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  • FIRST POST
    • kezzygirl
    • By kezzygirl 14th Feb 18, 9:31 AM
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    kezzygirl
    Anxious dog constant whining
    • #1
    • 14th Feb 18, 9:31 AM
    Anxious dog constant whining 14th Feb 18 at 9:31 AM
    We have had our retriever since a pup, she will be 8 in Nov. Since we moved to our house almost 6 years ago, she has slept outside of our bedroom door and had the "run" of downstairs. Our bedroom is downstairs, we have 2 other bedrooms upstairs.

    We have had an offer accepted and are in the process of buying a house with 3 beds upstairs. This was 2 months ago and since then we have enclosed her in the kitchen with a stair gate at night only. She has continued to whimper loudly at night making a high pitched whistling noise and waking me twice a Night, every night with this noise. I have made sure she has plenty of food and water, has her toys, have left the radio on low as company, made sure her bed is clean and comfy.

    I am at the end of my tether, does anyone hAve any other suggestions as to what we can Do? I am planning on buying a stop bark collar? Do they work?
Page 1
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 14th Feb 18, 12:39 PM
    • 2,337 Posts
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    Red-Squirrel
    • #2
    • 14th Feb 18, 12:39 PM
    • #2
    • 14th Feb 18, 12:39 PM
    I don't understand, why are you confining her?

    Definitely don't buy an anti-bark collar, they are really cruel and will only make her more distressed.
    • SensibleSarah
    • By SensibleSarah 14th Feb 18, 12:55 PM
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    SensibleSarah
    • #3
    • 14th Feb 18, 12:55 PM
    • #3
    • 14th Feb 18, 12:55 PM
    It'll probably be the change in routine - some dogs find it very distressing (my dog included).
    Not sure why you're confining her to this area currently but if she can go back to how things used to be for now, when you actually move house can be a good time to form a new routine if you want her to sleep somewhere else specific. She'll have to form new associations with the whole new house so this part shouldn't be as much of an issue. I take it you don't want her upstairs at all in the new house?

    Another definite no to the anti-bark collar. All they do is frighten the dog into staying quiet - the source of their stress is still there and unresolved - so it can be very damaging to them.
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 14th Feb 18, 2:04 PM
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    sheramber
    • #4
    • 14th Feb 18, 2:04 PM
    • #4
    • 14th Feb 18, 2:04 PM
    As your dog is anxious you need to work on that. A stop bark collar will just make her more anxious.

    Would you punish a child who was crying because they were anxious?

    First step is go back to the beginning and let her sleep in her usual place.

    Once she is settled move her bed a short distance away. After a few days move it agin a little further away and so on.

    Only move it when she is settled at the new distance.

    However, any adjustment you make now will be irrelevant when you move house as she will be a different place.

    So I would forget about moving her and wait and see what is appropriate when you move.

    Is there ny reason why she could not continue to sleep out side your bedroom when you move?

    If the stairs are the problem then she will probably find her own solution to where she sleeps.
    • kezzygirl
    • By kezzygirl 14th Feb 18, 3:23 PM
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    kezzygirl
    • #5
    • 14th Feb 18, 3:23 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Feb 18, 3:23 PM
    As your dog is anxious you need to work on that. A stop bark collar will just make her more anxious.

    Would you punish a child who was crying because they were anxious?

    First step is go back to the beginning and let her sleep in her usual place.

    Once she is settled move her bed a short distance away. After a few days move it agin a little further away and so on.
    she doesn't sleep on her bed, she lays outside our bedroom door and will then lay in hall way at the bottom of the stairs.
    Only move it when she is settled at the new distance.

    However, any adjustment you make now will be irrelevant when you move house as she will be a different place.

    So I would forget about moving her and wait and see what is appropriate when you move.

