Your homegrown yearly calendar

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
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TeddiTeddi Forumite
76 Posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
Hello


I am just starting out on proper home growing, I had a few window boxes with herbs and salads before but now I have a huge garden, a pre marked out veg patch, a composter and a load of tools.


I want to make sure I am planning my year correctly so I was wondering what your home growing calendar looks like, what do you plant and what jobs do you get done in each month?


Especially September! Anything I can get in before winter hits?


Thank you for your help

Replies

  • Linda32Linda32 Forumite
    4.4K Posts
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    You can prepare your beds and add manure if you want too. Which is not a 5 minute job :D

    Fruit bushes can be planted now.
  • wellusedwellused Forumite
    1.7K Posts
    You shouldn't grow the same veg in the same bed every year so work out the best way that you can divide the garden into three or four sections. I have potatoes in one section which follow cabbages from the previous year, the cabbages follow the beans and peas, and the peas and beans follow the potatoes, if that makes any sense. You shouldn't put tomatoes near to the potatoes because of the risk of blight spreading but I grow mine in the greenhouse so that's not so much of a problem for me. Now carrots suffer from carrot fly so as well as covering them with a barrier I grow my onions nearby to disguise the smell of the carrots to confuse the fly. Leeks suffer from leek moth so I have to cover them as the moth attack in June and again in august but I don't plant leeks out until the early potatoes are dug as I start them off at home. Peas get clobbered by pea moth so it's best to plant some as early as you can so the flowers have set before the moth attack in June July, you can still grow maincrop peas which flower in June but you must either cover them over or spray them once the flowers have set, you can also grow a later crop of peas sown in June which will miss the moth. If you like broad beans you can grow overwintering varieties which will miss the blackfly attack as they crop earlier they get sown in November, also garlic can be sown in December. At this time of year I would be looking to dig any empty ground over when the ground is not too wet to dig. Hope this helps.
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