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  • FIRST POST
    Loch37408
    Leaving fluorescent lights switched on at home…
    • #1
    • 13th Oct 04, 7:46 PM
    Leaving fluorescent lights switched on at home… 13th Oct 04 at 7:46 PM
    Leaving fluorescent lights switched on at home…

    Hello,

    Now, I know as good Money Savers we should all be leaving lights switched off at home whenever we leave the room.

    However, I remember being told a long long time ago that fluorescent lighting uses more energy when it is being switched on that than it does for it to be kept running for a number of hours, is this correct or an urban myth?

    If you are going to go back into the room within a hour it is cheaper to leave it switched on, is this correct or a old wives tale?!

    TIA
Page 2
    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 25th Jan 06, 2:52 PM
    • 27,109 Posts
    • 13,222 Thanks
    Cardew
    While I wouldn't consider myself a green fundamentalist, it seems irrational not to build dwellings that use as little energy as possible if technology enables you to do so. I recognise installing a turbine of solar panels will cost me a few thousand, but if they add to the property value, decrease my energy bills and have a reasonable longevity (irrespective of the environmental benefits) surely this is the logical long term choice, rather than being at the whim of energy generators' tarrifs or shelling out my part of the several billion £ in taxation that will otherwise be spent on new power stations?

    I'd love to know if anyone has ventured down this path and tried to make their home as zero emission friendly as possible? Oh and in the meantime a cheap reliable supplier of Energy efficient GU10 bulbs would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks
    by Sybarite
    There are a couple of threads about the economics of alternative energy sources.

    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.html?t=30987

    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.html?t=117656

    IMO there is absolutely no way solar or wind energy makes economic sense for a home owner.
    • ikr2
    • By ikr2 21st Feb 06, 11:07 PM
    • 140 Posts
    • 24 Thanks
    ikr2
    My entire flat has GU10 Halogen bulbs, about 36 in total, and I would never recommend them.
    by Sybarite
    Yes, GU10 energy savers are now on the market. As you say the bad news is that are expensive (£10 each) and they may be bigger than the GU10 Halogens that they are intended to replace. This is rather like the early low energy replacements for tungsten filament bulbs. Only recently have you been able to buy similar sized energy savers to replace the 60W lightbulbs.

    The economics look good. We have 7 GU10 fittings in our kitchen. If they are on for an average of 4 hrs a day, that's 4x7x50Wx365 = 511 KWh per year

    If I replace them with 9W energy savers energy use falls to 92 KWh per year. At 9p per KWhr that's a saving of just under £38 a year. A conservative estimate of a 5 year lifetime gives £190 saved for a £70 outlay. The only issues are that these are quite new and pricey. I also don't know what their "warm-up" time is like. The latest energy savers are pretty good at this now but these are a new type. I have a stock of normal GU10s to use up so I'll probably wait until they've gone and see what the market is like.

    Another way to reduce your energy usage is to use 35W GU10s instead of 50W equivalents. I buy mine from www.ricamstore.co.uk and the 2000hr lifetime rating means I don't have to change them as often and get better value. For the kitchen set-up, a saving of 15W per bulb is 153 KWhr per year or about £14. The 35W bulbs are generally the same price as 50W and I don't notice much difference in the brightness, although you pay a bit more for the 2000hr lifetime, it's not double the price of the 1000hr bulbs
    • hansi
    • By hansi 22nd Feb 06, 7:31 AM
    • 2,899 Posts
    • 569 Thanks
    hansi
    Halogen Bulbs
    I have been reading these posts about halogen bulbs as we have just had one fitted in the kitchen with six bulbs. When replacing the bulbs you MUST use the correct pressure bulbs. I use the wrong one and it exploded. Very dangerous. When you buy replacements, please make sure that you have the correct replacement. The low pressure bulbs have a special mark on them.
    • Pegleg2001
    • By Pegleg2001 22nd Feb 06, 5:09 PM
    • 96 Posts
    • 19 Thanks
    Pegleg2001
    Energy Urban Myths
    Latest research here on the topic - and others of a similar nature:

    http://www.nef.org.uk/energyadvice/mythstruths.htm
    The Pegster

    Quote-of-the-day: "A fool and his money were lucky to get together in the first place"
  • exil
    Sometimes I wonder if people have any basic maths. If a light uses 100W, but uses 500W for 2 seconds when switching on:-

    Leaving a light on for 24 hours willl use 2.4 kw hours.

    Switching it on, leaving it on for 4 hours and switching it off will use a fraction over
    0.4 kw hours.

    For it to be cheaper to leave the light on, it would have to use several megawatts of power when warming up and would fuse the entire neighbourhood!
  • exil
    Heh, Heh - this is very similar to the thread on energy saving light bulbs where I argued that as all the 'wasted' heat was diffused into the surrounding area i.e. heating up the building, the (during winter at any rate) energy wasn't being wasted at all, because your heating bills would be that much lower...

    So that's 50% one can slash off the quoted energy saving rates - I was suprised that nobody questioned the fact that energy companies promote the darn things - yet more green propaganda.

