Something to protect items going on a damp floor?

I'm aware the perfect answer, like for any issue, is to get the issue properly resolved. Don't have the money to be spending on this area right now so in the meantime...

At the back/side of our kitchen is a bit of a large cupboard/pantry thing. The floor & lower section of the exterior wall is damp. Opposite the exterior wall is a wall that just backs on to where we keep the fridge on the other side of it. The back of this cupboard is the underside of the stairs. Some people on our street actually knock through this entire area to have a walkway from the front door right in to the kitchen.



Just some tubs kept on the floor right now. From time to time a load of sandy like substance appears on the floor. Not sure what that is. And those cracks where floor meets wall - you'll hoover up loose stuff from there too & it'll eventually be replaced with more loose stuff somewhere down the line.

Anyway I was thinking of laying something down on the floor but I guess so it can still breathe & stuff can sit on top of whatever is put down there.

Problem is, I'm not sure what's on the market. I can't think of any product off the top of my head so I'm using random terms which are returning nothing.



Side note - what would be the 'proper' way to sort this? I'm going to guess floor & exterior wall need tanking but question here is, from having elsewhere in the house tanked I know you're not supposed to have a break in the tanking, so how would they properly tank with the electric meter being there on the exterior wall & the consumer unit being at the back (though that's an interior wall)?

Comments

  • Nobbie1967
    Nobbie1967 Posts: 1,447
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    What about self leveling compound? I used it in an old coal shed attached to the house which had a rough, dusty concrete floor without a damp membrane and it’s worked really well to keep it tidy.
  • grumbler
    grumbler Posts: 58,629
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  • B0bbyEwing
    B0bbyEwing Posts: 1,176
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    What about self leveling compound? I used it in an old coal shed attached to the house which had a rough, dusty concrete floor without a damp membrane and it’s worked really well to keep it tidy.
    Fliping heck! I've even helped someone use that in the past too! 

    Sure would give a nice smooth finish but how would it go with the damp side of things? 

    Plus then there's still the damp on the wall. I know that wasn't my main question but while I'm here asking I may as well educate myself on that too. 

    grumbler said:
      
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    I assume that's a plastic grid of sorts. Will have a gander. Thanks. 
  • FreeBear
    FreeBear Posts: 14,257
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    B0bbyEwing said: Side note - what would be the 'proper' way to sort this? I'm going to guess floor & exterior wall need tanking but question here is, from having elsewhere in the house tanked I know you're not supposed to have a break in the tanking, so how would they properly tank with the electric meter being there on the exterior wall & the consumer unit being at the back (though that's an interior wall)?
    I'm guessing this is an older property, perhaps with solid brick walls ?
    The proper way of fixing this would be to find the source of the damp. So check outside and make sure the ground levels are 75-150mm below the DPC. Consider installing a french drain around the outside (just a shallow trench filled with a decorative gravel).
    Tanking will rarely cure damp. If anything, it will just be pushed further up the wall, and you'll be repeating the same exercise in another 5 or 10 years time. Same for dumping a load of self leveling compound on the floor. If the damp is coming up through the floor, any cement product will just push the damp in to the walls and cause yet more problems.

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  • frugalmacdugal
    frugalmacdugal Posts: 10,077
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    Hi,
    one or two of these should do the job.

  • B0bbyEwing
    B0bbyEwing Posts: 1,176
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    FreeBear said:
    B0bbyEwing said: Side note - what would be the 'proper' way to sort this? I'm going to guess floor & exterior wall need tanking but question here is, from having elsewhere in the house tanked I know you're not supposed to have a break in the tanking, so how would they properly tank with the electric meter being there on the exterior wall & the consumer unit being at the back (though that's an interior wall)?
    I'm guessing this is an older property, perhaps with solid brick walls ?
    The proper way of fixing this would be to find the source of the damp. So check outside and make sure the ground levels are 75-150mm below the DPC. Consider installing a french drain around the outside (just a shallow trench filled with a decorative gravel).
    Tanking will rarely cure damp. If anything, it will just be pushed further up the wall, and you'll be repeating the same exercise in another 5 or 10 years time. Same for dumping a load of self leveling compound on the floor. If the damp is coming up through the floor, any cement product will just push the damp in to the walls and cause yet more problems.

    1930s house. 

    Not sure what you mean by solid brick (& no that's not me being difficult in case anyone thinks so). When you say solid brick are you meaning as opposed to perforated brick or do you mean no cavity or something else entirely? Regards the cavity situation, the front of the house & party wall certainly have a cavity. As for the side of the house that doesn't connect on to anything - I've no idea but would one be built where one wall is left cavity-less?

    Mildly off topic - in the extension we had damp appearing on the side wall (that is on our joining neighbours side but this wall doesn't join to anything) & couldn't understand it. Anyway, story short, there's a 10 inch gap between the wall & the fence & all the cats on the street were using it as a litter tray so 101 plant pots were thrown down the side to stop them. 
    Remove the plant pots & the damp has gone. 

