Medicine shortage

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Health & Beauty MoneySaving
30 replies 2.8K views
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  • Nicki wrote: »
    I thought I was doing well to get 3 bottles at once. To begin with, they would only give me 1 at a time and I was having to visit the GP every 10 days for a refill! I was under the impression that current guidelines only allow them to prescribe a month at a time, but that might just be my PCT (or whatever the local body is now called!)

    I

    Do none of your pharmacies offer a repeat prescription service? My DD is on constant medication and i pick up a 3 week supply from my local boots and they do the whole repeat prescription thing, i dont need to go back to the GP.
    The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt.
    Bertrand Russell
  • NickiNicki Forumite
    8.2K Posts
    Do none of your pharmacies offer a repeat prescription service? My DD is on constant medication and i pick up a 3 week supply from my local boots and they do the whole repeat prescription thing, i dont need to go back to the GP.

    Yes my local one now does and I now use it. Would still have been visiting the pharmacy every 10 days at the time though for the refills until they upped the quantities.
  • so glad to hear you have a solution to the immediate problem, although it still must be worrying that the supply isn't reliable. but i am relieved to see that there was progress today.
    :happyhear
  • VfM4meplseVfM4meplse
    34.3K Posts
    I've been Money Tipped!
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    Glad things have been resolved temporarily.
    gwen80 wrote: »
    In response to the post above, please be very careful buying any medication on the internet. Medication bought on the internet is significantly more likely to be counterfeit.
    Good point, it's not always possible to tell which have a genuine NHS distance-selling contract. I would always recommend using a conventional pharmacy though, as you will find that they will go out of their way to help you in all sorts of unlikely ways. You cannot put a value on the relationship you have with your pharmacist!
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy :D...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...I love chaz-ing!
  • NickiNicki Forumite
    8.2K Posts
    VfM4meplse wrote: »
    Glad things have been resolved temporarily.

    Good point, it's not always possible to tell which have a genuine NHS distance-selling contract. I would always recommend using a conventional pharmacy though, as you will find that they will go out of their way to help you in all sorts of unlikely ways. You cannot put a value on the relationship you have with your pharmacist!

    Though I appear to have been getting some very good advice from an online pharmacist on here. :beer: Or have I completely misjudged what you do for a living :D?
  • gwen80 wrote: »
    In response to the post above, please be very careful buying any medication on the internet. Medication bought on the internet is significantly more likely to be counterfeit.
    missed this yesterday - just wanted to say i would never ever encourage people to buy online from dodgy websites. but in this specific situation, it might have been an option to go through a legitimate, reliable service (like boots!) as they may have a large store of available product versus any single pharmacy. i don't want to be misinterpreted in any way of suggesting using dodgy websites and buying drugs direct when you have no guarantee of what you might be getting. i only suggested places that require an NHS prescription and as a last resort.
    :happyhear
  • rev_henryrev_henry Forumite
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    missed this yesterday - just wanted to say i would never ever encourage people to buy online from dodgy websites. but in this specific situation, it might have been an option to go through a legitimate, reliable service (like boots!) as they may have a large store of available product versus any single pharmacy. i don't want to be misinterpreted in any way of suggesting using dodgy websites and buying drugs direct when you have no guarantee of what you might be getting. i only suggested places that require an NHS prescription and as a last resort.
    That was what I was meaning - as a last resort just to get hold of the damn stuff. I'm not entirely comfortable with the concept of an online Pharmacy, even if it is properly registered and legit. As the Pharmacist (me in 3 years time :eek: ) can't have a quick chat with a patient, pick up on things by seeing the patient face to face etc etc...
  • rev_henry wrote: »
    That was what I was meaning - as a last resort just to get hold of the damn stuff. I'm not entirely comfortable with the concept of an online Pharmacy, even if it is properly registered and legit. As the Pharmacist (me in 3 years time :eek: ) can't have a quick chat with a patient, pick up on things by seeing the patient face to face etc etc...
    i do see your point to a degree, but for many people who are immobile/invalids (or indeed just working!), it's someone else who is picking up the prescription anyway. not once has a pharmacist come round to see me and speak to me when i've picked up a prescription.... an assistant passes them the form and then shouts your name when it's ready. in principle, a pharmacist is a net to catch things, but the reality is that in practice, that almost never happens.

    now my pharmacist has been very helpful when i've had minor ailments - suggesting what might work, checking it suits me etc etc. i don't mean to devalue the service they can offer or the skills that they have at all. i just don't think it's a fair reflection of many pharmacies to suggest that most pharmacists spend much time speaking face to face with patients every time a prescription comes in since the patient often isn't present....... an online pharmacy isn't much different..... (although i'd think in general it's probably a much slower process and less convenient and it wouldn't be how i'd choose to go about things)
    :happyhear
  • NickiNicki Forumite
    8.2K Posts
    To be fair, I've had more than once had a pharmacist come and talk to me when dispensing a script. Usually to check I've had it before and know how to take it, and what might interfere with it. I also though had a Boots pharmacist virtually refuse to dispense a prescription for me when I was heavily pregnant, even though it had been prescribed by a consultant in the full knowledge I was pregnant, and to deal with a pregnancy related condition (albeit not a common one). I also when suffering from PND had a pharmacist discuss with me the addictive nature of some sedative drugs which had been prescribed and give me advice in relation to this. My OH was also asked whether I was breastfeeding when he picked up some antibiotics for a post natal infection for me. So I think when the circumstances demand it, most pharmacists will speak to the patient, or the person collecting the medicine to ensure it is appropriate, but I guess the vast majority of prescriptions don't require this.
  • rev_henryrev_henry Forumite
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    i do see your point to a degree, but for many people who are immobile/invalids (or indeed just working!), it's someone else who is picking up the prescription anyway. not once has a pharmacist come round to see me and speak to me when i've picked up a prescription.... an assistant passes them the form and then shouts your name when it's ready. in principle, a pharmacist is a net to catch things, but the reality is that in practice, that almost never happens.

    now my pharmacist has been very helpful when i've had minor ailments - suggesting what might work, checking it suits me etc etc. i don't mean to devalue the service they can offer or the skills that they have at all. i just don't think it's a fair reflection of many pharmacies to suggest that most pharmacists spend much time speaking face to face with patients every time a prescription comes in since the patient often isn't present....... an online pharmacy isn't much different..... (although i'd think in general it's probably a much slower process and less convenient and it wouldn't be how i'd choose to go about things)

    Yes you do have a point, for many people (possibly the majority of patients) who are on regular repeats that they know how to take blindfolded there is no need for the Pharmacist to come and speak to them, but there are other things the pharmacist does behind the scenes - making sure the Doctor hasn't made a mistake with the script for one...
    The rest of what I was going to say Nicki has already said below!
    Nicki wrote: »
    To be fair, I've had more than once had a pharmacist come and talk to me when dispensing a script. Usually to check I've had it before and know how to take it, and what might interfere with it. I also though had a Boots pharmacist virtually refuse to dispense a prescription for me when I was heavily pregnant, even though it had been prescribed by a consultant in the full knowledge I was pregnant, and to deal with a pregnancy related condition (albeit not a common one). I also when suffering from PND had a pharmacist discuss with me the addictive nature of some sedative drugs which had been prescribed and give me advice in relation to this. My OH was also asked whether I was breastfeeding when he picked up some antibiotics for a post natal infection for me. So I think when the circumstances demand it, most pharmacists will speak to the patient, or the person collecting the medicine to ensure it is appropriate, but I guess the vast majority of prescriptions don't require this.
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