Bathroom pipe cover not square

edited 30 November 2020 at 4:40PM in In My Home (includes DIY) MoneySaving
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danrvdanrv Forumite
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Hi
I’m in the process of replacing a couple of chipboard floorboards in my bathroom and have noticed that a plywood pipe cover
is out of square at the base.
It’s a box section cover that reaches up to the ceiling but only the bottom 2ft is out of line. 

There was a small cabinet there before so could hide it with another one.
I can’t really see how to reset this without replacing the whole thing. 
Any help appreciated. 


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  • Jeepers_CreepersJeepers_Creepers Forumite
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    danrv said:
    Hi
    I’m in the process of replacing a couple of chipboard floorboards in my bathroom and have noticed that a plywood pipe cover
    is out of square at the base.
    It’s a box section cover that reaches up to the ceiling but only the bottom 2ft is out of line. 

    There was a small cabinet there before so could hide it with another one.
    I can’t really see how to reset this without replacing the whole thing. 
    Any help appreciated. 


    Do you know what the boxing-in material is? It looks a bit like plywood in that photo due to the colour showing around the painted middle section? And are these screws/nails visible going down that box adjacent to the corner? 

    If yes and yes, then try undoing these screws (exposing any others above it too until you get to the 'square' bit) and see if that sheet can be pulled outwards in the corner to get it square. 

    If it can, then the next job is to make it stay there! I think an easy way would be to make up a way of keeping it square whilst expanding glue is injected in through the screw holes. Eg: drive another screw in to the panel near the bottom but a bit further away from the corner so as to miss what is almost certainly a timber batten there. Pull gently on the screw head and see if that get's the panel out to where you want it (you didn't drive the screw home, did you? Tsk...). If this works, then tie a cord to the screw head and secure the other end somewhere along that RH wall - tension the cord until the panel is straight.

    Get some Gorilla Glue (other makes are available) and inject a squirt in through each screw hole - add more holes with a drill if necessary. Allow to expand and set - jobbie jobbed.
  • edited 30 November 2020 at 6:43PM
    danrvdanrv Forumite
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    edited 30 November 2020 at 6:43PM
    Do you know what the boxing-in material is? It looks a bit like plywood in that photo due to the colour showing around the painted middle section? And are these screws/nails visible going down that box adjacent to the corner? 

    If yes and yes, then try undoing these screws (exposing any others above it too until you get to the 'square' bit) and see if that sheet can be pulled outwards in the corner to get it square. 

    If it can, then the next job is to make it stay there! I think an easy way would be to make up a way of keeping it square whilst expanding glue is injected in through the screw holes. Eg: drive another screw in to the panel near the bottom but a bit further away from the corner so as to miss what is almost certainly a timber batten there. Pull gently on the screw head and see if that get's the panel out to where you want it (you didn't drive the screw home, did you? Tsk...). If this works, then tie a cord to the screw head and secure the other end somewhere along that RH wall - tension the cord until the panel is straight.

    Get some Gorilla Glue (other makes are available) and inject a squirt in through each screw hole - add more holes with a drill if necessary. Allow to expand and set - jobbie jobbed.
    Thanks, that’s helpful.
    Yes, thin plywood, pinned to a batten. A small piece has come away, showing a copper pipe about an inch in from the side.
    Good idea about the expanding glue. The panel just needs to be prized out a bit as the rest of it is square.


  • Jeepers_CreepersJeepers_Creepers Forumite
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    Can you even squeeze your hand in that gap holding a small hammer?! If so, gently tap the ply away from the batten the required amount.

    Cut a spacer out of pretty much anything and slip it up between the ply and batten at the bottom to hold the ply out t'right amount. Drill a series of holes up that edge, and inject the polyurethane glue. Not much required - it expands quite nicely. 
  • pmartin86pmartin86 Forumite
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    I'd love to offer advice on making it "perfect" - but in my experience, just learn to live with it! I used to be obsessed with everything being 90* and a flat/square etc then i move into a 1930s house, now im happy if its "squareish" - you'd be surprised what you can get used to!
  • Jeepers_CreepersJeepers_Creepers Forumite
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    No need for it to be perfect - if it's taken down to just a few mm discrepancy front to back, skirting can then be added 'square' and any slightly increasing gap showing on top filled with caulk as would be required in any case.

    For how straight-forward it should be to sort out this quite-visible 'out-of-true', it's surely worth it. 

    Anyhoo, Dan - 'after' photos needed :-)
  • danrvdanrv Forumite
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    Thanks for the ideas. Got a little side tracked from the ‘out of square’ pipe cover as I’m taking up the subfloor.
    I think I will try and even it out with a spacer as suggested by Jeepers. 
    Needs to be prized out about 8mm at the bottom edge
  • edited 20 December 2020 at 1:48PM
    Jeepers_CreepersJeepers_Creepers Forumite
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    edited 20 December 2020 at 1:48PM
    Prizing it out by 8mm should be peasy.

    And the prise for the best solution goes to...  :-)
  • edited 24 March at 1:48PM
    danrvdanrv Forumite
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    edited 24 March at 1:48PM
    No need for it to be perfect - if it's taken down to just a few mm discrepancy front to back, skirting can then be added 'square' and any slightly increasing gap showing on top filled with caulk as would be required in any case.

    For how straight-forward it should be to sort out this quite-visible 'out-of-true', it's surely worth it. 

    Anyhoo, Dan - 'after' photos needed :-)
    Yes, worth it.
    After a fair bit of leverage, I’ve worked the panel loose. 
    It’s not secure yet and I’ll probably make up a wedge shaped bit of wood to fit.
    I can reuse the nail hole there at the bottom and also the two tiny panel pins above.
    Thanks.


  • FreeBearFreeBear Forumite
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    For tight spaces, a right angle drill head is useful. I've also used a flexible extension for those really tight spots..
    Her courage will change the world.

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  • danrvdanrv Forumite
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    FreeBear said:
    For tight spaces, a right angle drill head is useful. I've also used a flexible extension for those really tight spots..
    Good ideas, thanks.
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