Main site > MoneySavingExpert.com Forums > Household & Travel > In my home (includes DIY) MoneySaving > "Secondary glazing" - does it work and ... (Page 1)

IMPORTANT! This is MoneySavingExpert's open forum - anyone can post

Please exercise caution & report any spam, illegal, offensive, racist, libellous post to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com

  • Be nice to all MoneySavers
  • All the best tips go in the MoneySavingExpert weekly email

    Plus all the new guides, deals & loopholes

  • No spam/referral links
or Login with Facebook
"Secondary glazing" - does it work and where to buy?
Closed Thread
Views: 29,500
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
# 1
3plus1
Old 21-03-2008, 7:47 AM
Serious MoneySaving Fan
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 801
Default "Secondary glazing" - does it work and where to buy?

My partner and I rent a flat together that has lovely old big windows through which all of our heat escapes. We have really big thick curtains up but they don't make a blind bit of difference. If we put the heating on in the living room, we can just about warm that room up okay, but the heating in the bedrooom just escapes out of the windows as the panel heater is unfortunately located directly below them.

I've been reading about "secondary glazing"; a type of plastic film you attack with a hairdryer that helps keep the heat in? The problem is, we've got single glazing and our flat is part of a listed building, so even if our landlord wanted to do something about the window panes he probably wouldn't be allowed to.

Has anyone had any experience with this glazing film? Does it work? Our bedroom is so cold at the moment, that even if the film only worked a little, it would make such a huge difference to us. Also, where's a good place to buy? We don't have a Focus or a Wickes near us, and I can't find anything on the B&Q website to indicate it might be worth a trip in store. (You need to drive to get to our local one - which I don't, so it takes some planning.)

Any advice appreciated.
3plus1 is offline
Report Post
# 2
03022242
Old 21-03-2008, 11:34 PM
MoneySaving Stalwart
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Sunny wales
Posts: 312
Default

i thought secondary glazing was an additional glass pane fixed to the original,

such as these timber windows with an additional glass pane fixed to the inside

Named after my cat, picture coming shortly
03022242 is offline
Report Post
The Following User Says Thank You to 03022242 For This Useful Post: Show me >>
# 3
ukwoody
Old 22-03-2008, 9:29 AM
MoneySaving Stalwart
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: West Wales
Posts: 518
Default

The film type secondary glazing is all but flipping useless. Yes it does help prevent a bit of draft which certainly helps, but it's thermal qualities are almost non existant. You may notice a slight improvment - at the cost of poor visability,noisy rattling and very tacky appearence from the outside. I tried it 20 years ago in my first flat and wished I'd never bothered.

Many years ago when I worked briefly in the DIY chain market we sold tons of the stuff - most custmers reported it as helpful but not really worth the effort and has to be thrown away after a few months.

It is a lot more expensive, but the glass method shown by the above poster is far superior and effective. It might be woth you talking nicely with your landlord and seeing if he is open to the idea of cost sharing somehow - sell it on the basis of improving his property for others when you move on, and getting you to stay now.

The fuel saving will be much better then with the plastic film.
Woody
ukwoody is offline
Report Post
The Following User Says Thank You to ukwoody For This Useful Post: Show me >>
# 4
3plus1
Old 22-03-2008, 6:29 PM
Serious MoneySaving Fan
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 801
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ukwoody View Post
It is a lot more expensive, but the glass method shown by the above poster is far superior and effective. It might be woth you talking nicely with your landlord and seeing if he is open to the idea of cost sharing somehow - sell it on the basis of improving his property for others when you move on, and getting you to stay now.
The main problem we have isn't actually cost - it's the fact that we live in a listed building and I can't see drilling things into the windows or replacing the panes being allowable by the council? Or have I got this totally wrong? We're in Scotland, by the way. :confused:
3plus1 is offline
Report Post
# 5
transplanted
Old 06-10-2008, 5:38 PM
MoneySaving Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 1
Default

I used to live in western Massachusetts, where the winters were much colder than the UK's. Putting the plastic film over the windows was a regular habit and it was well worth it. Mind you, this was in a climate where we put the built-in storm windows down every winter as well.

The storm windows provided a decent seal on the outside. The plastic film provided one on the inside as well, which meant that the air trapped between the two could act as insulation. I'm going to try it here, to see if it bolsters the effect of the draught seals I put in last year.

