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  • FIRST POST
    • coffeeandbiscuits
    • By coffeeandbiscuits 10th Feb 18, 5:50 PM
    • 1Posts
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    coffeeandbiscuits
    Homebuyers survey worrying - should I proceed?
    • #1
    • 10th Feb 18, 5:50 PM
    Homebuyers survey worrying - should I proceed? 10th Feb 18 at 5:50 PM
    I'm a FTB buying a 1930s semi-detached home in the North of England for 150k on my own. It was up for guide price 150-160, and had 2 people pull out prior. I've had a survey done which has found that;

    There is lead supply piping between the house and water main. The survey says that a section of pipe underneath the sink is of older leadwork and that they believed that older lead piping could be elsewhere in the house.

    The electrics haven't been checked since 2008 - the survey says that some fittings are of an older style and that there was no safety certificate. Would electrics likely go too wrong in 10 years?

    There were high readings of damp to accessible ground floor walls, especially to the wall between the living room and kitchen, and he thought most likely the rear wall of the house. There's apparently evidence of damp proofing courses, so I've asked my solicitor for copies, but haven't received anything yet.

    The roof needs a bit of retiling and backpointing, but a family member is a roofer and he's said that's not a massive job, but I need insulation, and will need to reroof in the future, as it's the original roof.

    Valuation came back at 147.5k from homebuyers.

    Other bits need doing (lots of decorating, new kitchen in future, gas and boiler checks, new alarm) but I'd anticipated these more.

    I'm also a bit worried as it seems the electricity board has run wires up to my land, but it's not within it, and the lease for this runs out next year, so I probably thought it wasn't too much a concern?

    I do really like the house, it's a nice location, has some lovely schools in the area, and has room to extend in the future, and is basically the best I can afford BUT I'm worried that with all of the issues above I might be paying over what I should? Does anybody have any advise as it would be much appreciated!
Page 1
    • JoJo1978
    • By JoJo1978 10th Feb 18, 6:01 PM
    • 319 Posts
    • 387 Thanks
    JoJo1978
    • #2
    • 10th Feb 18, 6:01 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Feb 18, 6:01 PM
    Firstly, can you afford the 2.5k shortfall between the valuation and what you offered?

    Electric safety test isn't that expensive, but not comprehensive either. Surveyors aren't electricians so all surveys say this.

    Find out what kind of damp: rising, penetrating or condensate. The latter is really easy to sort. Don't get a second damp survey done by any business that sells damp solutions.

    Was there a recommendation on the lead pipework to replace it? If so find out a rough cost for doing so.

    Try to find out why the previous buyers pulled out. If it too was survey related then you're in a strong position to negotiate the price down, by costing up all the work that needs doing and knocking that off.

    Do you really want all this work though, as a FTB?
    Hamster in the wheel (London) 1999-2017
    Mortgage free since 2015; Pension pot sorted 2017
    Second career (what TBD!) 2018
    • ashe
    • By ashe 10th Feb 18, 6:16 PM
    • 324 Posts
    • 194 Thanks
    ashe
    • #3
    • 10th Feb 18, 6:16 PM
    • #3
    • 10th Feb 18, 6:16 PM
    You have to expect issues with these houses as theyre nearly 100 years old. Surveys will throw up all kinds of scary things but most can be sorted. It sup to you if you think these things warrant more investigation (££), urgent work (£££ but can potentially negotiate off the price) or walk away (-£)

    As a FTB i would say the latter option because it sounds like potential issues, but if you are insistent on the property, as two have walked away and others may also, you can try negotiate with the vendor, who may of course say no, in which case you can look elsewhere.
    • societys child
    • By societys child 10th Feb 18, 7:48 PM
    • 5,053 Posts
    • 5,563 Thanks
    societys child
    • #4
    • 10th Feb 18, 7:48 PM
    • #4
    • 10th Feb 18, 7:48 PM
    I've never owned a house that didn't have a lead piping mains supply.

    To be honest, I don't see any real issues.

    • G_M
    • By G_M 10th Feb 18, 8:16 PM
    • 43,214 Posts
    • 50,792 Thanks
    G_M
    • #5
    • 10th Feb 18, 8:16 PM
    • #5
    • 10th Feb 18, 8:16 PM
    I'm a FTB buying a 1930s semi-detached home in the North of England for 150k ....

