Panic buttons

Could anyone provide me with experience or information about "panic buttons" for the elderly, please ? I would like my mother to have something that she could wear as well as something in her house that might be of use if she has a accident that requires assistance ? Many thanks.
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Replies

  • If you contact your local Social Services they should be able to help.
    My friends gran had something similar so that if she had a fall or anything she could press a button and someone would go to the house to make sure she was all right.
  • martindowmartindow Forumite
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    My father has a button and machine next to the phone which was organised through Age Concern (I think or possibly Help the Aged). The main problem is that he will not wear it. He keeps in by his bed and says that he will wear it when he needs to but that's not yet- so not very successful. It also went through a phase of going off as a false alarms, but that has not happened recently.
  • wolfehousewolfehouse Forumite
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    they are very useful and reassuring. I sure wouldn't want to fall and wait for hours for help.

    things you should look out for are:
    installation fees vary widely
    maintaince fees do too
    you must provide a relative/friend who is willing to respond (they will answer the call in the first instance).

    social services are tied in with some companies. they vary according to locality. in my area it is housing associations often running them like this one-
    bield alarms http://www.bield.co.uk/community_alarm/index.html

    here is a good review of what you should consider (ricability is a charity which reviews products for the disabled)
    http://www.ricability.org.uk/reports/report-telecoms/Community%20alarms/Whatisanalarm.htm
  • seven-day-weekendseven-day-weekend Forumite
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    My late MIL had one through Social Services.
    (AKA HRH_MUngo)
    Member #10 of £2 savers club
    Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology: Terry Eagleton
  • wolfehousewolfehouse Forumite
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    forgot to mention there are issues if the person has dementia so depends on the person if they have no trouble remembering to use it.
  • FranFran Forumite
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    I know someone who had one fitted, they had a grant of some sort to cover the cost of installation so that's worth asking social services if they don't mention it.
    Torgwen.......... :) ...........
  • tubmogtubmog Forumite
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    Hi

    Just bought a 'phoneguardian 100' for my Gran , they are down to £70 from £100 at Boots.com , type in 'phoneguardian 100' in search box to get to product. It's a new product recently featured on ITV and it rings three numbers of your choice in a set order should a panic dongle be pressed and won't give up until the hash key is pressed.Best of all no subscription and back in stock as went like hot cakes on Tuesday but it seems some are back in stock. Even better now triple points and use promo code KGAC34 when you checkout and get another 500 points on top.

    Good deal plus peace of mind
  • Hi

    My Mother has an 'Aid Call' pendant which was fairly expensive to start with (for lifetime membership) but well worth it for our peace of mind. Comes via Age Concern if I remember rightly.
  • Hi
    One of my roles in society is to install these units. We call them Lifelines and are a great form of independance to the user and a GREAT peace of mind to the relations of the user. My only comment is the costs involved. In my experience the two most expensive ways to obtain the unit is:-

    1. Via age Concern (This is not a slight against the organisation) just the charges they put on the unit considering their role in life is to support our most vulnerable society members not bankrupt them.

    2. Don't buy the unit. If you need to replace the pendant it's very expensive and the unit is useless once the user has moved into a residential/nursing home where 24hr care is provided within the package.


    The unit has other benefits to the user includung answering incoming phone calls without picking up a phone. A great facility for those that are less mobile around the house ;)
    "Did you hear about the frog that broke down on the motorway???? They toad him away!"
  • martindow wrote: »
    My father has a button and machine next to the phone which was organised through Age Concern (I think or possibly Help the Aged). The main problem is that he will not wear it. He keeps in by his bed and says that he will wear it when he needs to but that's not yet- so not very successful. It also went through a phase of going off as a false alarms, but that has not happened recently.

    Hi Can I make a suggestion. These buttons are normally offered with a cord (we call them pendants) My experience is that they are the better option but it rarely gets explained to the user that once around the neck (or over a collar if it causes irritation) it can be tucked down a shirt/blouse or placed in a breast pocket if one is available on a shirt/blouse. Easy solution once properly explained believe me. But when we know that there are problems with wearing the button it can be supplied with an elasticated wrist strap (or even a clip but I find this idea the least safe because the spring on the clip is not very strong, one fall and it could go anywhere once the user has a fall. This in turn would give them another reason not to wear it).

    When I visit people to introduce this system I readily make light of false alarms (we call them accidentals) because we don't want people to feel threatened by them or afraid that accidentals are "forbidden" Many people press accidentals, some are genuine, and some people use it as an excuse to talk with our operators again we know this and accept it as past of the caring process. One lady called in recently and said she had pressed it accidentally, I duly replied that it was ok and just as I was about to close the call she asked me what time it was, was it raining where I was, and had I got long left to do on my shift. People just sometimes need reassurance from both families and control centre staff and the experience of this system becomes more enjoyable for all concerned.

    I hope this helps in some way ;)
    "Did you hear about the frog that broke down on the motorway???? They toad him away!"
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