We used the plastic again year after year. The only thing that needed to be bought new was the double-sided adhesive tape. Our costs worked out to be less than a $2/year, plus an hour or so to put them up.

It's affordable and easily done.
transplanted is offline
Report Post
# 6
dander
Old 07-10-2008, 2:15 AM
Serious MoneySaving Fan
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 1,560
Default

I know people in listed buildings who have secondary glazed, so you'd be fine adding to the windows from that respect. Whether your landlord would be happy for you to do it is another matter entirely!

Although, my concern would be that if these rooms are so cold that really thick curtains aren't helping, I'm not convinced you'll see a great improvement from secondary glazing.

I wonder if your problem is more to do with inefficient heating not throwing out enough heat in the first place than all the heat disappearing through your windows.

I'm not sure what a panel heater is, but could you try some radiator foil behind it to help bounce the heat back into the room? And if it's below the window, with a radiator one would normally tuck the curtains behind the radiator to ensure the heat goes into the room rather than behind the curtains into the window area - is it safe to do this with your panel heater?
dander is offline
Report Post
# 7
wallbash
Old 07-10-2008, 8:00 AM
Deliciously Dedicated Diehard MoneySaving Devotee
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 15,671
Default

Quote:
a type of plastic film you attack with a hairdryer
Brilliant product
Its a draught sealer, watch the the film move!

Quote:
but it's thermal qualities are almost non existant
True, but its the draughts you are stopping.

Quote:
and has to be thrown away after a few months.
True .... but it will last a winter, renew next October


With the small cost , what have you got to lose.

Of course if it was my house ( not listed )
It would be proper glass secondary .
wallbash is online now
Report Post
# 8
poodlebra
Old 01-11-2008, 10:42 AM
MoneySaving Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 1
Default

We've lived in a listed flat with single, draughty glazing for three years now, and each winter the double glazing film goes on the two six foot high sash windows in the living room. It's a bit faffy to get on, but the benefits are immediate. A 6.99 pack from Wickes does both windows, and the living room is transformed. No draughts. The heat from the radiators beneath the windows stays in the room. Just about to go buy some to buckle ourselves in for this winter. (Of course, if we weren't renting I'd opt for proper internal secondary stuff.)
poodlebra is offline
Report Post
The Following User Says Thank You to poodlebra For This Useful Post: Show me >>
# 9
sweet_decline
Old 02-11-2008, 11:42 PM
MoneySaving Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 7
Default

Hi 3plus1

I got some of this stuff from Wilkinsons yesterday - a big pack for 9.99, although the small pack at 5.99 probably would have been enough for our three 80cm x 180cm windows.

We are in a rented flat too - mostly double glazed, except for the living room, which has draughty single glazed sash windows. Landlord claims he can't replace them because we are in a conservation area.

Anyway, I managed to get the film on the windows by myself in a couple of hours (bear in mind I'm a complete DIY novice - it would have been quicker with another pair of hands too). You put the double sided tape on first, then stick on the film. It does look pretty awful at first - like cling film over the windows. Realised how terribly draughty the windows are too - the film was rustling like mad.

You leave it for at least an hour, then aim a hairdryer a few inches from the film. It doesn't take long to become taught, and then it doesn't look noticeable at all (just the bit I managed to put a hole in and then had to patch - oops). It has made a difference in the room already - I was beginning to dread how much it would cost to heat through the winter.
sweet_decline is offline
Report Post
Closed Thread

Bookmarks
 
 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

 Forum Jump  

Contact Us - MoneySavingExpert.com - Archive - Privacy Statement - Top

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All times are GMT. The time now is 9:00 PM.

 Forum Jump  

Free MoneySaving Email

Top deals: Week of 17 December 2014

Get all this & more in MoneySavingExpert's weekly email full of guides, vouchers and Deals

GET THIS FREE WEEKLY EMAIL Full of deals, guides & it's spam free

Latest News & Blogs

Martin's Twitter Feed

profile

Cheap Travel Money

Find the best online rate for holiday cash with MSE's TravelMoneyMax.

Find the best online rate for your holiday cash with MoneySavingExpert's TravelMoneyMax.

MSE's Twitter Feed

profile