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  • FIRST POST
    • C_Ronaldo
    • By C_Ronaldo 17th Dec 07, 4:22 PM
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    C_Ronaldo
    Bald tyres on a car
    • #1
    • 17th Dec 07, 4:22 PM
    Bald tyres on a car 17th Dec 07 at 4:22 PM
    If you get stopped by the police and they inspect your tyres can they give you a fine or points on your licence or both if the tyres are bald
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    • takman
    • By takman 6th Apr 17, 12:29 PM
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    takman
    Tread doesn't affect the "structural integrity" of the tyre. The sidewall, yes absolutely, but not the tread.


    The two things are simply not related. One does not affect the other. They are both affected by use, obviously, but they are not the same.

    The rules on tread are very silly imo, I really can't see why you aren't allowed slick tyres, but them's the rules I suppose.




    My brother was once in town and managed to insult a police officer, the officer then spent 15 minutes checking every single little thing on his car until he found something to issue a fine with; he found one of the tyres was only 1.5mm tread, and fined him and forced him to get the car towed home.
    Originally posted by kmb500

    You can't have slick tyres because they have very poor grip in wet conditions!.
    Also your brother had illegal tyres on his car so it's a good thing that the police checked the car and found that out.
    • Nasqueron
    • By Nasqueron 6th Apr 17, 12:37 PM
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    Nasqueron
    Eh, from my brother's side of the story I am with him. He was just standing outside his parked car on an empty street, waiting to pick up some friends, and the police officers were asking him what he's doing. He told them it's none of their business and he had a right to be there, and that prompted them to act like absolute !!!!!!!!s. Last time I checked its not a crime to stop your car late at night. Guess they had nothing better to do than to bully a 17 year old new driver.
    Originally posted by kmb500
    As I said, failed the attitude test.

    Bet you a tenner what he told you was not what he actually said. Lurking around a car on an empty street flags up suspicious behaviour like he might be trying to break in. If he simply said he was there to pick up a friend and was getting some fresh air and was polite they'd have let him go. Soon as you give lip to the police they'll be on your case.

    Oh and yeah, police protecting the public from a car that wasn't legal and safe
    • scaredofdebt
    • By scaredofdebt 6th Apr 17, 12:37 PM
    • 896 Posts
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    scaredofdebt
    Eh, from my brother's side of the story I am with him. He was just standing outside his parked car on an empty street, waiting to pick up some friends, and the police officers were asking him what he's doing. He told them it's none of their business and he had a right to be there, and that prompted them to act like absolute !!!!!!!!s. Last time I checked its not a crime to stop your car late at night. Guess they had nothing better to do than to bully a 17 year old new driver.
    Originally posted by kmb500
    If he'd simply said he was waiting to pick up some friends he would have saved himself some hassle. Hopefully lesson learned.

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    • kmb500
    • By kmb500 6th Apr 17, 12:57 PM
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    kmb500
    If he'd simply said he was waiting to pick up some friends he would have saved himself some hassle. Hopefully lesson learned.

    Originally posted by scaredofdebt
    Shouldn't have to though, the police do not have a right to know your personal information unless there's a reason, they can't just ask you anything and you have to answer them. We don't live in a police state. I would do the same albeit probably in a more polite manner than my brother.
    • takman
    • By takman 6th Apr 17, 1:07 PM
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    takman
    Shouldn't have to though, the police do not have a right to know your personal information unless there's a reason, they can't just ask you anything and you have to answer them. We don't live in a police state. I would do the same albeit probably in a more polite manner than my brother.
    Originally posted by kmb500


    They were only asking him what he was doing and he replied in a rude and defensive manner saying "it's none of their business and he had a right to be there".
    Yes your right he didn't have to tell them but there is nothing wrong with the police asking and i think the police should do more of it if people look like they are up to no good.


    I bet if someone had caused damage to your car and the police had just walked past them a few minutes before and didn't say anything to them you would soon be complaining!.
    • Joe Horner
    • By Joe Horner 6th Apr 17, 1:16 PM
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    Joe Horner
    Shouldn't have to though, the police do not have a right to know your personal information unless there's a reason, they can't just ask you anything and you have to answer them. We don't live in a police state. I would do the same albeit probably in a more polite manner than my brother.
    Originally posted by kmb500

    Absolutely agree that you shouldn't (and, in fact, don't) "have to".

    But, if you want to invoke your right to not tell them then it pays to be absolutely 100% certain that you're not, in fact, doing anything wrong at the time such as driving round on a below-limit tyre.

