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  • FIRST POST
    Littlebean
    The Knitters Thread
    • #1
    • 1st Oct 07, 5:55 AM
    The Knitters Thread 1st Oct 07 at 5:55 AM
    Following on from the recent thread about handknitting it is apparent that many of us OS'ers are also keen knitters. The idea of this thread is to give us a place to post comments/suggestions, to be able to chat about our current work in progress (WIP), share patterns/tips/tricks, and post pictures of our completed work (I'm nosy and love seeing piccies ).

    I'll get the ball rolling: I've now finished knitting the sweater that sparked the original post. Now I've remembered just how much I disliked making up the finished garment -definately the worst part of knitting. I've managed to pick up and knit around the neck and I've done the collar, but now I have to work out how to set in the sleeves - hmmmmmm. Any suggestions/tips would be gratefully received. I've never knitted a sweater with shaped armholes before - having stuck to straight seams - but having splurged on the yarn I really want the finished product to look nice.
Page 455
    • nursemaggie
    • By nursemaggie 13th Apr 17, 5:40 PM
    • 1,653 Posts
    • 21,361 Thanks
    nursemaggie
    Welcome Jackie It looks like the others aren't around at the moment. This thread is always intermittent. There is more activity in Winter than Summer.

    I managed to get some yellow last week. When I go to the hospital the Age UK shop near the hospital has yarn at £1.45 a ball. They don't have a lot as they have mostly stopped selling it. This branch must have a decent turnover to keep getting it. Perhaps it is because it is near the most famous Cancer hospital in the world. There are lots of people having to sit around all day while they have treatment.

    They has two balls of Yellow last week. I need that colour for some Christmas things I will knit late this year. I think yellow is just not fashionable at the moment.

    You could have a look at any Age UK shops you come across.
    • shami
    • By shami 14th Apr 17, 8:05 PM
    • 52 Posts
    • 45 Thanks
    shami
    Long time lurker in this thread. Just a heads up that Deramores have free delivery until 16 April, no minimum spend. DK weight yarn starts from 89p. http://https://www.deramores.com/collections/all-yarn?q=&facets%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=category&facets%5B 0%5D%5Bname%5D=category1&facets%5B0%5D%5Bvalues%5D %5B0%5D=Knitting%20Yarn&facets%5B1%5D%5Btype%5D=te rms&facets%5B1%5D%5Bname%5D=custom_fields.weight&f acets%5B1%5D%5Bvalues%5D%5B0%5D=dk&sort%5B0%5D%5Bp rice%5D%5Border%5D=asc&offset=0
    • lynseydee
    • By lynseydee 14th Apr 17, 10:53 PM
    • 1,615 Posts
    • 7,429 Thanks
    lynseydee
    Nursemaggie hope your treatment is progressing OK, I have lymphodema which is a left over from my cancer treatment and found that if I don't knit then my right arm siezes up as its twice the size of my left one.

    I knit blankets for The Linus Trust which donates them to children all over the world who have nothing often than the clothes on their backs. I have been doing it for the past 8 years and have lost count of the amount I have knitted over the years, but I like to think that somewhere on this planet a child goes to sleep a little warmer for one of my 'blankies' as my DGS used to call them I find wool from all sorts of sources, often handknitted stuff at a boot sale which I will unravel and wash and reknit up (very handy for plain white wool which I use for edging the blankets.)

    I am always on the look out for inexpensive websites for DK wool and if anyone knows of any I would be grateful for a heads up. I have never seen wool in my local Aldi's or Lidl's but sometimes there is wool in Wilkos but for some reason never any yellow

    My friend crochets for the same charity and any left over bits of balls I knit in stripes to use them up nothing is ever wasted

    My grandchildren are now past the age for knitting things for and I am hoping I live long enough to have some gt.grandchildren then my needles will be clicking away again I did for awhile knit prem baby things for the local hospital in 3 and 4 ply as they were always looking for bits for the tiny little early babies.

