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    • Corona
    • By Corona 14th Feb 18, 11:56 AM
    • 841Posts
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    Corona
    Privet hedge
    • #1
    • 14th Feb 18, 11:56 AM
    Privet hedge 14th Feb 18 at 11:56 AM
    We have a healthy privet hedge in our garden which gets cut twice a year. But it's getting a bit thin at the bottom with lots of gaps. The bloke who cuts it said "just take off some cuttings and stick them in the ground in the gaps; they'll soon be away". Of course, I didn't ask him what time of the year to do this! Also, I was wondering if they'd have a better chance if I started them off indoors and then planted out a slightly bigger plant? (I don't have a greenhouse or cold frame).

    Anyone ever done this successfully?
Page 1
    • DaftyDuck
    • By DaftyDuck 14th Feb 18, 2:03 PM
    • 3,971 Posts
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    DaftyDuck
    • #2
    • 14th Feb 18, 2:03 PM
    • #2
    • 14th Feb 18, 2:03 PM
    Yeah, privet takes cuttings like Boris likes publicity. This time of year is ideal, although try and avoid the worst frost and cold. Harder wood bits (so not the highly flexible green bits) about six inches long. Clean cut on the end. Bung them in. They will mostly take. I once had a ready made hedge prior to a house move growing in three large plastic paint buckets.

    You can also use the younger greenwood for cuttings, but that needs to be planted in the growing season, say April onwards. These will do better if started in putting compost rather than in the hedge.

    From a small hedge, you can make thousands of cuttings!
    • Corona
    • By Corona 14th Feb 18, 3:02 PM
    • 841 Posts
    • 790 Thanks
    Corona
    • #3
    • 14th Feb 18, 3:02 PM
    • #3
    • 14th Feb 18, 3:02 PM
    Yeah, privet takes cuttings like Boris likes publicity. This time of year is ideal, although try and avoid the worst frost and cold. Harder wood bits (so not the highly flexible green bits) about six inches long. Clean cut on the end. Bung them in. They will mostly take. I once had a ready made hedge prior to a house move growing in three large plastic paint buckets.

    You can also use the younger greenwood for cuttings, but that needs to be planted in the growing season, say April onwards. These will do better if started in putting compost rather than in the hedge.

    From a small hedge, you can make thousands of cuttings!
    Originally posted by DaftyDuck
    Thanks this is really useful (and agree about Boris!)
    • Justagardener
    • By Justagardener 14th Feb 18, 3:08 PM
    • 99 Posts
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    Justagardener
    • #4
    • 14th Feb 18, 3:08 PM
    • #4
    • 14th Feb 18, 3:08 PM
    I have always been a big advocate of bulking the garden up with cuttings too, But when bulking out hedges in the past I have bought 2ft whips and slotted them in. You can do this until roughly the end of Feb and you can pick them up for about £1.60 A plant.
    • unrecordings
    • By unrecordings 14th Feb 18, 3:55 PM
    • 241 Posts
    • 282 Thanks
    unrecordings
    • #5
    • 14th Feb 18, 3:55 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Feb 18, 3:55 PM
    Great thread - this never really occurred to me. Weather permitting I'll be out tomorrow taking cuttings, putting them in compo and into the greenhouse
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 14th Feb 18, 9:42 PM
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    Davesnave
    • #6
    • 14th Feb 18, 9:42 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Feb 18, 9:42 PM
    . Weather permitting I'll be out tomorrow taking cuttings, putting them in compo and into the greenhouse
    Originally posted by unrecordings
    You'll probably do just as well sticking them in a semi-shaded bit of outdoor ground with added drainage material.

    The problem with greenhouses & tunnels is that conditions inside fluctuate wildly at this time of year.

    I have a corner of my tunnel where I strike cuttings, but a lot of plants seem to do just as well outside.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • unrecordings
    • By unrecordings 16th Feb 18, 10:07 AM
    • 241 Posts
    • 282 Thanks
    unrecordings
    • #7
    • 16th Feb 18, 10:07 AM
    • #7
    • 16th Feb 18, 10:07 AM
    Noted - thanks

    It's just for a week or so while I tidy up. I've got a 'tree' at the bottom of the garden so I got about a dozen nice cuttings say 18-24" which wanted to blow all over the place yesterday
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