We've changed the name of this board from 'Greenfingered MoneySaving' to simply 'Gardening'. This is to help make it easier to find for the horticulturally inclined. The URL remains unchanged for the time being, so all links to the board are unaffected.

Old Fashioned Country Garden

Options
mardatha
mardatha Posts: 15,612 Forumite
I want to try an old fashioned cottage garden in the front. My soil is very poor as we live on a hill and all the goodness runs away, but over the years I've flattened a bit and chucked in loads of compost and gunge from the chicken run.
Can I have ideas and suggestions on what to plant? I live at around 300m/1000ft
and its cold & windy - but this bed is pretty sheltered next to the house and facing due south..
«1

Comments

  • mardatha
    mardatha Posts: 15,612 Forumite
    Options
    Bump this :d
  • lostinrates
    lostinrates Posts: 55,283 Forumite
    I've been Money Tipped!
    Options
    Marthada, i am bumping becuase while i feel comfortable with cootage gardens in thje south of england, i have no idea what would work for you up there.

    How big is the garden? S e old fashioned roses, or modern old fashioned style roses are tough. Other things i have in my sort of cottage garden style borders include: lupins, foxgloves, hollyhocks, poppies, hardy geraniums, snapdraggons, daisy type plants of various types...asters, crysanthemums.. Things that are easy and self seed and clump.
  • mardatha
    mardatha Posts: 15,612 Forumite
    Options
    What's hardy geraniums? I will google that ty. I have grown poppies and for a while we had tons of lupins, so they will do - ta. Can you still get Night Scented Stock? Had that in our garden when I grew up and loved it. Will carnations do here? And yes asters are lovely. Foxgloves and hollyhocks I tried and wind ruined them, likewise sweet peas. Garden is biggish front garden and south facing. A neighbour down the road has some really fancy roses, very old fashioned ones that smell heavenly - but they have a 6ft high stone wall right round the garden. They only do roses :)
  • madjackslam
    madjackslam Posts: 280 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Combo Breaker
    Options
    Lostinrates makes a really good point. When you say "old fashioned country garden" do you mean "old fashioned English country garden"? This was originally a mix of herbs and flowers that looked good and were productive. But what's the Scottish equivalent, if there ever was one?
    I would also look around for local sources of inspiration for what might work - other gardens in nearby streets, for example, and then "professional" gardens in the vicinity.
    To lostinrates list of plants to consider, I'd include herby type things - lavender, santolina, rosemary, thyme, sage. And to add to the list of cottage garden plants - aquilegias.
  • officeguru
    officeguru Posts: 725 Forumite
    First Anniversary Combo Breaker
    Options
    Hi Mardatha, you can grow sweetpeas along the ground, they don't have to be grown up stakes... You could always grow dianthus as they are low growing (minature type carnation) and won't be affected by the wind.. I always sprinkle some night-scented stock seeds among my pot plants and they seem to grow well... A favourite of mine is the poached egg plant that's an easy to seed annual that self seeds... I know it is not strictly cottage garden, but what about a bamboo? I have grown mine in a large (half sunken) pot to keep it under control and it manages fine in the wind as it blows through it... You could maybe try a couple of hardy fuschias... They are not expensive and they should be alright.. and some hebes...

    Hopes this helps..

    Cheers
  • madjackslam
    madjackslam Posts: 280 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Combo Breaker
    Options
    Hardy geraniums (all members of the Geranium genus) to distinguish from pelargoniums (tender "geraniums" in the Pelargonium genus). They're completely different plants that got muddled up at some stage. Many different kinds of hardy geranium for all kinds of situation. They're often as tough as old boots and flower their socks off. Usually in pinks and purples.
  • mardatha
    mardatha Posts: 15,612 Forumite
    Options
    You're all brilliant - many thanks! I have writ doon yer every word :D Nobody here in this tiny village has flower gardens, apart from one who grows only roses. The rest are farmworkers who grow only veg, or yuppies who grow weeds and decking. Mind there's only about 2 doz houses here lol.
    I forgot aquilegias and I love them, they went mad one year and popped up everywhere so I could help them along with some seeds, ta for that.
    I tried bamboo out the back round the hens but it seems to have vanished :(
    But I got plenty to be going on with, and thanks very much for help. ;)
  • RAS
    RAS Posts: 32,829 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Anniversary First Post
    Options
    mardatha

    The secret is shelter really - try elder, hazel, laburnum, rowan and birch and even willow as a mixed "hedge" on the windward side. read Hovel in the Hills or Garden in the Hills by Elizabeth West for ideas on what grows at 1000 foot.

    Larkspur seems to feature in a lot of northern gardens I see.

    I would suggest some of the shorter shrub roses or rugosas roses or Canary Bird Yellow kept short to provide some robust "height." Look up David Austen roses if you can cope with yearning - a lot of his are well scented.

    Hellebores, welsh poppies, borage? primroses, snapdragon or toadflax? Perennial cornflowers, thymes, chives (for the flowers as much as the herb).

    Even a clump of rhubarb (which grows well in northern Norway and Siberia) would provide useful height and structure.
    The person who has not made a mistake, has made nothing
  • RAS
    RAS Posts: 32,829 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Anniversary First Post
    Options
    Oh and send someone into Lidl for their 4 for £1 packs - cottage marigolds, snapdragons and snoopea (a type of low tumbling sweetpea) and maybe cosmos?
    The person who has not made a mistake, has made nothing
  • nightingalesgarden
    Options
    I know the feeling - My darling girls play riot in my garden but there are a few that survive through...

    Ornamental poppies - buy at the end of March/april when they are in the bargain bin (as no longer flowering) and split into lots of little plants in pots for the following year - hens eat them to the ground over winter but they always survive

    Cosmos - an annual - plant direct into the ground - never fail to make me smile (the one thing my mum and I agree on - our favourite flower) and seem to deal with the wind/hens fine. If you deadhead then lasts for ever

    Achillea (Yarrow) - either seeds or buy plants and break up into smaller - hardy, hens ignore, can leave the heads for insects in the winter, doesn't grow too fast - great selection of colours - cannot recommend highly enough

    Fox Gloves - I know not good for hens, however they are intelligent enough not to eat them

    Love-in-a-mist- annual but self seeds - wouldn't be a country garden without them - again, will grow where you throw the seeds. Save the seeds for next year or for your salads

    Marigolds (English/French) great for collecting seeds year on year, cheap as chips from seed - just weed out the ones that you don't want..
This discussion has been closed.
Meet your Ambassadors

Categories

  • All Categories
  • 343.8K Banking & Borrowing
  • 250.3K Reduce Debt & Boost Income
  • 450K Spending & Discounts
  • 235.9K Work, Benefits & Business
  • 609.1K Mortgages, Homes & Bills
  • 173.4K Life & Family
  • 248.5K Travel & Transport
  • 1.5M Hobbies & Leisure
  • 15.9K Discuss & Feedback
  • 15.1K Coronavirus Support Boards