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Strange - "We participate in a civil debt recovery scheme" sign in supermarket

edited 11 January 2011 at 6:40PM in Discussion Time
31 replies 517 views
24

Replies

  • Just extortion then, using scare tactics.
    When I worked in retail the extortion, scare tactics, and outright violence came from the thieves who knew how soft the system was.

    The public image of absent minded little old ladies being brutalised by nasty store detectives is a complete myth. We are talking about scum; including one couple who used to hide stolen items in their child's pushchair.

    The police and CPS used to routinely not bother prosecuting. So if you own a shop and your profits are being stolen by scumbags every day, what do you do? You take civil proceedings to recover your property.

    Or would you be OK with people coming in your home and helping themselves to your possessions? Oh, that's different.
    I was present at wreath-laying but don't think I was involved.
  • Li0nheadLi0nhead Forumite
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    I guess looking at it like that, bottles of alcohol are the most expensive items in the shop although this was in the own brand soft drink section(this is MSE after all ;) )

    At my employer last year we started putting chewing gum (this is 100% true, not sure if we still do though) multipacks in security cases after the management realised we were loosing a lot of stock (was told a figure in the low 1000s).

    The industry knows that the most shoplifted item was razor blades as they are easy to conceal but costly.
    Hi there! We’ve had to remove your signature. It was so good we removed it because we cannot think of one so good as you had and need to protect others from seeing such a great signature.
  • Li0nheadLi0nhead Forumite
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    When I worked in retail the extortion, scare tactics, and outright violence came from the thieves who knew how soft the system was.

    The public image of absent minded little old ladies being brutalised by nasty store detectives is a complete myth. We are talking about scum; including one couple who used to hide stolen items in their child's pushchair.

    The police and CPS used to routinely not bother prosecuting. So if you own a shop and your profits are being stolen by scumbags every day, what do you do? You take civil proceedings to recover your property.

    Or would you be OK with people coming in your home and helping themselves to your possessions? Oh, that's different.

    Agreed, we hear tales from our day staff from time to time which are the same as you say above, one tale of a man who pulled a needle out when challanged!
    Hi there! We’ve had to remove your signature. It was so good we removed it because we cannot think of one so good as you had and need to protect others from seeing such a great signature.
  • MadoMado Forumite
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    scotsbob wrote: »
    £40 buys a lot of lentils, breakfast cereals, chick peas and dried pasta.
    She must have had a very big coat.:rotfl::rotfl::rotfl:
    I lost my job as a cricket commentator for saying “I don’t want to bore you with the details”.Milton Jones
  • bert&erniebert&ernie Forumite
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    When I worked in retail the extortion, scare tactics, and outright violence came from the thieves who knew how soft the system was.

    The public image of absent minded little old ladies being brutalised by nasty store detectives is a complete myth. We are talking about scum; including one couple who used to hide stolen items in their child's pushchair.

    The police and CPS used to routinely not bother prosecuting. So if you own a shop and your profits are being stolen by scumbags every day, what do you do? You take civil proceedings to recover your property.

    Or would you be OK with people coming in your home and helping themselves to your possessions? Oh, that's different.

    Who do you think is more likely to pay the civil recovery demand - the 'absent minded old lady' or the 'scum'?
    The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts.
  • As I said, the absent minded old lady who inadvertently puts stuff in her bag, is almost non-existent. Chav scum who think they can walk into any shop and take what they want, then threaten violence, are sadly ten-a-penny. And they are rarely prosecuted.
    I was present at wreath-laying but don't think I was involved.
  • BigCraigJohnBigCraigJohn Forumite
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    I think people need to read the bbc links before getting all self righteous.
    It is the story of a man who went into B & Q, picked up 2 aerial wires, took them both from the sleeves to see which was correct, because he had his kids playing up he accidentally put them in the wrong sleeve. Difference in price was £1 odd on a £19 item.
    He paid and on the way out security stop him with his kids, call police, police agree its a mistake and take no action, 2 days later he received threatening letter for £130 followed by further contacts from debt collectors threatening all hell.

    He knew he had done nothing wrong so refused to pay but how many would just pay up?

    If he was a thief then fair enough he should be clobbered but as this and some other cases go it was not clear and there was no clear evidence.
  • bert&erniebert&ernie Forumite
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    As I said, the absent minded old lady who inadvertently puts stuff in her bag, is almost non-existent. Chav scum who think they can walk into any shop and take what they want, then threaten violence, are sadly ten-a-penny. And they are rarely prosecuted.

    You haven't answered my question, so I'll have a go myself.

    'Chav scum', as you put it, are not worried by the threat of civil recovery. However, absent minded pensioners, along with other vulnerable adults, the parents of teenagers and indeed anyone with a reputation to protect, will likely to be very worried if they receive a demand, regardless of guilt.

    Those most likely to pay up are the least likely to offend.

    Its most certainly not an effective way of preventing shoplifting. Recovering a small proportion of the losses may be seen as better than nothing, but a what cost to the reputation of the brands that employ this practice?

    Seems to me that the only real winners are the [STRIKE]lawyers[/STRIKE] speculative invoicers that do this kind of work.
    The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts.
  • Seems to me the only real winners are those who had their property stolen and want recompense.

    You would if it was your stuff, or someone you know had been threatened with violence.
    I was present at wreath-laying but don't think I was involved.
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