Central Ticketing

I have a ticket from Central Ticketing for parking in the private park of DD's flat when she was moving out. We were only there for the duration of loading the vehicle and had been let in by security - the park is barriered. I have appealed (by email) but the response was that we did not display a permit. DD doesn't own a car so there is no permit and none was given when security let us in - in fact we had no idea there were any as there is a barrier.

My question is this - as the van we used was hired from a local company I'm sure if I ignore the ticket from now on they will be contacted - are they obliged to give our address to Central?

Thank you.

Replies

  • Kite2010Kite2010 Forumite
    4.3K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Home Insurance Hacker! Car Insurance Carver!
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    Check the hire agreement as some rental firms have a habit of paying anything which lands on their desk and either charging it to your card (with a nice admin fee) or trying to get the money back from you.
  • notrichnotrich Forumite
    45 Posts
    Thanks, I've emailed them to ring me, so hopefully will stop that. But I want to know if they HAVE to divulge our details anyway, so I know what to say when I speak to them. At the moment Central only have my email address.
  • They don't HAVE to. Nobody HAS to when it is a private company. With council, it is the keeper's (not the driver's) problem.

    In cases of panic, it is better that they do, rather that than pay them before extracting the money from you. After all, you have the right of appeal - further appeal that is. You have the right to deny the debt and request it go to adjudication. With this, you may be facing a separate battle should the rental firm take money from you and pay it to the PPC. If so, the battle with the PPC is lost BUT you can start a new campaign to reclaim your money from the rental company.

    A friend of mine is worried about coming with the rest of us in the night for a late coffee at the nearby motorway services. He once overstayed, but the car belonged to his company who in turn docked his wages to pay it. That was wholly inappropriate as it denied him everything he could have done. His firm's offence though was taking money from him for this venture - I told him he should write to them and if they refuse to repay it, have them at the Employment Tribunal for Unlawful Deduction of Wages. He'd have won hands down - but he doesn't want to make "ripples" in case they lay him off next time brown envelopes are being issued (can't have them for Unfair Dismissal here).

    Your situation is different, I would at this point contact the rental company, explain the circumstance - tell them to name you so you don't lose out whilst enfeebled; then IF the letter chain starts, just ignore. Don't use the word "appeal" because it sends signals that you acede to their authority, which you don't! Let them do the chasing, they'll back down before it goes to court.
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