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New State Pension qualifying years and contributions paid in other EU countries - Page 2

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New State Pension qualifying years and contributions paid in other EU countries

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  • edited 26 August 2019 at 6:44PM
    woolly_wombatwoolly_wombat Forumite
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    edited 26 August 2019 at 6:44PM
    I've never got a straight answer on this , either on here, in person at a social welfare office in Ireland, or on the phone to the relevant dept here in the UK.
    I'll have enough for full state pension in the UK. I also have 17 years of full class one PRSI contributions in Ireland.

    So I can see what I'll get from here, but no idea if I'll get anything for the 17 full years in Ireland.
    You have more than the minimum 10 years contributions for your pension in Ireland, and you also have enough for a full UK state pension.

    You look to be in a sweet spot despite Brexit.

    It appears from xylophone's link to the Irish Times article that it is only possible to pay additional voluntary contributions to the Irish scheme if you already have the minimum 10 years.

    However the other link is interesting:
    https://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/social_welfare/social_welfare_payments/older_and_retired_people/state_pension_contributory.html
    Brexit and the State Pension (Contributory)

    After Brexit, you will continue to get your Irish State Pension (Contributory) or UK State Pension, as before. Irish and UK citizens living in Ireland can still benefit from social insurance contributions made when working in the UK.
  • eastcorkrameastcorkram Forumite
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    That first link from xylophone implies that you can get the Irish OR the UK one. I've never seen it mentioned that anyone can get both. There's a possibility I could end up living there after retirement, so I guess I could use some of my UK years to make the Irish one a full pension .

    I'm certainly not counting on getting something from the time there, but if I could know in advance , for definite, that I was going to, I'd probably change my plans and dates a little.
  • edited 23 August 2019 at 6:00AM
    nigelbbnigelbb Forumite
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    edited 23 August 2019 at 6:00AM
    That first link from xylophone implies that you can get the Irish OR the UK one. I've never seen it mentioned that anyone can get both. There's a possibility I could end up living there after retirement, so I guess I could use some of my UK years to make the Irish one a full pension .

    I'm certainly not counting on getting something from the time there, but if I could know in advance , for definite, that I was going to, I'd probably change my plans and dates a little.
    You should get both state pensions. They are both contributory & independent of one another. I have state pensions from both France & the UK. The EU websites that describe what happens if you work & earn a pension in more than one EU state are confusing as thy imply that you get just one pension made up of sums from each country pro rata. This is not true. What happens is that you apply through one pension service who then pass on your details to the other service who contact you & then deal with you directly. The years in each scheme count as qualifying years e.g towards the UK's minimum of 10 years but for nothing else. Each pension was earned independently with contributions & each is paid independently.

    If you have worked in two EU countries it's double bubble pension-wise as once you have been enrolled in a scheme you can generally pay voluntary contributions for years when you were working in the other country. The Irish system looks very complicated but if you take the UK n theory you could work 5 years here the move to Ireland for the rest of your working life but continue to make Class 2 NI contributions in the UK at £150/year. For total voluntary contributions of just £4500 you would buy an index-linked pension of £8767/year which you could take alongside the pension you earned working in Ireland.
  • edited 23 August 2019 at 4:19PM
    Rich2808Rich2808 Forumite
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    edited 23 August 2019 at 4:19PM
    Well worth investigating buying added years in the Irish scheme.

    In the light of current uncertainty I would be inclined to make that a priority right now.

    You still have plenty of time to plug the gap in your UK state pension.

    Irish state pension is also far more generous than the UK one – even now. So worth keeping some entitlement – and as has been said buying added years.

    My father only worked for 10 years in Ireland in a low wage job in the late 1950s/early 60s – but 30 years here.

    He received 240 euro a week from the Irish authorities in state pension – including a 100 euro top up as my mother ‘s UK state pension was below £100 a week - £60 more than his UK state pension (including SERPS). In effect the Irish government topped up my mum's UK state pension based on my father's Irish PRSI contributions alone (all before they married) despite her never having worked there (she worked for the NHS as a nurse for a decade!). Shows how shockingly poor our state pension is!

    There is an Irish specific forum covering those issues – which is a useful source of Irish advice.

    https://www.askaboutmoney.com/
  • lisboa84lisboa84 Forumite
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    jgmve wrote: »
    The DWP said I needed to continue to contribute until 2022 when I retire. My NI record shows six years missing contributions - the years I contributed in the Republic of Ireland.

    As others have said, I also believe that you will be entitled to something from the Ireland state pension.
    But it's difficult to ascertain what exactly you will be able to claim when the time comes as Ireland is currently transitioning from one state pension method to another. I think at the moment they're actually overlapping, but a new total contribution approach has been introduced and is supposed to be fully rolled out in 2020 but may have been delayed because of Brexit taking priority.

    So it's going to mirror the UK method eventually, the rumours are that 40 years will get you the maximum pension amount of 248.30 Euros a week.

    So at the moment I would expect you get a pro rata 6/40 of that.

    Did you work 6 full calendar years?
    Ireland has a pre-entry credit rule, whereas no matter which date of the year you started work in Ireland, they will give you credits backdated to January 1st of that year. So depending on your dates, you could end up with 7 years on your record.

    I don't think you said how old you are but note that in 2021 the Ireland state pension age will rise to 67 years.
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