    I really enjoy knitting, as I like to be doing something useful when watching TV

    Nice to see that there are other enthusiasts who like it as well

    JackieO xx
    Originally posted by JackieO
    Hi Jackie

    Poundland and Poundworld both sell 50g balls of wool. Not sure if they still have the offer but they were doing three balls for the price of two and obviously they're only a pound a ball :-)
    Did owe £9,951.96

    Now helping hubby pay off loan. Finally paid off

    Owe Virgin £5,950.00 at 0% til June 2009 £3,427.89. Owe HSBC £5,460.78 2.9% til May 2010 £3,703.07. Owe Post Office £1,676.62 at 0% til September 2010
    • JackieO
    • By JackieO 15th Apr 17, 10:59 AM
    • 14,785 Posts
    • 119,208 Thanks
    JackieO
    Thank you for the link shami I have bookmarked it and will probably get some as it looks really good and saves me hunting round the few shops that sell wool locally .I don't have a poundland near to me unfortunately and very few knitting shops , so free posting might be a good idea .I do sometimes find off bits in CS and I am off to lancashire for a weeks holiday next Friday and my friend and I search all of the chazzers when we are away as she likes material as she makes patchwork quilts for The Linus Charity as well. Nearest Age UK shop I think to me is around 10 miles away but I will check it out when I am next in the area.

    JackieO xx
    Quot Libra,Quam Breve Tempus.
    • nursemaggie
    • By nursemaggie 15th Apr 17, 12:09 PM
    • 1,653 Posts
    • 21,361 Thanks
    nursemaggie
    Mines around 30 miles Jackie but I have to go regularly and it takes hours to get there on public transport so I may as well go there everytime I go to the hospital.

    Pound shop yarn is very poor quality so I doubt if you want it anyway.
    • lynseydee
    • By lynseydee 15th Apr 17, 9:19 PM
    • 1,615 Posts
    • 7,429 Thanks
    lynseydee
    Mines around 30 miles Jackie but I have to go regularly and it takes hours to get there on public transport so I may as well go there everytime I go to the hospital.

    Pound shop yarn is very poor quality so I doubt if you want it anyway.
    Originally posted by nursemaggie
    My mum has bought some and it seems very good quality and knits up quite well
    Did owe £9,951.96

    Now helping hubby pay off loan. Finally paid off

    Owe Virgin £5,950.00 at 0% til June 2009 £3,427.89. Owe HSBC £5,460.78 2.9% til May 2010 £3,703.07. Owe Post Office £1,676.62 at 0% til September 2010
    • shami
    • By shami 16th Apr 17, 8:58 PM
    • 52 Posts
    • 45 Thanks
    shami
    Thank you for the link shami I have bookmarked it and will probably get some as it looks really good and saves me hunting round the few shops that sell wool locally .I don't have a poundland near to me unfortunately and very few knitting shops , so free posting might be a good idea .I do sometimes find off bits in CS and I am off to lancashire for a weeks holiday next Friday and my friend and I search all of the chazzers when we are away as she likes material as she makes patchwork quilts for The Linus Charity as well. Nearest Age UK shop I think to me is around 10 miles away but I will check it out when I am next in the area.

    JackieO xx
    Originally posted by JackieO
    You're very welcome 😊 But bear in mind delivery usually isn't free unless spending at least £25. Also if buying for the first time you can use the code 'HELLO' (without the apostrophes) to get a further 15% off.
    • misty6
    • By misty6 13th May 17, 5:01 PM
    • 66 Posts
    • 271 Thanks
    misty6
    Decreasing
    Hello knitters. I've just popped in for some advice please.


    When a pattern says to decrease is it the same as knitting 2 together? I always use knit 2 together for this but was wondering if there is another/better way to do it?


    Thank you
    Mortgage and debt free
    • hiddenshadow
    • By hiddenshadow 13th May 17, 5:24 PM
    • 2,129 Posts
    • 9,586 Thanks
    hiddenshadow
    There are a variety of decreases, k2tog is probably the easiest. There's also ssk (slip purlwise, slip purlwise, knit 2 together through the back loops).

    k2tog produces a right-leaning decrease, ssk produces a left-leaning decrease (pro tip: whichever way your needle is pointing through the stitches is the direction the combined stitch will lean). It might be irrelevant for your pattern, but some patterns rely on decreases leaning a certain way to produce the visual effect.
    MFW: Dec '13 £197,100 / Dec '14 £180,691 / Dec '15 £161,669 / Dec '16 £119,669 / June '17 £109,701 (£172 offset)
    Payment 41/84 / 2017 MFW #56: £9,967/£20,000 49% / MFiT-T4 #15: £49,798/£90,000 55%
    • misty6
    • By misty6 14th May 17, 12:07 AM
    • 66 Posts
    • 271 Thanks
    misty6
    Thank you for the info will google how to do them properly
    Mortgage and debt free
    • PipneyJane
    • By PipneyJane 14th May 17, 10:03 AM
    • 526 Posts
    • 3,255 Thanks
    PipneyJane
    There are a variety of decreases, k2tog is probably the easiest. There's also ssk (slip purlwise, slip purlwise, knit 2 together through the back loops).

    k2tog produces a right-leaning decrease, ssk produces a left-leaning decrease (pro tip: whichever way your needle is pointing through the stitches is the direction the combined stitch will lean). It might be irrelevant for your pattern, but some patterns rely on decreases leaning a certain way to produce the visual effect.
    Originally posted by hiddenshadow
    Thanks Hiddenshadow for the excellent descriptions.

