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  • FIRST POST
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 7th Feb 18, 9:36 AM
    • 24,851Posts
    • 52,683Thanks
    VfM4meplse
    Fibreglass insulation
    • #1
    • 7th Feb 18, 9:36 AM
    Fibreglass insulation 7th Feb 18 at 9:36 AM
    I've long thought that loose fibreglass (the pink and tufty stuff) is unsafe to the degree that a mask is required, but can appreciate that much like asbestos if its contained within a sealed product and not disturbed it passes muster. Am I right?

    If so, why is the pink stuff still sold?
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
Page 1
    • Furts
    • By Furts 7th Feb 18, 9:48 AM
    • 3,861 Posts
    • 2,459 Thanks
    Furts
    • #2
    • 7th Feb 18, 9:48 AM
    • #2
    • 7th Feb 18, 9:48 AM
    On building sites 30 years ago is was recognised as a concern. There were thoughts about long term exposure and cancer. We had warnings. But there is not really that exposure, and I do not think anything is proven. The issue is these are strands of glass that form an irritant and cut. Hence the mask, gloves and overalls when laying the stuff. Once laid it is left undisturbed. No way would anyone want a usable attic space with such stuff exposed.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 7th Feb 18, 10:56 AM
    • 13,556 Posts
    • 17,786 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    • #3
    • 7th Feb 18, 10:56 AM
    • #3
    • 7th Feb 18, 10:56 AM
    I've long thought that loose fibreglass (the pink and tufty stuff) is unsafe to the degree that a mask is required, but can appreciate that much like asbestos if its contained within a sealed product and not disturbed it passes muster. Am I right?

    If so, why is the pink stuff still sold?
    Originally posted by VfM4meplse
    Because the risk is negligible.

    "no one has found any of cancer attributable to the manufacture or installation of glass wool fibers in spite of diligent searches"

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10536105
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.” - Mark Twain
    • tonyh66
    • By tonyh66 7th Feb 18, 12:42 PM
    • 1,102 Posts
    • 770 Thanks
    tonyh66
    • #4
    • 7th Feb 18, 12:42 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Feb 18, 12:42 PM
    Because the risk is negligible.
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    What about silicosis, has anyone looked into fibres causing this?
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 7th Feb 18, 5:35 PM
    • 13,556 Posts
    • 17,786 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    • #5
    • 7th Feb 18, 5:35 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Feb 18, 5:35 PM
    What about silicosis, has anyone looked into fibres causing this?
    Originally posted by tonyh66
    Silocosis is caused by inhalation of crystalline silica dust. Glass is not crystalline.

    That said, I can't imagine inhaling it for any length of time would do you a lot of good.
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.” - Mark Twain
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 8th Feb 18, 9:37 AM
    • 24,851 Posts
    • 52,683 Thanks
    VfM4meplse
    • #6
    • 8th Feb 18, 9:37 AM
    • #6
    • 8th Feb 18, 9:37 AM
    Because the risk is negligible.
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    All this means is that no correlation has been found yet. We are reliant on observational evidence in the absence of a prospective RCT (which wouldn!!!8217;t gain ethical approval anyway). Common sense suggests exposure should be avoided where possible.

    So my next question is: is there any requirement for a rental property with the pink tufty stuff as loft insulation (not marketed as a living space) to have this contained in some way?
    Last edited by VfM4meplse; 08-02-2018 at 9:40 AM.
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 8th Feb 18, 9:40 AM
    • 6,646 Posts
    • 5,402 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    • #7
    • 8th Feb 18, 9:40 AM
    • #7
    • 8th Feb 18, 9:40 AM
    Asbestos causes asbestosis unlike loft insulation which is an irritant but doesn't cause a disease.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

    Never trust a newbie with a rtb tale.
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