    Is there ny reason why she could not continue to sleep out side your bedroom when you move?
    I don't want her upstairs in the new house, or in the living room until evenings.
    If the stairs are the problem then she will probably find her own solution to where she sleeps.
    Originally posted by sheramber
    Thanks for everyone's responses. I am keeping her in the kitchen at night so when we come to move she will have that space to herself to sleep etc and will be used to not sleeping outside of our room.
    I do not want her to be coming upstairs to our room to sleep outside as a matter of preference. I see what is meant by waiting until we move, that is probably a better idea as the upstairs will not have already been established as her territory so to speak.thanks again for the suggestions.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 14th Feb 18, 3:37 PM
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    Red-Squirrel
    • #6
    • 14th Feb 18, 3:37 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Feb 18, 3:37 PM
    I don't want her upstairs in the new house, or in the living room until evenings.
    Originally posted by kezzygirl
    How many hours a day is she going to be shut in the kitchen?
    • kezzygirl
    • By kezzygirl 14th Feb 18, 4:11 PM
    • 641 Posts
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    kezzygirl
    • #7
    • 14th Feb 18, 4:11 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Feb 18, 4:11 PM
    How many hours a day is she going to be shut in the kitchen?
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    My husband works nights 3 nights per week, the rest of the time he is home. We have a stair gate at the door so she will not be shut in the kitchen as in a door closed, she will have free run of the 27ft kitchen throughout the day. In practice it may not be possible. Just don't want new living room carpet full of fur when she could be kept in one area to limit this and help carpet last longer
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 14th Feb 18, 4:42 PM
    • 2,337 Posts
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    Red-Squirrel
    • #8
    • 14th Feb 18, 4:42 PM
    • #8
    • 14th Feb 18, 4:42 PM
    My husband works nights 3 nights per week, the rest of the time he is home. We have a stair gate at the door so she will not be shut in the kitchen as in a door closed, she will have free run of the 27ft kitchen throughout the day. In practice it may not be possible. Just don't want new living room carpet full of fur when she could be kept in one area to limit this and help carpet last longer
    Originally posted by kezzygirl
    Just get laminate or a better hoover! Your dog has been part of your family for 8 years and won't understand why she is not allowed to be with you now.
    • WibblyGirly
    • By WibblyGirly 14th Feb 18, 5:50 PM
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    WibblyGirly
    • #9
    • 14th Feb 18, 5:50 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Feb 18, 5:50 PM
    And here I am allowing my cat to spoon me under the duvet on a night

    I'd just start with a new routine in the new house. I don't know dogs that well but I think most animals accept new rules in new places as they don't know any different.
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 14th Feb 18, 6:02 PM
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    sheramber
    Why have a dog if you are going to keep her in the kitchen? Dogs are pack animals and need companionship.

    I furnish my house to accommodate having a dog not the other way round.
    • elsien
    • By elsien 14th Feb 18, 7:36 PM
    • 15,855 Posts
    • 40,027 Thanks
    elsien
    If she's used to being with you, it's going to take a lot of work to help her stay in the kitchen during the day and at night. She will probably become a lot more anxious unless you put the time/effort in. You can't just move to a new house with a new routine and expect her to understand and accept it straight away. Personally, I'm one of the sod the carpet brigade.
    Please don't use an anti bark collar on a stressed dog, that's just cruel.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • Jaymie kate
    • By Jaymie kate 20th Feb 18, 2:30 PM
    • 32 Posts
    • 53 Thanks
    Jaymie kate
    Dogs are not used to be confined. We have 2 dogs, 5 y/o and 24 weeks old labs and we've always made sure they burn their energy so they don't develop aggression.
    • Timpu
    • By Timpu 20th Feb 18, 3:33 PM
    • 254 Posts
    • 305 Thanks
    Timpu
    One point causing confusion OP. You say you'd like the dog to come into the living room in the evenings...to help preserve the carpets. I don't get how this will work? Is this to do with shedding? The Goldies I know cover rooms in fur quickly enough with a single shake. You'll still have to vacuum, right?
    Or are you worried the dog will soil/chew/damage the carpet in some way?

    I have to agree with others, stuff the carpets when you've got a loyal canine friend who's been with you since puppyhood.

    By coincidence, I saw this today on shock collars from The Dogs Trust. I'm assuming these are the same as stop bark collars having read responses to OP's question.
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