Assistant buy car

Erm hopefully this right spot and please don't laugh at my needs 


Am thinking about buying new car which can help me with the following - what cars can meet requirements around 15k - yes I used search online but I like getting people opinions on this forum 

Parking assistant ( I struggle to judge gaps 😅,) 

I heard over reving can consume petrol or stoping multiple times- if I get automatic will this help or is there a feature were car will use the required power to move or like stop n start feature? when am stuck in traffic the consistent pedal action cramps my foot llol 


Windscreen feature can support with not being dazed by the sun or car headlights it makes me feel 🤢

Want car as eco friendly as possible. Heard hybrid good option 

Tyre pressure thing or warning it low 

Comments

  • fatbelly
    fatbelly Posts: 20,197
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    Golf, Fiesta, 3008 can all have Park Assist as an option
  • Goudy
    Goudy Posts: 1,416
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    edited 21 September 2023 at 8:53AM
    Full Park Assist or Advanced Park Assist (that park for you) is often an optional extra on a lot of cars, so you would have to specifically search for that option on most makes and models.
    You might struggle to find a car with this on your budget, though there will be some 

    Parking sensors, rear or front and rear (that pings to warn you, but can often be called Park Assist) have been pretty common on most makes and models for a while with perhaps the exception of the very base models and rear facing cameras have been pretty common for the last few years.
    You shouldn't have too much trouble finding a make/model in your budget with these.

    There are different types of automatic gearboxes available, some drive better than others, some are more reliable and eco friendly than others.
    Generally the old torque convertor auto is only usually available on bigger engine cars and aren't that efficient.
    Dual Clutch systems generally drive really well are are more efficient that the torque convertors.
    CVT don't drive as well but are usually very robust and really efficient, they are often mated to hybrids.
    Automated manuals are pretty horrid to drive, they don't creep which makes the likes of parking rather awkward. You really need to drive them two footed when parking, one on the accelerator and the other on the brake.

    If you can make do with parking sensors and perhaps a rear camera for parking and really want something efficient, perhaps a Toyota hybrid might suit.
    The Yaris, Auris and Corolla Hybrid are all virtually the same under the skin, they are really quite efficient.
    They all have a CVT automatic gearbox but it's Toyota own planetary gear system mated to a couple of electric motor/generators.
    They can sound a bit noisy if you drive them hard but there are generally quiet and smooth in normal driving condition.
    Toyota Hybrids are generally super reliable and can often handle interstellar mileages with easy. 




  • 400ixl
    400ixl Posts: 2,602
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    Sounds like you want a car with the auto hold feature as well. When you stop it automatically applies the electronic handbrake. This stays on and you can take your foot off of all pedals (In an auto). When you press the throttle it releases the brake. Some call it auto hill hold.

    Windscreen issue, that is a case of finding a car with fold down blinds that work for you. For behind then auto tinting rear view and wing mirrors would be of help.
  • Goudy
    Goudy Posts: 1,416
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    edited 21 September 2023 at 8:52AM
    400ixl said:
    Sounds like you want a car with the auto hold feature as well. When you stop it automatically applies the electronic handbrake. This stays on and you can take your foot off of all pedals (In an auto). When you press the throttle it releases the brake. Some call it auto hill hold.

    Windscreen issue, that is a case of finding a car with fold down blinds that work for you. For behind then auto tinting rear view and wing mirrors would be of help.
    Auto hold and hill hold are similar and often you have both but usually hill hold will only hold the brakes on for a few seconds if the car detects it's on an incline and can work with manuals as well as autos.
    So you can hold the car on the brake and have a few seconds to move your foot to the accelerator without it rolling back when it's time to pull away.
    It's built into the car so there's usually no switching it on and off.

    Auto hold will, as suggested holds the brakes on automatically and indefinitely until you press the accelerator.
    So you come to a stop on the brakes, take your foot off the brake pedal and it will hold the brakes on, either on the flat or on a hill until you press the accelerator.
    This tends to be fitted to autos only with electronic handbrakes and is usually selectable, so you can turn if off.
    Turning it off will not turn off the hill hold function, that will still work as described on inclines.
  • Wow so much information. This is seriously more than I expected. Something I may need clarification on but I come back to that later 


    Regards to buying a car . Is possible to do buy know pay later or use credit card for 24 to 34 month buy now pay later?  Or is monthly payments only option?  

    As I could potentially increase my car budget if on buy now pay later . 

    Any advice on this matter to would be appreciated 





  • Goudy
    Goudy Posts: 1,416
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    edited 22 September 2023 at 6:11AM
    There are various ways to purchase a car.

    Pay cash for the whole amount.

    Personal loan from a bank, building society or other loan facility.
    Use the money from the loan to pay the seller cash, they pay monthly payments bank to the bank until you have paid off the amount borrowed plus all the interest.

    The first two options are usually the only options if you are buying the car from a private seller, though you can buy from dealers this way as well.
    You could also use a bit of both, use some cash and some loan.


    Buying from car dealers usually gives you some more options as well as those above, like

    Hire Purchase (HP).
    You pay a deposit and then pay monthly payments until you have paid off the amount borrowed plus interest.
    The finance has been arranged by the dealer rather than you finding it yourself like a persoanl bank loan.

    Personal Contract Purchase (PCP).
    Similar to HP but you defer a portion of the cars value, basically whatever the car is predicted to be worth at the end of the deal is deferred (called a GFV or balloon payment) so the monthly payments are much smaller and include the interest, but you still have this balloon/GFV to deal with at the end.
    Often new car deals come with a deposit from the manufacturer but PCP on used cars tends to workout very expensive.

    You have a couple of options at the end of the PCP deal in regards to the balloon/GFV.
    Pay it and keep the car.
    Hand the car back to the finance company, if it's within it's contracted mileage and condition you pay nothing more.
    Trade it in for another car, often a good option if the car is worth more than the GFV and you want a new one.

    With HP and PCP the finance company will have some legal interest in the car until you've paid enough off it.
    With a personal loan, that's between you and the bank but they could still take it as an asset if you defaulted on the payments.


    Credit cards aren't usually accepted by dealers for the whole amount of the car, though paying a deposit on one is usually OK.
    It's also a very expensive way to borrow money if you use one for advancing cash, be aware!


    Obviously some ways are cheaper to buy than others and some types of finance suit some and not others, so you need to work out what suits and what's cheapest for you, so do your research.

    You could use cash but if the finance deal is 0% and your cash is making 5% interest in the bank, taking the 0% finance is a no brainer as using the cash means you lose the 5% and the finance isn't costing you any interest. 
    So it's worth considering what your cash is doing for you and what the finance deal is rather than jumping to the conclusion it's the cheapest.

    Also, if you have the cash and say a finance deal comes with a large manufacturers deposit, it often worth taking the finance and settling it with the cash in the first month.
    You'll only pay 56 days interest on what you have borrowed and took advantage of a large deposit contributuion.




  • Thanks for breaking down purchase options, I have better insight now. It definitely gonna guide me through 

    I appreciate everyone's support. 




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