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How to put up a washing line?
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# 1
oldMcDonald
Old 12-02-2008, 8:40 AM
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Default How to put up a washing line?

Hi, after reading on another thread about washing lines, I'm after a little help.

Does anyone know how to put up a washing line using pulleys? We have a washing line with a pulley system that allows me to pull the washing up high, but I would really like to have one of those lines set up whereby you stand in one place and put the washing on the line, moving it along with the pulleys as you go (with you standing in the same place whilst putting it out). I have described that really badly so I hope someone knows what I mean!

DH did try to do this for me, but he lost his patience rafther quickly and put it up the way we have now instead!

Thanks if anyone can help




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# 2
Olliebeak
Old 12-02-2008, 8:53 AM
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I'm sure that those were just pulled along by hand, so would need two wheels fixed on opposite walls. The line would have to be tight to stop it from coming off the wheels and the wheels would have to be 'upright' if you know what I mean - not on their sides. The line would have to be double the length of the space so that it could be moved along.

From what I can remember from the old movies of those things, they were mostly used across communal areas and quite high up and that was why they were used.

Just googled and came up with this image - is this the sort of thing that you mean?

http://www.indexstock.com/store/Chub...Number=1109901
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# 3
oldMcDonald
Old 12-02-2008, 9:19 AM
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Hello Ollie

It is kind of like that!

I've seen them in a couple of backgardens, you have the two washing posts with a pulley at the top, and something similar to your piccy between the pulleys. You bring the line down to your level using the pulleys, then put the washing on the 'loop' (like in your picccy), then pull the washing up high.

At least, I think that this is how it works! We have spent ages studying peoples washing lines trying to work out how they did it, but neither of us is brave enough to knock the door and ask!!




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# 4
chez_ona
Old 12-02-2008, 11:16 AM
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Hi, I know the type of line you are talking about, my mum and dad have one. It's not really a loop - it only looks like that because people usually have two lines up. its actually two seperate lines.
They are secured to the wall/post at one end, then run over the top of a pully at the other end then down to a winder that allows you to tighten the line to raise it up.
Hope that makes sense to you - if you need a better explination let me know.
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# 5
JackieO
Old 12-02-2008, 12:33 PM
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I hope you manage to get it sorted as they are brilliant for drying things When my children were young back in the 1960s I had one that went from my first floor bedroom balcony to the bottom of the garden ( around 150 ft) and it was fixed quite high up on a Leylandii tree. I could get almost a full load on there and it would dry in around an hour .In those days I had two small girls and I loved to see 18 nappies blowing like mad in the breeze.The smell of fresh clothes from the washing line was fantastic and better than all the 'air-freshners ' that you could buy.I don't miss the tiny flat ,but I do miss that washing line .Apparently the higher you can get your washing the quicker it dries.
R.I.P Alan 17/5/1933-14/7/2003
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# 6
oldMcDonald
Old 12-02-2008, 6:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chez_ona View Post
Hi, I know the type of line you are talking about, my mum and dad have one. It's not really a loop - it only looks like that because people usually have two lines up. its actually two seperate lines.
They are secured to the wall/post at one end, then run over the top of a pully at the other end then down to a winder that allows you to tighten the line to raise it up.
Hope that makes sense to you - if you need a better explination let me know.
That is exactly what I want! I can't quite get how to put it up through your description, though. Please can you explian how the whole thing is put together? I am really excited now as I have found someone who knows what I am talking about!

Thank you




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# 7
Gingham Ribbon
Old 12-02-2008, 6:47 PM
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There should be some practical help on this in the 'in my home' section (which includes DIY) so I've moved your post over there for you.

I agree with Jackie. I LOVE seeing a couple of dozen terries nappies blowing on our washing lines.
May all your dots fall silently to the ground.
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# 8
oldMcDonald
Old 12-02-2008, 7:06 PM
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Thanks Gingham (TBH, I hadn't noticed the 'In my home' board before!)