    Essentially, if you insist on your (legitimate) right to make their job harder then they're perfectly entitled to insist on their (legitimate) duty to enforce the law to the letter.
    • straggler
    • By straggler 19th Apr 17, 7:32 AM
    • 112 Posts
    • 10 Thanks
    straggler
    Tread doesn't affect the "structural integrity" of the tyre. The sidewall, yes absolutely, but not the tread.


    The two things are simply not related. One does not affect the other. They are both affected by use, obviously, but they are not the same.

    The rules on tread are very silly imo, I really can't see why you aren't allowed slick tyres, but them's the rules I suppose.


    My brothewas once in town and managed to insult a police officer, the officer then spent 15 minutes checking every single little thing on his car until he found something to issue a fine with; he found one of the tyres was only 1.5mm tread, and fined him and forced him to get the car towed home.
    Originally posted by kmb500



    Tyres are designed to be run with tread. Running without tread risks overheating and catastrophic failure. But you are welcome to find this out the hard way.....

    Why aren't you allowed to drive on slick tyres? Is that a serious question?!
    • straggler
    • By straggler 19th Apr 17, 7:38 AM
    • 112 Posts
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    straggler
    It doesn't matter whether or not there's "much of an industry" (which is mainly down to the availability of cheap Chinese brands pushing them out of the market). What matters is that there is an industry - it even has it's own industry association right here in the UK:

    http://retreaders.org.uk/retreading/questions-answered/

    You can, if you wish, buy remoulds up to V rated (149mph) from plenty of Uk suppliers:

    https://www.google.co.uk/#q=v+rated++remould&tbm=shop&*

    Perhaps you haven't done your research before posting so. in case you weren't aware, remoulds are made from tyres which have already worn out their original tread. If the carcass was designed to "wear out" at the same point then they wouldn't be allowed.

    It really is as simple as that.
    Originally posted by Joe Horner

    You are clearly not going to believe anything I say. Even if I told you what I do for a living you would probably insist that you are still right. So what I suggest you do is contact Michelin, Bridgestone or similar and ask them about the risk of overheating and failure, structural integrity and their technical opinion of remoulding/retreading, the chemical reactions that happen in tyres over time etc.

    Or you could take your car with its bald tyres to a track day and thrash around for a bit. Don't forget to book a recovery truck to take you home......
    • straggler
    • By straggler 19th Apr 17, 7:50 AM
    • 112 Posts
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    straggler
    Shouldn't have to though, the police do not have a right to know your personal information unless there's a reason, they can't just ask you anything and you have to answer them. We don't live in a police state. I would do the same albeit probably in a more polite manner than my brother.
    Originally posted by kmb500

    If the police had asked him what he was doing and he'd told them he probably wouldn't even have been asked for his personal information.
    • Joe Horner
    • By Joe Horner 19th Apr 17, 8:29 AM
    • 4,080 Posts
    • 3,559 Thanks
    Joe Horner
    You are clearly not going to believe anything I say. Even if I told you what I do for a living ...
    Originally posted by straggler
    No, you telling me that really wouldn't make much of a difference, and neither would the partisan line of manufacturers with a vested interest in selling new tyres.

    The facts are quite simple. If those makers could provide solid evidence that the risks of retreading a tyre carcass were unacceptable then remoulds would be illegal.

    They're not only legal throughout the world, the US actually requires federal vehicles to use them when available under EO 13149.

    As for your last bit, where have I (seriously) advocated continuing to run on tyres with worn out tread without remoulding first?
    • Retrogamer
    • By Retrogamer 19th Apr 17, 4:48 PM
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    • 3,762 Thanks
    Retrogamer
    Shouldn't have to though, the police do not have a right to know your personal information unless there's a reason, they can't just ask you anything
    Originally posted by kmb500
    They pretty much can. But you don't have to answer..

    We don't live in a police state. I would do the same albeit probably in a more polite manner than my brother.
    Originally posted by kmb500
    It's what Police officers call the "attitude test"
    If you are cheeky or aren't compliant, don't be surprised if they start going over the car with a fine toothcomb until they find something wrong...and they usually do
    • kmb500
    • By kmb500 19th Apr 17, 5:26 PM
    • 380 Posts
    • 99 Thanks
    kmb500
    Tyres are designed to be run with tread. Running without tread risks overheating and catastrophic failure. But you are welcome to find this out the hard way.....

