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Can I turn this electrical box into a plug?

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Hey, I'm installing a dishwasher in a kitchen where there hasn't been a dishwasher previously. I've measured up and taken out the cupboard space needed (to the right of the sink cupboard)

I've found what looks like a cooker outlet plate behind the cupboard. 

My original (and not so great) intention was to drill a hole through the worktop, run an extension lead down to the dishwasher and then to wire the extension lead plug up and plug it into the socket above the work surface - as at this point I had assumed this was my only option. 

However, is it possible to turn this outlet plate into a regular plug socket? I would ask an electrician to do it but I'd love to know if it's possible first before calling around electricians. 

Replies

  • fenwick458fenwick458 Forumite
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    probably yes. and you mean socket, not plug. assuming it's 6mm cable or less in there that is, If the cooker is wired in 10mm, you'd struggle to get 10mm into the single socket terminals
  • grumblergrumbler Forumite
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    The wire is likely to be too thick for a normal socket.
    I'd convert it to a fused spur for a socket nearby. Spurs accept up to 6mm2 cables.
    We are born naked, wet and hungry...Then things get worse. :(

    .withdrawal, NOT withdrawel ..bear with me, NOT bare with me
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  • George_MichaelGeorge_Michael Forumite
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    If the wiring there is 10mm, is there any reason why the OP's electrician couldn't fit a cooker type socket there:

    and just use the switched socket to plug the dishwasher into?
    I know that it would involve having to chop away a bit of wall for the backbox but that's not much of a job.
  • fenwick458fenwick458 Forumite
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    grumbler said:
    The wire is likely to be too thick for a normal socket.
    I'd convert it to a fused spur for a socket nearby. Spurs accept up to 6mm2 cables.
    single and double socket terminals will accept upto 6mm cable too.
    fused spur and another socket just seems un necessary to me, it's just more joints. better to do it with as few joints as possible.
    fitting the 45A cooker isolator with a 13A socket would be an option if it's wired in 10mm yes.
    so the cooker outlet in the picture above, what is in this space? is that where the dishwasher is going?
  • RisteardRisteard Forumite
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    probably yes. and you mean socket, not plug. assuming it's 6mm cable or less in there that is, If the cooker is wired in 10mm, you'd struggle to get 10mm into the single socket terminals

    It would also need to have RCD protection with a rated residual operating current not exceeding 30mA.
    RECI/Safe Electric Registered Electrical Contractor
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  • fenwick458fenwick458 Forumite
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    Risteard said:
    probably yes. and you mean socket, not plug. assuming it's 6mm cable or less in there that is, If the cooker is wired in 10mm, you'd struggle to get 10mm into the single socket terminals

    It would also need to have RCD protection with a rated residual operating current not exceeding 30mA.
    which hopefully the electrician that the OP is going to hire will know about
  • edited 30 January at 8:02PM
    RisteardRisteard Forumite
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    edited 30 January at 8:02PM
    Risteard said:
    probably yes. and you mean socket, not plug. assuming it's 6mm cable or less in there that is, If the cooker is wired in 10mm, you'd struggle to get 10mm into the single socket terminals

    It would also need to have RCD protection with a rated residual operating current not exceeding 30mA.
    which hopefully the electrician that the OP is going to hire will know about

    Indeed. I missed the part where he/she said that he was going to get an Electrician. Hopefully he/she meant this.
    RECI/Safe Electric Registered Electrical Contractor
    NICEIC Approved Contractor
    ECA Registered Member
  • williamgriffinwilliamgriffin Forumite
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    Risteard said:
    Risteard said:
    probably yes. and you mean socket, not plug. assuming it's 6mm cable or less in there that is, If the cooker is wired in 10mm, you'd struggle to get 10mm into the single socket terminals

    It would also need to have RCD protection with a rated residual operating current not exceeding 30mA.
    which hopefully the electrician that the OP is going to hire will know about

    Indeed. I missed the part where he/she said that he was going to get an Electrician. Hopefully he/she meant this.
    Maybe you should read the OP's before acting all high and mighty. 
  • BelenusBelenus Forumite
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    I hope the electrician believes in wearing a mask.  :D
    A man walked into a car showroom.
    He said to the salesman, “My wife would like to talk to you about the Volkswagen Golf in the showroom window.”
    Salesman said, “We haven't got a Volkswagen Golf in the showroom window.”
    The man replied, “You have now mate".
  • RisteardRisteard Forumite
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    Risteard said:
    Risteard said:
    probably yes. and you mean socket, not plug. assuming it's 6mm cable or less in there that is, If the cooker is wired in 10mm, you'd struggle to get 10mm into the single socket terminals

    It would also need to have RCD protection with a rated residual operating current not exceeding 30mA.
    which hopefully the electrician that the OP is going to hire will know about

    Indeed. I missed the part where he/she said that he was going to get an Electrician. Hopefully he/she meant this.
    Maybe you should read the OP's before acting all high and mighty. 
    I didn't get high and mighty you !!!!!!. I simply pointed out that RCD protection is essential. 
    RECI/Safe Electric Registered Electrical Contractor
    NICEIC Approved Contractor
    ECA Registered Member
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