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# 9
ormus
Old 12-02-2008, 10:12 PM
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im a bit confused here. first you said you wanted the clothesline to travel along. then you said you wanted a raising clothesline?

here is a sketch of a travel type line. pulley A is a twin pulley.
the actual line is a single continuous line.
Get some gorm.
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# 10
oldMcDonald
Old 13-02-2008, 6:43 AM
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Thank you ormus, I am not surprised I confused you as I mixed up two different kinds of line there! The line I am after goes up and down, not travelling along, I think I was hopeful that I may be able to do both!!

What I have at the moment is one line, tied to a post on one side of the garden and going over a pulley at the other, being wrapped around a hook to hold it in place.

What I am trying to rig up looks like it has a loop going up and down on either post (as with A-C in your picture), and a line srtung between them - at least this is what it looks like! The ropes going up and down are pulled into a triangle shape when the line is down.

I hope this makes sense, I am really bad at explaining things.




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# 11
chez_ona
Old 13-02-2008, 10:02 AM
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Sorry oldMcDonald I'm lost

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldMcDonald View Post
What I have at the moment is one line, tied to a post on one side of the garden and going over a pulley at the other, being wrapped around a hook to hold it in place.
this sounds exactly like the line I was trying to explain except instead of a hook to hold it in place at the end there is a winder a little like this. Thats really some kind of fishing reel - but my dad made his own - its the closest image i could find to explain it.

They just have two of these lines set up on a "T" shaped pole.

I'm a little confused by your "Triangle shape" maybe we are talking about different things. :confused:
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# 12
oldMcDonald
Old 13-02-2008, 11:15 AM
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We are talking about different things I think! I am pretty bad at explaining things and I have just tried to rewrite what I wrote above, but i cant!!

I like the idea of a little winder thing though, I hadn't thought of something like that.

Maybe if I forget about the type of line I am trying to explain and instead say what the problem is with our current system! Hopefully there will be someone who has a solution.

The main problem I have is that i need to get the line up high, our garden isn't very big and the washing line is fixed at one end to a 10ft high post and the other end is to a pully a few feet above the back door - there is nowhere else to put the line so we can't move it. To lower it I just unhook the line from a hook on the wall and to raise it I wind it round the hook When I put washing on the line (I have at least two loads a day), it is too heavy and I can't pull it up very high. Even with a prop halfway down it is still too low and gets in the way or kids/dogs swing off of it!

So I need to be able to pull the line up a couple of feet higher without giving myself a hernia pulling it! Maybe a winder would help? I can't be the only person who has this problem?




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# 13
chez_ona
Old 13-02-2008, 11:54 AM
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The winder should make it really easy to lift the washing (I accidentally broke our line a couple of times because I didn't realise how tight i had pulled it).

Below is the closest thing I can find to what my dad made - it has the same ratchet along the side that allows you to lock the line in place. Obvoiusly it's a little more heavy duty than you need but it's the right idea.

Hopefully someone might recognise it and suggest a better option for you.


I found it HERE
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# 14
ormus
Old 13-02-2008, 12:22 PM
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heres a sketch of a raising line. using simple parts such as scrap metal tubes.
prob make the main tubes say 22mm and the slide tubes make 28/30mm.
pulley A is a twin.
the C brackets can be welded on for a few quid.
instead of the bottom C bracket to tie off the line, a winch device is possible.
the main costs would be the pulleys.
Get some gorm.
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# 15
Grey Lady
Old 22-04-2008, 11:47 PM
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Please can you tell me if you eventually sorted this out and if so exactly how does it work as I would like one too!!
Many thanks
Grey Lady
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# 16
brigittejohn
Old 07-07-2009, 2:03 PM
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Default You can buy pulley washing lines...

... and others here:
www.ecowashinglines.co.uk

Look for post to wall, or wall to wall pulley washing line. It is quite expensive at 108 + VAT though!


This is the extract from their website:

The post to wall pulley washing line and clothesline system was designed to provide a natural and energy efficient alternative to drying your washing.

The post to wall system gives you the choice of installing the system just about wherever you want around the home as you have a post that can be mounted anywhere in your garden.

For more information on the post to wall washing line and clothes line system, refer to the specifications and features provided.


Price108.70
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