Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • mbzon
    • By mbzon 12th Feb 18, 7:45 PM
    • 23Posts
    • 0Thanks
    mbzon
    Retiring to the EU after Brexit?
    • #1
    • 12th Feb 18, 7:45 PM
    Retiring to the EU after Brexit? 12th Feb 18 at 7:45 PM
    This is on behalf of my mother, who after years of chasing the moving goal posts will finally retire this year with a long awaited plan of retiring to a warmer EU country (Spain, Portugal or Greece are some of the favourites).

    The thing is, while I know a lot is unknown she now has no idea what to expect or if the plan might even be possible after/just before Brexit.

    I know the visa situation is difficult to know at this time, but her main concern is rather health care; as she has just recovered from cancer a few years ago and is also currently having weekly (expensive) injections for arthritis private healthcare would be impossibly expensive. So what would her options be, if any?

    She is considering to move earlier than planned (around summer of this year), or considering to keep her residence and only live part of the year in the new country, but how would she receive her weekly treatments in this case?

    I know a lot of these things are still unknown, but vague opinions are very welcome. Is there a way that she will likely be able to keep to her plan, or does she have to give up on her retirement dreams and stay in the UK?
Page 1
    • ermine
    • By ermine 12th Feb 18, 7:57 PM
    • 644 Posts
    • 949 Thanks
    ermine
    • #2
    • 12th Feb 18, 7:57 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Feb 18, 7:57 PM
    private healthcare would be impossibly expensive. So what would her options be, if any?[...]

    I know a lot of these things are still unknown, but vague opinions are very welcome. Is there a way that she will likely be able to keep to her plan, or does she have to give up on her retirement dreams and stay in the UK?
    Originally posted by mbzon
    I'd say she's SOL and it ain't happening from some of what you've said. Let's face it, very few of us get any healthier with age. But you haven't said what her resources are, if she has half a mill squirreled away if might be different. Does she own her property outright? How old is she, what connection does she have with her desired destination etc etc.
    • msallen
    • By msallen 12th Feb 18, 8:13 PM
    • 698 Posts
    • 693 Thanks
    msallen
    • #3
    • 12th Feb 18, 8:13 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Feb 18, 8:13 PM
    vague opinions are very welcome
    Originally posted by mbzon
    She might be able to do it.
    • Voyager2002
    • By Voyager2002 12th Feb 18, 8:23 PM
    • 11,924 Posts
    • 8,076 Thanks
    Voyager2002
    • #4
    • 12th Feb 18, 8:23 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Feb 18, 8:23 PM
    At the moment, the bill for health care for British pensioners living in other EU countries is still paid by the British government. I would imagine that this arrangement will end rapidly following Brexit. So anyone in such a position would need to establish entitlement under whatever system is in place in the country where they live (and different EU countries have different systems). The best advice for your mother, then, is to find a country that has a decent public health-care system and where she could make herself eligible for care under that system in the year or so remaining. I suggest that she (or you) should have a good look at Expat forums for the relevant countries.
    • mbzon
    • By mbzon 12th Feb 18, 8:53 PM
    • 23 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    mbzon
    • #5
    • 12th Feb 18, 8:53 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Feb 18, 8:53 PM
    Yes I am also looking into the specific countries and what her situation would be there, but I was thinking more about using the NHS healthcare in these countries somehow. Maybe by keeping her British residence for example?

    I've also heard the NHS is sometimes happy for people to get treaten abroad as it's often cheaper than it is in the UK.

    Finally... As I understand at the moment within the EU she would automatically be eligible for the same public health insurance as any local, but if she moved in 2018 what are the chances that would continue into the future?
    • Sobraon
    • By Sobraon 12th Feb 18, 9:00 PM
    • 285 Posts
    • 155 Thanks
    Sobraon
    • #6
    • 12th Feb 18, 9:00 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Feb 18, 9:00 PM
    Continuing access to healthcare was the subject of fairly early discussion (see this Guardian report last August).

    The PM reiterated the intention in a letter to expats in December 2017.

    But the 'devil will be in the detail' and of course the UK may leave without a deal.
    • mbzon
    • By mbzon 12th Feb 18, 11:53 PM
    • 23 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    mbzon
    • #7
    • 12th Feb 18, 11:53 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Feb 18, 11:53 PM
    Continuing access to healthcare was the subject of fairly early discussion (see this Guardian report last August).

    The PM reiterated the intention in a letter to expats in December 2017.

    But the 'devil will be in the detail' and of course the UK may leave without a deal.
    Originally posted by Sobraon
    Thanks, that is good to hear. But it seems to be refering to people who are already living in the EU, do you think that would still apply to a person who moved in 2018 or even later?
    • crv1963
    • By crv1963 13th Feb 18, 7:34 AM
    • 230 Posts
    • 562 Thanks
    crv1963
    • #8
    • 13th Feb 18, 7:34 AM
    • #8
    • 13th Feb 18, 7:34 AM
    We can't really second guess but I would expect there will be some sort of deal where those already resident in a country retain the rights that they already enjoy whilst those arriving after a designated date do not have those rights conferred on them.


    This has already been suggested as the UK point of view- those here keep what they have those arriving after Brexit don't get the same rights so why would the EU give UK citizens more rights than we give EU citizens?


