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Are larger houses just cheaper than usual atm, per square meter compared to smaller ones?

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Comments

  • Albermarle said:  
    Yes that is what I meant.

    So despite there being less demand for bigger more expensive homes, developers build disproportionately more of them. So increasing the shortage of smaller more affordable homes....
    This is not really the case. It is widely recognised that in the UK that house builders, to save costs and boost profits, are generally focusing on building houses that are too small by international standards...
    https://www.theguardian.com/global/shortcuts/2012/may/16/architecture-housing
    Room sizes are now on average smaller...
    https://www.labcwarranty.co.uk/news-blog/are-britain-s-houses-getting-smaller-new-data
    Some people on this thread seem to argue that space (room size) doesn't matter. It does if you want to be able do things without tripping over each other, have adequate storage, kids play with toys, exercise, work at home, have friends visit etc. And when you're elderly having space for mobility adaptations and care equipment can be important. 
    What does this mean if you're a buyer? Because of the UK's obsession with room number rather than total floor area you can get better value from your purchase by carefully checking floor plans. You might be able to find that some properties within your budget have substantially more space than others that are priced similarly.


  • bobster2 said:
    Albermarle said:  
    Yes that is what I meant.

    So despite there being less demand for bigger more expensive homes, developers build disproportionately more of them. So increasing the shortage of smaller more affordable homes....
    This is not really the case. It is widely recognised that in the UK that house builders, to save costs and boost profits, are generally focusing on building houses that are too small by international standards...
    https://www.theguardian.com/global/shortcuts/2012/may/16/architecture-housing
    Room sizes are now on average smaller...
    https://www.labcwarranty.co.uk/news-blog/are-britain-s-houses-getting-smaller-new-data
    Some people on this thread seem to argue that space (room size) doesn't matter. It does if you want to be able do things without tripping over each other, have adequate storage, kids play with toys, exercise, work at home, have friends visit etc. And when you're elderly having space for mobility adaptations and care equipment can be important. 
    What does this mean if you're a buyer? Because of the UK's obsession with room number rather than total floor area you can get better value from your purchase by carefully checking floor plans. You might be able to find that some properties within your budget have substantially more space than others that are priced similarly.


    Right, I think it's silly. What I'm worried about is if people suddenly decide to start caring about room size more after I sell a very large house,as I will lose a lot of money If I could hold on for a bit longer. I can't imagine would suddenly change this though.
  • Ditzy_Mitzy
    Ditzy_Mitzy Posts: 1,851 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper Photogenic
    spoovy said:
    A large car is not twice the price of a car half it's size, because it's not twice as useful -- it can still only be in one place at a time.
    Same with houses.
    But a fast car can be well over twice the price and still can only be in one place at a time. 
    Unless it's a DeLorean...

    There's also the consideration that larger houses will create issues which are off putting to many; they can be significantly more expensive to run, take more time and effort to clean and cost more to maintain on the basis of having greater amounts of everything!  They also require more furniture and decorating.
  • spoovy said:
    A large car is not twice the price of a car half it's size, because it's not twice as useful -- it can still only be in one place at a time.
    Same with houses.
    But a fast car can be well over twice the price and still can only be in one place at a time. 
    Unless it's a DeLorean...

    There's also the consideration that larger houses will create issues which are off putting to many; they can be significantly more expensive to run, take more time and effort to clean and cost more to maintain on the basis of having greater amounts of everything!  They also require more furniture and decorating.
    Right we can just not use one of the rooms until possibly wanted at a later date. Or just dont touch 25% of each room, can keep a dirty corner there haha.
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