    But no idea on the other side of the wall in the photo - it's just paviours. I'd need to have a check to see if that ground has been built up & therefore the paviours are higher than the floor in this cupboard/pantry.

    Regards tanking not curing damp - we've had our living room tanked. I remember them using Sovereign products, anti sulphate washes, slurry brushed on different ways over different days & whatever else. 

    Anyway, there's no visible signs of damp coming through now. While the cause of that damp cannot be 'cured', the unsightly visible effects have been managed. 

    Hi,
    one or two of these should do the job.

    Pallets certainly would tick the box. 

    Though I'm not looking to build things up quite so high. 

    I actually could get my hands on pallets but I think at the moment grumbler's suggestion looks favourite. 

    Thanks all the same though.
  • stuart45
    stuart45 Posts: 3,823
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    edited 26 October 2023 at 7:43AM
    FreeBear said:
    B0bbyEwing said: Side note - what would be the 'proper' way to sort this? I'm going to guess floor & exterior wall need tanking but question here is, from having elsewhere in the house tanked I know you're not supposed to have a break in the tanking, so how would they properly tank with the electric meter being there on the exterior wall & the consumer unit being at the back (though that's an interior wall)?
    I'm guessing this is an older property, perhaps with solid brick walls ?
    The proper way of fixing this would be to find the source of the damp. So check outside and make sure the ground levels are 75-150mm below the DPC. Consider installing a french drain around the outside (just a shallow trench filled with a decorative gravel).
    Tanking will rarely cure damp. If anything, it will just be pushed further up the wall, and you'll be repeating the same exercise in another 5 or 10 years time. Same for dumping a load of self leveling compound on the floor. If the damp is coming up through the floor, any cement product will just push the damp in to the walls and cause yet more problems.

    1930s house. 

    Not sure what you mean by solid brick (& no that's not me being difficult in case anyone thinks so). When you say solid brick are you meaning as opposed to perforated brick or do you mean no cavity or something else entirely? Regards the cavity situation, the front of the house & party wall certainly have a cavity. As for the side of the house that doesn't connect on to anything - I've no idea but would one be built where one wall is left cavity-less?


    What FreeBear means by a solid wall is a 9 inch brick wall without a cavity. The party walls of houses built in that period were often solid, with the exterior walls cavity. Solid walls were also used in passageways between houses when covered by an arch and upper floors.
    Looks like you've got a lot of mould which is a sign.of condensation, quite common in old cupboards. The sand you keep finding is probably the lime or cement plaster braking down. Cavity walls are often damp at the base caused by debris in the cavity.
  • B0bbyEwing
    B0bbyEwing Posts: 1,176
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    stuart45 said:
    FreeBear said:
    B0bbyEwing said: Side note - what would be the 'proper' way to sort this? I'm going to guess floor & exterior wall need tanking but question here is, from having elsewhere in the house tanked I know you're not supposed to have a break in the tanking, so how would they properly tank with the electric meter being there on the exterior wall & the consumer unit being at the back (though that's an interior wall)?
    I'm guessing this is an older property, perhaps with solid brick walls ?
    The proper way of fixing this would be to find the source of the damp. So check outside and make sure the ground levels are 75-150mm below the DPC. Consider installing a french drain around the outside (just a shallow trench filled with a decorative gravel).
    Tanking will rarely cure damp. If anything, it will just be pushed further up the wall, and you'll be repeating the same exercise in another 5 or 10 years time. Same for dumping a load of self leveling compound on the floor. If the damp is coming up through the floor, any cement product will just push the damp in to the walls and cause yet more problems.

    1930s house. 

    Not sure what you mean by solid brick (& no that's not me being difficult in case anyone thinks so). When you say solid brick are you meaning as opposed to perforated brick or do you mean no cavity or something else entirely? Regards the cavity situation, the front of the house & party wall certainly have a cavity. As for the side of the house that doesn't connect on to anything - I've no idea but would one be built where one wall is left cavity-less?


    What FreeBear means by a solid wall is a 9 inch brick wall without a cavity. The party walls of houses built in that period were often solid, with the exterior walls cavity. Solid walls were also used in passageways between houses when covered by an arch and upper floors.
    Looks like you've got a lot of mould which is a sign.of condensation, quite common in old cupboards. The sand you keep finding is probably the lime or cement plaster braking down. Cavity walls are often damp at the base caused by debris in the cavity.
    I suspect the party wall is cavity since this was drilled in to from both sides (neighbours had theirs injected as well as tanked - same as us) & neither of us found a drill bit coming through our side. 

    Debris - I know the front of the house got pumped with 'cotton wool' by the previous owner (in other words they had some kind of insulation pumped in there which I've later learned while intending to be good may produce negative results).


    Regards tanking & the comment of it sends the damp elsewhere, I was wondering where it could send it....

    The other side of the wall goes in to the hall - which itself is tanked all the way round to the front door.
    And the other end of this wall connects to a side door on the house. 

    So I would imagine that the damp would stop there. The only other directions are up & down. Allegedly damp doesn't go over 1.5mtr anyway (though how accurate that is I'd suspect probably not very) which leaves the floor.
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