Gallant soldier weed control

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
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slingaslinga Forumite
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edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
I've got
Galinsoga ciliata/Gallant soldier weeds in my vegetable plot.
They arrived I think through store bought compost maybe 8 years ago.
I spread the compost and then had to go overseas for 3 months and when I returned these weeds were 3 feet or so high and the seeds pods were dry and when I tried to pull them up the seeds, thousands of them fell to the earth.
I didn't know what I was in for.

I tried hoeing regularly I tried pulling the weeds up and taking the plants to the tip, I did that daily and thoroughly but the blighters still remain and come back each year.

Although I thoroughly remove all traces of the plant I go overseas every October for 6 months until April so can't be sure the weeds don't return in that period before the frost and set seed.

Any ideas what might get rid of them for good.

Eating them won't work.
It's your money. Except if it's the governments.

Replies

  • Linda32Linda32 Forumite
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    I do not know what they are without searching, but I can tell you I have had an allotment since 2006 and weed week after week year after year, they never go away. It is just a cycle, the weeds grow the crops grow. ;)
  • DavesnaveDavesnave Forumite
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    It's an annual with a seed viability of 10 years, so germination of existing seed will continue for some time. There are no germination inhibitors, so it'll come up any time when conditions allow and won't stay dormant. If the plot is regularly disturbed by digging, most seed will have done its stuff long before 10 years is up.

    But that's if no new seed is distributed.....

    This is much the same as the problem I have/had with green manure mustard. Before my time, someone let it seed, and with a life cycle that completes in 4 - 6 weeks, that really wasn't wise! Helped greatly by the bright yellow flower, I don't let it get as far as seeding. Any newly cultivated ground produces a bumper crop, but after a few years, ground regularly disturbed shows little or no mustard.

    It's not the same for docks, but then they have a viability of 70 years and possibly have some inhibitors against mass germination.

    So, it will get better, but only if you or someone else knocks it back, as I do with the mustard.
    People who don't stand for something will fall for anything.
  • slingaslinga Forumite
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    Davesnave wrote: »
    It's an annual with a seed viability of 10 years, so germination of existing seed will continue for some time. There are no germination inhibitors, so it'll come up any time when conditions allow and won't stay dormant. If the plot is regularly disturbed by digging, most seed will have done its stuff long before 10 years is up.

    But that's if no new seed is distributed.....

    This is much the same as the problem I have/had with green manure mustard. Before my time, someone let it seed, and with a life cycle that completes in 4 - 6 weeks, that really wasn't wise! Helped greatly by the bright yellow flower, I don't let it get as far as seeding. Any newly cultivated ground produces a bumper crop, but after a few years, ground regularly disturbed shows little or no mustard.

    It's not the same for docks, but then they have a viability of 70 years and possibly have some inhibitors against mass germination.

    So, it will get better, but only if you or someone else knocks it back, as I do with the mustard.
    Thanks.
    I dig over at least annually and many areas more often.
    I'm fastidious about digging them up by the roots before they even flower let alone seed. But I don't know what happens in the time I'm away, Oct to April every year, but I don't see any dead or dried out plants which could have been Gallant soldiers when I return in April.
    Of course importing weeds with store bought compost is a risk and happens whenever I buy the stuff, different weeds each time, so I don't buy it any longer.
    I'll just have to keep up with the weeding.
    But it's hard on my back.:)
    It's your money. Except if it's the governments.
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