    I guess they are happy for a misguided change because it raises general awareness of energy saving? !Or do they really believe it makes a big difference?
    by zcaprd7
    A 100W bulb can be replaced by an energy-saving one, say 40W. The 60W difference won't be enough to make you turn down your gas fire. I suppose if you have accurately set room thermostats you might save a little - but electricity is 4 times the price of gas per unit of energy!
  • Duffer
    Anyone had a problem with these (halogen) lights that they intermittently turn themselves off, only to turn themselves on again seconds / minutes later? We have a circuit with 3 lights on, and one spends about half the time off, one about 10% off and one is mostly on. Not sure whether to look at the circuits or the bulbs?
    Originally posted by sjh1008
    It sounds lik there is a safety cut out operating on your transformer. This will usually be because the transformer is overloaded or is getting too hot where it is mounted. It should state on the transformer what load it can supply - anything from 20w to hundreds of watts. It may quote VA rather than watts, but they are to all intents and purposes interchangeable in this case. Check that the total load supplied by the transformer does not exceed this rating. It is common for people to buy a three light kit from a DIY store that comes with a 60w transformer and three 20w lamps. Then when the lamps blow they replace them with 35, 50 or even 75w lamps and the transformers tend to overheat, tripping the cutout, which when the transformer cools down again resets and the lights magically come back on.
    However, if you have separate transformers serving your three lights, check each lamp is the correct rating for the transformers. The next probable cause is the lampholder - the cheaper ones have a tendency to fail very quickly as they get very hot in use. You should try swapping lamps and see if the problem stays with the lamp or the fitting. If it moves with the lamp, you have the last major cause of problems, a prblem with the one or both of the pins on the lamp. They too get very hot and can fail just inside the glass envelope - see if they wobble a bit, if so they they are probably making a bad connection which shows up as intermitttent flickering or complete failure when they get hot. Like many things in life, you tend to get what you pay for. So the very cheap lamps and lampholders have a far higher failure rate than the good qulity branded items. However, spare lampholders are pretty cheap, as little as £2.49 from Maplin or try PC for better quality ones. Also I have found GU5.3 holders much more reliable as they have a spring clip that holds the lampholder firmly in position on the lamp. Hope this helps.
  • Duffer
    It sounds lik there is a safety cut out operating on your transformer. This will usually be because the transformer is overloaded or is getting too hot where it is mounted. It should state on the transformer what load it can supply - anything from 20w to hundreds of watts. It may quote VA rather than watts, but they are to all intents and purposes interchangeable in this case. Check that the total load supplied by the transformer does not exceed this rating. It is common for people to buy a three light kit from a DIY store that comes with a 60w transformer and three 20w lamps. Then when the lamps blow they replace them with 35, 50 or even 75w lamps and the transformers tend to overheat, tripping the cutout, which when the transformer cools down again resets and the lights magically come back on.
    However, if you have separate transformers serving your three lights, check each lamp is the correct rating for the transformers. The next probable cause is the lampholder - the cheaper ones have a tendency to fail very quickly as they get very hot in use. You should try swapping lamps and see if the problem stays with the lamp or the fitting. If it moves with the lamp, you have the last major cause of problems, a prblem with the one or both of the pins on the lamp. They too get very hot and can fail just inside the glass envelope - see if they wobble a bit, if so they they are probably making a bad connection which shows up as intermitttent flickering or complete failure when they get hot. Like many things in life, you tend to get what you pay for. So the very cheap lamps and lampholders have a far higher failure rate than the good qulity branded items. However, spare lampholders are pretty cheap, as little as £2.49 from Maplin or try PC for better quality ones. Also I have found GU5.3 holders much more reliable as they have a spring clip that holds the lampholder firmly in position on the lamp. Hope this helps.
    Originally posted by Duffer
    Sorry, should say CPC for the better quality lampholders. Must proof read before hitting that submit button.
  • gbjoce1
    Hi I have just bought a water feature for the garden that has three little LED lights. I have been unplugging the lights during the day and plugging them back in at night. Is this a good idea. Would they last longer if i just left them plugged in all of the time?
  • mute_posting
    LED's tend to have a life of 100,000 hours + so they should be good for 10+ years continual use (they may dim to 50% of original output over time)

    If they are LED lights they will probably be consuming less than 5watts in total.

    So, assuimg they ARE 5 watts TOTAL, and ASSUMING you pay an average of 10p / unit of electricity, they will cost you the princely sum of £4.38 to have illuminated all year.

    HTH

    MP
    :confused: I have a poll / discussion on Economy 7 / 10 off-peak usage (as a % or total) and ways to improve it but I'm not allowed to link to it so have a look on the gas/elec forum if you would like to vote or discuss.
    • The Miser
    • By The Miser 16th Jan 11, 5:58 PM
    • 60 Posts
    • 33 Thanks
    The Miser
    The original thread was about fluorescent tubes which seems to inclkude the modern mercury vapour bulbs which are now effectively compulsory. Do the mrcow
    13-10-2004, 9:28 PM statements apply to the new lights.
    Since mine fail regularly where should I get rid of them as the council refuse them?
    • savemoney
    • By savemoney 16th Jan 11, 11:11 PM
    • 12,841 Posts
    • 11,441 Thanks
    savemoney
    Not sure my local council tip take them we have to put them in a long case to slide them in so they dont break



    Since mine fail regularly where should I get rid of them as the council refuse them?
    Originally posted by The Miser
  • AAbbananana
    I didn't know about switching them on could save energy. Is this a fact?
    I need help...
  • archived user
    It's the resurrection shuffle!
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