Main site > MoneySavingExpert.com Forums > Household & Travel > In my home (includes DIY) MoneySaving > condensing combi boiler temperature setting (Page 1)

IMPORTANT! This is MoneySavingExpert's open forum - anyone can post

Please exercise caution & report any spam, illegal, offensive, racist, libellous post to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com

  • Be nice to all MoneySavers
  • All the best tips go in the MoneySavingExpert weekly email

    Plus all the new guides, deals & loopholes

  • No spam/referral links
or Login with Facebook
condensing combi boiler temperature setting
Closed Thread
Views: 27,905
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
# 1
want2bmortgage3
Old 23-03-2008, 11:33 PM
Serious MoneySaving Fan
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,870
Default condensing combi boiler temperature setting

well i can control the hot water and central heating temp's on my boilers control panel

i am happy with the water at 50 degrees as its just hot enough for a hot bath/shower, but not scalding

however, i'm unsure what to set the central heating to. ive tried 65 and 70. but my main concern is whats best to save money? is it better to blast it out hot for a shorter time, or have it on longer at a lower temperature?

also i have thermo valves on the radiators is it worth using these or have them all fully open ? if someone knows the most efficient way of controlling heating id love to know. for note, i dont have any room thermostats, just a heating timer (3 periods a day) and the rad valves.
want2bmortgage3 is offline
Report Post
# 2
Canucklehead
Old 24-03-2008, 8:07 AM
Fantastically Fervent MoneySaving Super Fan
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: South of Hadrian's Wall but London every so often.
Posts: 6,264
Default

Hi

As an installer I am working to this.... http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/...ating_controls

You need a room stat ideally.How long you run the system for depends on your use of the house , are you home all day or out? If you're not home all day turn it off.

If you have young children at home or the chance of an older person falling and getting stuck next to or against a rad then a lower temperature would be better. It will take longer for the house to heat up from cold though.


Corgi Guy.
Ask to see CIPHE (Chartered Institute of Plumbing & Heating Engineering)
Canucklehead is offline
Report Post
The Following User Says Thank You to Canucklehead For This Useful Post: Show me >>
# 3
want2bmortgage3
Old 24-03-2008, 10:21 AM
Serious MoneySaving Fan
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,870
Default

thanks for the reply. good article there, people need to know about this stuff. i'm after a little more detail though. i've currently got a basic timer connected to the boiler, drayton something. how easily could i fit a room thermostat? as you said it would be the best solution.

say i did fit one, i'd still be asking whether its more efficient to have the heating set at say 80c to bring the room up to temp quickly, or say 65c but take a lot longer?
want2bmortgage3 is offline
Report Post
# 4
want2bmortgage3
Old 24-03-2008, 12:35 PM
Serious MoneySaving Fan
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,870
Default

for example, say you've got your room thermostat set to 20c, then what is more efficient with all rad valves fully open:

- boiler sending water out at 80c and needing less time to reach the 20c
- boiler at a lower 65c but needing longer to get up to temp?
want2bmortgage3 is offline
Report Post
# 5
Canucklehead
Old 24-03-2008, 4:09 PM
Fantastically Fervent MoneySaving Super Fan
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: South of Hadrian's Wall but London every so often.
Posts: 6,264
Default

.
Quote:

If you have young children at home or the chance of an older person falling and getting stuck next to or against a rad then a lower temperature would be better. It will take longer for the house to heat up from cold though.
I thought that kind of answered your question . Yes run the boiler at near max . Turn the TRVs down to make the room comfortable for you.

I go to quite a few houses where all the TRVs are on max and no one seems to worry about it:confused:
Ask to see CIPHE (Chartered Institute of Plumbing & Heating Engineering)
Canucklehead is offline
Report Post
# 6
want2bmortgage3
Old 26-03-2008, 3:44 PM
Serious MoneySaving Fan
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,870
Default

hi canuckel
thanks or your reply, i just wonder though that turning up the boiler then turning the rads down with the valves might cost more due to the gas needed to keep the boiler at max temp
want2bmortgage3 is offline
Report Post
# 7
jteez
Old 31-01-2012, 12:58 PM
MoneySaving Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1
Default

I know this is an old thread but it is a useful one nevertheless so...

Basically you won't get a simple answer because it's complex and there's no simple answer.

I think superficially as Canucklehead said, the boiler is designed to run most efficiently at it's maximum tempurature. So there is your answer. The overhead of having the boiler up high I assume is out weighed by the benefits of radiator efficiency, etc....

However if it is a condensing boiler its important to ensure that the flow/return (at the boiler) doesn't exceed 20degC so that the boiler can maintain it's own maximum efficiency.

If it's a modulating boiler supporting openTherm, make sure you get an openTherm thermostat which not only turns the boiler on and off but also controls the boilers temperature to maintain max efficiency.

Modern wireless room thermostats are very easy to fit, if you are 'competent'... These still need a device wired close to the boiler. Many boilers are wired externally so no need to open the casing. However there is a risk of knackering the boiler computer if you wire it wrong.

With a thermostat you could continue to use the boilers timer, and have an additional temperature control (just to adjust weather you're sitting around and want it warmer or doing the cleaning and want it a little cooler).

But there are many ways to boost the efficiency of your system. But absolutely best is dealing with drafts (even just cracks in ceiling/wall plaster - easiest to test on cold windy days)

Multiple zones (separate bedrooms/living rooms) are great and relatively simple to install.

However if you're not sure about what you're doing, definitely best to get a gas safe central heating specialist. Though make sure your talk to the about efficiency to gauge their abilities because sadly as with every industry (not picking on plumbers) there are many people that just don't really care about what they do.

What temperatures did you decide on in the end, or have you upgraded to wet solar in the meant time
jteez is offline
Report Post
The Following User Says Thank You to jteez For This Useful Post: Show me >>
# 8
lanto
Old 06-03-2012, 5:15 PM
MoneySaving Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10
Default

Thanks jteez. Even though it is an old post people like me are still looking for good answers, yours has enough tech speak for me understand.
lanto is offline
Report Post
Closed Thread

Bookmarks
 
 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

 Forum Jump  

Contact Us - MoneySavingExpert.com - Archive - Privacy Statement - Top

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All times are GMT. The time now is 5:17 PM.

 Forum Jump  

Free MoneySaving Email

Top deals: Week of 17 December 2014

Get all this & more in MoneySavingExpert's weekly email full of guides, vouchers and Deals

GET THIS FREE WEEKLY EMAIL Full of deals, guides & it's spam free

Latest News & Blogs

Martin's Twitter Feed

profile

Cheap Travel Money

Find the best online rate for holiday cash with MSE's TravelMoneyMax.

Find the best online rate for your holiday cash with MoneySavingExpert's TravelMoneyMax.

MSE's Twitter Feed

profile