Heating options

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We are about to move into a property that still has the original heating system installed in the 1960s. It is a 3 bed semi, with concrete ground floor. There is a sitting room, dining room with extension and kitchen on the ground floor (the extension has patio doors on two sides), and upstairs 3 bed and bathroom. There is a water tank in the loft, and we want to replace this with a combi boiler or something so we can get rid of that. The existing heating system is in a cupboard in the kitchen with vents throughout the house, so not only is it old, it takes up a lot of space.

In an ideal world I'd love to get a wood burning stove, but the house has no chimney, so I assume there's no way around that?

Our main concern would be that it is economical and efficient to run once installed, so do we have any options other than radiators? I've heard about underfloor heating, but is that easy to maintain, and if it goes wrong do you have to dig up the floors?

Any suggestions gratefully received :beer:
Jwil
"If you can dream it, you can do it". Walt Disney

Comments

  • Ebe_Scrooge
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    If running costs are your primary concern, then there's nothing wrong with radiators. The main thing is that the system is flushed through when the new boiler is installed. As long as you go for a condensing boiler this will be about as efficient as you can get ( plumbers please correct me here, but I *think* that all new boilers will be condensing anyway ).

    Underfloor heating is nice in that you don't have radiators on the wall so it gives a "cleaner" look, but it'll be a lot more expensive to install. You also have to consider whether you want a "wet" or a "dry" system.

    If you really want a wood burner there's no reason why you can't have one, you would just need to get a proper vent / flue installed. But in terms of practicality and efficiency you won't go far wrong with a modern combi boiler.
  • muckybutt
    muckybutt Posts: 3,761 Forumite
    First Anniversary Combo Breaker
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    You can get external flues for use with multi fuel stoves, stainless steel ones are the norm.

    Then you could also go down the route of a new gas boiler, but there are also wood pellet boilers, these operate on the outside of your house so there is no boiler inside, they have a hopper which you can either put wood pellets in or some systems will accept corn barley and maize as well.

    Then theres air or ground source heating if you dont want to dig the garden up then air source heating, I have just had a.s.h. installed in my house and I am well impressed a lot of plumbers will put it down as its a specialist install more like an air con engineers job, there are also grants available for both the systems so might well be worth looking at.
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  • jwil
    jwil Posts: 19,337 Forumite
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    Thanks both for your replies, they are really helpful. I guess I'm going to have to do a lot more research to see what would be best.

    The problem I have with radiators is that from the layout of the house, they are going to have to go on all the 'decent' walls, exactly where we would want to put the furniture.

    It's nice to know we have other options!
    "If you can dream it, you can do it". Walt Disney
  • muckybutt
    muckybutt Posts: 3,761 Forumite
    First Anniversary Combo Breaker
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    Just a bit more, I have an energy meter fitted on the ashp system, running costs so far 40p p hour when system starts up and warms up, tis then drops to between 8 - 9 pph when the rads are warm and the water is hot.

    Im told that these systems are great for underfloor heating, so there ya go !
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  • DVardysShadow
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    jwil wrote: »
    The problem I have with radiators is that from the layout of the house, they are going to have to go on all the 'decent' walls, exactly where we would want to put the furniture.
    Radiators go on outside walls under windows, unless you like draughts.
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  • jwil
    jwil Posts: 19,337 Forumite
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    Radiators go on outside walls under windows, unless you like draughts.

    Really? (Sorry I am really dense about this subject :o) That will be a problem for us then as two of the rooms don't have an external wall for a radiator(the dining room and extension) and the front room has a huge window and I don't think the gap below would be big enough.

    Actually, thinking about it, some of the radiators in my current house are not on external walls, so we should be ok.
    "If you can dream it, you can do it". Walt Disney
  • gmgmgm
    gmgmgm Posts: 511 Forumite
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    Placing radiators isn't as simple as putting them randomly around the house- suggest talk to an expert or consider some more research.
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