Do I have to have mercury fillings on NHS?

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Health & Beauty MoneySaving
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tinalivestinalives Forumite
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edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Health & Beauty MoneySaving
Hi,

Does anyone know whether there is the option to have non-mercury fillings in my back teeth on the NHS? (I don't want mercury in my body) If so, what should it cost?

If the only option is to have it done privately, roughly how much does it cost?

Thanks.

Replies

  • welshdentwelshdent Forumite
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    The NHS only provides that which is clinically necessary and appropriate. Therefore you probably would not get a white filling on a biting surface of a molar tooth. Therefore no amount of NHS payments would alter that. also you can not "top up" NHS charges to private.

    ANY general dentist can place white fillings and how much they charge would be their or pratice policy. A conservative estimate would be £40 but they can and do go up. Its all dependent on the practice. Ideally your dentist should tell you what treatment you need and what is available for you. You can then chose to pay privately for white fillings or have the amalgam ones as part of an NHS course of treatment.

    An alternative may be a composite or metal inlays. These are lab made fillings and good in cases where there is a large amount of the tooth to be restored. I am a BIG fan of these especially the composite ones as they have allowed me to massively reduce the amount of crowns I provide which means less damage to already weakened teeth. BUT they are significantly more expensive as they are band 3 items of treatment and not always appropriate.
  • ToothsmithToothsmith Forumite
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    There are many ways that mercury can get into your body. Fillings are quite a minor one.
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
  • brook2jackbrook2jack Forumite
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    EatiNg fish is the biggest source of mercury in most peoples bodies.

    As Welshdent said it will be dental amalgam on the nhs. The simple way to avoid this is to adjust your diet so you don't need fillings.

    Privately depending on how large you will be looking at £40 to £150 per White (composite) filling. However these also have their health concerns not the least of which is bis gma which has been banned in babies bottles etc.

    There is no ideal filling material they are all made from materials that are potentially hazardous, and have drawbacks. The only treatment with no risks is to have the teeth out! The who, FDA, eu acknowledges that until dental materials improve amalgam still has a place in dentistry .

    You can choose not to have amalgams but you should be aware of any compromises this has (short life of composites if you have alot of decay going on, composites not good on very large fillings on back teeth, etc) and you will have to pay privately.
  • ToothsmithToothsmith Forumite
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    If a new cavity in a tooth is very small, then technically, white filling should be the material of choice - even on the NHS - as it has been demonstrated to be the best way to fill a tiny cavity, so the dentist would have to justify using a 'lesser' material.

    For anything bigger, amalgam is the NHS option unless you can demonstrate that you are adversely affected by it (which is actually very rare) and will require consultants reports.
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
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