    I'd suggest move before Brexit actually happens!
    CRV1963- Light bulb moment Sept 15- Planning the great escape- aka retirement!
    • Alexland
    • By Alexland 13th Feb 18, 8:03 AM
    • 1,595 Posts
    • 1,099 Thanks
    Alexland
    • #9
    • 13th Feb 18, 8:03 AM
    • #9
    • 13th Feb 18, 8:03 AM
    Would she consider moving down to the south coast harbour towns in Devon where it can be quite warm?
    • justme111
    • By justme111 13th Feb 18, 9:05 AM
    • 2,924 Posts
    • 2,820 Thanks
    justme111
    the most straightforward way would be finding out how much those injections would cost - why you are assuming it wil be too expensive?
    Why does not she go to the country for a few months first and get a feel for it?Devon joke made me chuckle
    • margaretclare
    • By margaretclare 13th Feb 18, 9:17 AM
    • 10,089 Posts
    • 17,080 Thanks
    margaretclare
    Which languages does she speak? Spanish, Portuguese or Greek?
    r ic wisdom funde, r wear ic eald.
    Before I found wisdom, I became old.
    • steampowered
    • By steampowered 13th Feb 18, 10:48 AM
    • 2,178 Posts
    • 2,055 Thanks
    steampowered
    There are two roadblocks:

    * Healthcare. This will require a reciprocal deal to be reached under which the UK agrees to provide healthcare to EU nationals and vice-versa.

    * Immigration controls. Unless a deal requiring free movement of people (i.e. no immigration controls) within the EU is reached, Spain/Portugal/Greece may not be willing to grant her a long term visa. For non-EU migration most long-term visas required a job.

    There is no certainty on where either of these things will end up, so we are crystal ball gazing at the moment.
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 13th Feb 18, 10:58 AM
    • 2,277 Posts
    • 3,051 Thanks
    Silvertabby
    Even if a deal is reached, the reciprocal medical treatment arrangement on production of the E111 card (or whatever it's called now) is limited to medical treatment that is 'free' for the locals. Depending on which country we are talking about, this may be much less comprehensive than the NHS.

    ADD:

    Unlike the NHS, which provides 'free' translators at the drop of a hat, your mum would have to provide her own translator for every appointment. Unless she speaks the lingo, of course.......
    Last edited by Silvertabby; 13-02-2018 at 11:22 AM.
    • seacaitch
    • By seacaitch 13th Feb 18, 11:05 AM
    • 74 Posts
    • 137 Thanks
    seacaitch
    This is on behalf of my mother, who after years of chasing the moving goal posts will finally retire this year with a long awaited plan of retiring to a warmer EU country
    Originally posted by mbzon

    It seems clear there is no plan, only an aspiration, albeit one probably shared by many.

    To form a plan you/she have a great deal of research to do, complicated hugely by Brexit's additional unknowables.

    I suspect she's probably going nowhere.
    • Andy L
    • By Andy L 13th Feb 18, 11:54 AM
    • 8,763 Posts
    • 7,156 Thanks
    Andy L
    Yes I am also looking into the specific countries and what her situation would be there, but I was thinking more about using the NHS healthcare in these countries somehow. Maybe by keeping her British residence for example?
    Originally posted by mbzon
    by moving overseas she would automatically (after 2 years IIRC) break residency. To keep it she would have to spend part of the year living in the UK which would probably defeat the advantages of living overseas
    • NineDeuce
    • By NineDeuce 13th Feb 18, 12:51 PM
    • 763 Posts
    • 659 Thanks
    NineDeuce
    The best vague opinion is maybe, maybe not. It all depends on whether the government need to win over anti-immigration voters. It's quite easy to provoke false feelings so it will all depend on this.
    • Sobraon
    • By Sobraon 13th Feb 18, 1:02 PM
    • 285 Posts
    • 155 Thanks
    Sobraon
    1.3 million people born in the UK live in other EU countries.

    In 2016 the DWP paid out 490,869 British pensions a year to people in the EU (although these include, for example, Irish people who have returned to Ireland after working in the UK).

    If the current retirement health arrangements are significantly changed then that would be a "A Very Courageous Decision" on behalf of the PM!
    • Cyclizine
    • By Cyclizine 13th Feb 18, 1:18 PM
    • 43 Posts
    • 42 Thanks
    Cyclizine
    NHS care is residency based, if you're permanent home is one of the home nations, you're entitled. If you live abroad permanently, you can't just pop back to the UK to get some free health care on the Nash. Many people do it, but it's really an abuse of the system - and before all of the "I've paid my stamp" folk start arguing, lobby the government for contribution based care if you're that bothered by it. The majority of the "foreigner" spending is for returning ex-pats, who are the real health tourists
    • fewgroats
    • By fewgroats 13th Feb 18, 1:21 PM
    • 466 Posts
    • 250 Thanks
    fewgroats
    Would she consider moving down to the south coast harbour towns in Devon where it can be quite warm?
    Originally posted by Alexland
    Why would someone who saved up to move abroad over several years suddenly change their mind for no good reason?
    ASK & ANSWER CHALLENGE. ASKS:3. ANSWER: 2.
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 13th Feb 18, 1:46 PM
    • 7,768 Posts
    • 8,463 Thanks
    Owain Moneysaver
    Why would someone who saved up to move abroad over several years suddenly change their mind for no good reason?
    Originally posted by fewgroats
    Because the implications of Britain leaving the EU may be a very good reason.

    Healthcare in Greece is already one of the worst in the EU and given Greece's ongoing financial difficulties unlikely to get any better.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jan/01/patients-dying-greece-public-health-meltdown
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

4,366Posts Today

9,603Users online

Martin's Twitter