plastic ventilation pipe with a foil-backed version help migrate the condensation issue?
  • MisterNick
    MisterNick Posts: 1,240
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    Would replacing the plastic ventilation pipe with a foil-backed version help migrate the condensation issue?
    Moneysaver, I wasn't sure whether that was for me or a general question. Condensation isn't likely too be a problem in this loft (although I could eat my words. It's over the garage and utility room and the boiler is up there. I am not sure of the answer to the question though
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