    It's worth noting that SSK produces the same effect as "Slip 1, Knit 1, pass slip stitch over" (an instruction that often appears in older patterns).
    "Be the type of woman that when you get out of bed in the morning, the devil says 'Oh crap. She's up.' "

    C.R.A.P R.O.L.L.Z. #47 Official Brain Harvesting Body Counter
    • hiddenshadow
    • By hiddenshadow 14th May 17, 10:14 PM
    • 2,129 Posts
    • 9,586 Thanks
    hiddenshadow
    Thanks PipneyJane, I'd forgotten about that one (probably because I find passing stitches over to be a pain so I try to avoid them, haha).
    MFW: Dec '13 £197,100 / Dec '14 £180,691 / Dec '15 £161,669 / Dec '16 £119,669 / June '17 £109,701 (£172 offset)
    Payment 41/84 / 2017 MFW #56: £9,967/£20,000 49% / MFiT-T4 #15: £49,798/£90,000 55%
    • monnagran
    • By monnagran 16th May 17, 5:09 PM
    • 2,689 Posts
    • 33,883 Thanks
    monnagran
    Hi all, May I barge into your thread please? I don't know why I've never got involved before because I have been an enthusiastic knitter for 70 years, starting off with knitting dishcloths for mother and grandmother. I still can't really relax unless my fingers are busy. My friend tells me that I'm the only person she knows who can read and knit, watch T V and knit and in both cases have a cryptic crossword going on at the same time. I guess it's being of the generation for which the devil found mischief for idle hands.

    Anyway, I now have a query. My granddaughter, aged 4, is desperate to learn to knit. Now I have been bitten by this before, trying to teach small children at school to knit. I don't suppose it is part of the curriculum these days. If it ever was! It scarred me for ever. However, I'm about to cave in, against my better judgement. To add to the mix she is left handed.

    I was wondering if the continental style of knitting would be easier for her. It's something that I've never done so I would have to learn first - YouTube, I guess.

    Does anyone have any advice please?
    I believe that friends are quiet angels
    Who lift us to our feet when our wings
    Have trouble remembering how to fly.
    • monnagran
    • By monnagran 16th May 17, 5:14 PM
    • 2,689 Posts
    • 33,883 Thanks
    monnagran
    Hi all, May I barge into your thread please? I don't know why I've never got involved before because I have been an enthusiastic knitter for 70 years, starting off with knitting dishcloths for mother and grandmother. I still can't really relax unless my fingers are busy. My friend tells me that I'm the only person she knows who can read and knit, watch T V and knit and in both cases have a cryptic crossword going on at the same time. I guess it's being of the generation for which the devil found mischief for idle hands.

    Anyway, I now have a query. My granddaughter, aged 4, is desperate to learn to knit. Now I have been bitten by this before, trying to teach small children at school to knit. I don't suppose it is part of the curriculum these days. If it ever was! It scarred me for ever. However, I'm about to cave in, against my better judgement. To add to the mix she is left handed.

    I was wondering if the continental style of knitting would be easier for her. It's something that I've never done so I would have to learn first - YouTube, I guess.

    Does anyone have any advice please?
    I believe that friends are quiet angels
    Who lift us to our feet when our wings
    Have trouble remembering how to fly.
    • nursemaggie
    • By nursemaggie 16th May 17, 9:56 PM
    • 1,653 Posts
    • 21,361 Thanks
    nursemaggie
    Hi monna you could have asked on the garden fence. Seeing how your DGS is left handed the best thing you can get is a nice big mirror she can watch you knitting in it, it will look like it is left handed. Resist the temptation to take it off her and show her again when she looks awkward she will.

    I have never done any continental knitting but I am sure there are others who do.