    There is lead supply piping between the house and water main.
    Unsurprising in an old property. Thousands (millions?) of properties have lead piping (mine does). If this worries you, either
    * budget to replace it (it's not reasonable to expect the seller to pay - it's your choice), or
    * find a modern house

    The electrics haven't been checked since 2008
    2008 style electrcs should be fine - it's old 1950s rubber-coated wiing, and old-style fuse bxes with fuse wire that are really dodgy.

    - the survey says that some fittings are of an older style and that there was no safety certificate. Would electrics likely go too wrong in 10 years?
    If you are concerned, pay an electrician for a report, but do not expect electrics to current (ie 2018) Buiding Regs standards.

    There were high readings of damp to accessible ground floor walls, especially to the wall between the living room and kitchen, and he thought most likely the rear wall of the house. There's apparently evidence of damp proofing courses, so I've asked my solicitor for copies, but haven't received anything yet.
    very few houses have dpc certificates so your solicitor is unlikely to help here.
    What is causing the damp - that's he question.
    * condensation? Easy to resolve with heating, ventilation, and life-style changes (eg dry clothes outdoors or in a dryer)
    * penetrating damp? eg leaking down pipe, external ground level too high? Mostly easy to resolve once identified
    * rising damp eg missing /failed dpc. Very rare.

    The roof needs a bit of retiling and backpointing, but a family member is a roofer and he's said that's not a massive job,
    so your relative fixes it one weekend
    but I need insulation,
    £20 and a day's DIY

    and will need to reroof in the future, as it's the original roof.
    'in the future' All roofs will need reroofing 'in the future. If it's bascally sound apart from a few tiles, then ignore until 'the future'.

    Valuation came back at 147.5k from homebuyers.
    You may need to find some xtra cash if your mortgage is reduced.

    Other bits need doing (lots of decorating, new kitchen in future, gas and boiler checks, new alarm) but I'd anticipated these more.
    You're buying a house. That is always th cae (except perhaps a New Build).

    I'm also a bit worried as it seems the electricity board has run wires up to my land, but it's not within it, and the lease for this runs out next year, so I probably thought it wasn't too much a concern?
    Don't understand. Lease for what.where?
    Electricity board runs wires up to everyone's land!

    .... I'm worried that with all of the issues above I might be paying over what I should?..!
    Originally posted by coffeeandbiscuits
    uy the house, fix it up. Enjoy your home.
    • antrobus
    • By antrobus 10th Feb 18, 8:26 PM
    • 15,473 Posts
    • 22,079 Thanks
    antrobus
    • #6
    • 10th Feb 18, 8:26 PM
    • #6
    • 10th Feb 18, 8:26 PM
    ...There is lead supply piping between the house and water main. The survey says that a section of pipe underneath the sink is of older leadwork and that they believed that older lead piping could be elsewhere in the house.
    Originally posted by coffeeandbiscuits
    I still have a is lead supply piping between the house and water main.

    ...The electrics haven't been checked since 2008 - the survey says that some fittings are of an older style and that there was no safety certificate. Would electrics likely go too wrong in 10 years?
    Originally posted by coffeeandbiscuits
    Get an electician

    ..There were high readings of damp to accessible ground floor walls, especially to the wall between the living room and kitchen, and he thought most likely the rear wall of the house. There's apparently evidence of damp proofing courses, so I've asked my solicitor for copies, but haven't received anything yet.
    Originally posted by coffeeandbiscuits
    First of all, understand this, rising damp does not exist.
    https://www.heritage-house.org/damp-and-condensation/the-fraud-of-rising-damp.html

    Second, if there are "high readings of damp to accessible ground floor walls, especially to the wall between the living room and kitchen" it's unlikely to be water penetrating from the exterior otherwise it would be upstairs as well. Condensation, it is a flippin kitchen.

    Thirdly, you can stick a damp meter in almost any wall you like and get a reading. Signifies nothing. Black mould, peeling wallpaper, are the things you worry about.


    ....I'm also a bit worried as it seems the electricity board has run wires up to my land, but it's not within it, and the lease for this runs out next year, so I probably thought it wasn't too much a concern?
    Originally posted by coffeeandbiscuits
    That's what solicitors are for.
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