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Heating Oil or Mains Gas?

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  • QyburnQyburn Forumite
    985 Posts
    500 Posts Second Anniversary Name Dropper
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    Just came back to me that the innards were called a "pot burner".  There was a separate opening into which you put a sort of stick with wick on the end to light it from cold. Does this look like yours?
    https://www.solidfuelappliancespares.co.uk/product/10-burner-pot/
  • ApodemusApodemus Forumite
    3.4K Posts
    Eighth Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Combo Breaker
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    Qyburn said:
    Just came back to me that the innards were called a "pot burner".  There was a separate opening into which you put a sort of stick with wick on the end to light it from cold. Does this look like yours?
    https://www.solidfuelappliancespares.co.uk/product/10-burner-pot/
    I can't remember ever seeing the whole pot, but it sounds the same.  As you say, there was a loop of wick that you lit and laid in the pot to light it.  There was also a probe that you pushed down the oil-feed from time to time to clear the soot.  Occasionally avgas was available which was known to burn very much cleaner.  Otherwise, servicing involved a hammer and chisel to remove the clinker from the base of the pot.  

    You may be right that the air-flow was set up differently for diesel than kerosene, but apart from the clinker issue, mine burned really clean and hot - easily maintained frying temperature on the stove-top, eight radiators and lots of hot-water.  Given that the alternative at the time was the Rayburn with the horribly temperamental Don burner, the Esse was streets ahead!
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