    Why aren't you allowed to drive on slick tyres? Is that a serious question?!
    Originally posted by straggler
    Yes its a serious question, I don't know much about physics but I would have thought that when there's more tyre (i.e. not full of gaps/tread) there's more friction so more grip. Formula 1 cars drive on slicks and they can go faster round corners due to their grip than anything else out there.
    • Retrogamer
    • By Retrogamer 19th Apr 17, 5:50 PM
    • 3,767 Posts
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    Retrogamer
    Interestly i had a set of semi budget tyres that were close to the legal limit but still gripped very well, even in the wet.

    I put on a set o brand new budget tires and even though there was much more tread, i had about 50% less traction in the wet.....
    • macman
    • By macman 19th Apr 17, 6:13 PM
    • 41,291 Posts
    • 16,954 Thanks
    macman
    Yes its a serious question, I don't know much about physics but I would have thought that when there's more tyre (i.e. not full of gaps/tread) there's more friction so more grip. Formula 1 cars drive on slicks and they can go faster round corners due to their grip than anything else out there.
    Originally posted by kmb500
    But only until it starts raining...
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    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 19th Apr 17, 7:20 PM
    • 2,325 Posts
    • 1,530 Thanks
    Johnmcl7
    But only until it starts raining...
    Originally posted by macman
    Yep, this is from near the end of the Blancpain 24 at Spa last year when it started raining and the cars didn't even manage to make it back to the pits before they were sliding about like they were on ice:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y9boXa4Jtts
    • rich13348
    • By rich13348 19th Apr 17, 7:41 PM
    • 796 Posts
    • 419 Thanks
    rich13348
    Yes its a serious question, I don't know much about physics but I would have thought that when there's more tyre (i.e. not full of gaps/tread) there's more friction so more grip. Formula 1 cars drive on slicks and they can go faster round corners due to their grip than anything else out there.
    Originally posted by kmb500
    The gaps/tread is to allow water to escape out so there is grip. If there is no tread and no way to let water out you very quickly start aquaplaning.

    F1 cars also have very sticky slick tyres that need to be at a specific temperature to work, hence the jackets and the weaving from side to side to warm them up. And they only last half or third of a race and need changed.

    Do you want to put new tyres on every 50 miles?
    • kmb500
    • By kmb500 19th Apr 17, 9:40 PM
    • 380 Posts
    • 99 Thanks
    kmb500
    The gaps/tread is to allow water to escape out so there is grip. If there is no tread and no way to let water out you very quickly start aquaplaning.

    F1 cars also have very sticky slick tyres that need to be at a specific temperature to work, hence the jackets and the weaving from side to side to warm them up. And they only last half or third of a race and need changed.

    Do you want to put new tyres on every 50 miles?
    Originally posted by rich13348
    thanks, that makes sense.

    on a dry flat road do slick or tready tyres have more grip, out of interest?
    • Car 54
    • By Car 54 19th Apr 17, 10:28 PM
    • 2,221 Posts
    • 1,419 Thanks
    Car 54
    Yes its a serious question, I don't know much about physics but I would have thought that when there's more tyre (i.e. not full of gaps/tread) there's more friction so more grip. Formula 1 cars drive on slicks and they can go faster round corners due to their grip than anything else out there.
    Originally posted by kmb500
    Schoolboy physics teaches you that friction is independent of area! See http://www.dummies.com/education/science/physics/how-surface-area-affects-the-force-of-friction/
    • Nasqueron
    • By Nasqueron 19th Apr 17, 10:40 PM
    • 4,179 Posts
    • 2,330 Thanks
    Nasqueron
    thanks, that makes sense.

    on a dry flat road do slick or tready tyres have more grip, out of interest?
    Originally posted by kmb500
    Anecdotally from riding a bike, tread tyres are harder to get to speed and more work to keep going vs slicks, the difference between a 35mm knobbly tyre and 25mm slick is huge, I'd say more grip on the tread tyre
    • Joe Horner
    • By Joe Horner 19th Apr 17, 11:14 PM
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    Joe Horner
    Schoolboy physics teaches you that friction is independent of area! See http://www.dummies.com/education/science/physics/how-surface-area-affects-the-force-of-friction/
    Originally posted by Car 54
    That holds for smooth surfaces but a tyre's grip is augmented by "mooulding" itself into the lumps & bumps of the tarmac which is why you get a lot less grip on a worn out road surface than a new one. That element of their grip is affected by area,
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