    As for teaching children to knit at school it was part of the curriculum until the beginning of the 60s. I am sure I have seen it on a documentary where they had decided it was a good idea to go back to it as it teaches good hand and eye co-ordination so it helps them to learn to hold a pencil properly.
    • PipneyJane
    • By PipneyJane 17th May 17, 6:52 AM
    • 526 Posts
    • 3,255 Thanks
    PipneyJane
    Hi all, May I barge into your thread please? I don't know why I've never got involved before because I have been an enthusiastic knitter for 70 years, starting off with knitting dishcloths for mother and grandmother. I still can't really relax unless my fingers are busy. My friend tells me that I'm the only person she knows who can read and knit, watch T V and knit and in both cases have a cryptic crossword going on at the same time. I guess it's being of the generation for which the devil found mischief for idle hands.

    Anyway, I now have a query. My granddaughter, aged 4, is desperate to learn to knit. Now I have been bitten by this before, trying to teach small children at school to knit. I don't suppose it is part of the curriculum these days. If it ever was! It scarred me for ever. However, I'm about to cave in, against my better judgement. To add to the mix she is left handed.

    I was wondering if the continental style of knitting would be easier for her. It's something that I've never done so I would have to learn first - YouTube, I guess.

    Does anyone have any advice please?
    Originally posted by monnagran
    Hi Monaghan, welcome to the thread.

    While I have never taught a child to knit, I am left handed. I learned to knit right handed and, frankly, I don't see why your granddaughter can't learn to knit right handed. Knitting doesn't require fine motor movement, unlike writing, and it's a good thing, developmentally, to learn to do some tasks with your wrong hand. Yes, it will feel odd but it is an entirely new skill, so it's bound to be difficult and feel odd regardless of which style you use. Note: if she tucks her right thumb under the needle like a pen, it will be much easier to control and harder to drop. (Look up "Australian style knitting" on YouTube.)

    There are at least three different styles of Continental knitting. I find it harder to purl when doing Continental but that may be just me. (I can't keep a rhythm.)
    "Be the type of woman that when you get out of bed in the morning, the devil says 'Oh crap. She's up.' "

    C.R.A.P R.O.L.L.Z. #47 Official Brain Harvesting Body Counter
    • anakat
    • By anakat 17th May 17, 8:17 AM
    • 247 Posts
    • 1,211 Thanks
    anakat
    Have you thought of starting her off with an old fashioned Knitting Nancy?
    • monnagran
    • By monnagran 17th May 17, 10:05 AM
    • 2,689 Posts
    • 33,883 Thanks
    monnagran
    Thank you for your help. I really think that she is a bit too young but she is so keen that I don't like to put her off.

    nursemaggie, the mirror idea is inspired but I think it might confuse me! At the moment I can guide her fingers but if I am trying to guide them back to front for me I think we would both end up frustrated.

    PipneyJane, Thanks for the tucking the thumb under tip. We will try that. She is not too advanced with her fine motor control so knitting can only help. Now if it was talking! Or drama............we are speaking of genius level.

    Oh Anakat, how well I remember banging pins into a cotton reel and making yards and yards of woolly tubing. In the absence of wooden cotton reels I believe that they now produce plastic replicas. I'll look out for one, she might find that fun.

    The problem with the comtinental knitting is that she wants to knit "just like Monna." After a long lifetime of knitting I'm not sure that I can adapt to a different method.

    I'm not too sure why my last post decided to repeat itself 5 minutes after I had submitted it. Let's hope you don't get a double dose of this one.
    I believe that friends are quiet angels
    Who lift us to our feet when our wings
    Have trouble remembering how to fly.
    • THIRZAH
    • By THIRZAH 17th May 17, 2:56 PM
    • 1,284 Posts
    • 5,891 Thanks
    THIRZAH
    I tried to teach my GS to knit a scarf for his teddy when he was four but he struggled and we gave up. I think his hands were just too small. In the end I had to knit the scarf under his supervision-lots of "is it done yet, Grandma?"
    • monnagran
    • By monnagran 17th May 17, 3:06 PM
    • 2,689 Posts
    • 33,883 Thanks
    monnagran
    I know what you mean Thirzah. My little Pickle appeared in my doorway on her way to bed and announced that she would like to wear a long, pink princess dress to nursery the next day and would I please knit one. I said that it might be difficult to get a long princess dress finished in time.
    She thought for a moment and then said kindly, "All right. Just a pair of shoes then."

    Monna, thy name is Rapunzal.
    I believe that friends are quiet angels
    Who lift us to our feet when our wings
    Have trouble remembering how to fly.
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