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  • FIRST POST
    • BananaRepublic
    • By BananaRepublic 7th Feb 18, 7:44 AM
    • 1,173Posts
    • 851Thanks
    BananaRepublic
    Fence posts
    • #1
    • 7th Feb 18, 7:44 AM
    Fence posts 7th Feb 18 at 7:44 AM
    A large section of the wooden ~2 metre tall fence at the bottom of my garden came down in recent storms, mainly because the posts were held by metal stakes which are unsuitable in heavy clay soil when waterlogged. Anyway, the neighbour wants to share the repair cost, but prefers concrete posts, in part because there is a 6" drop at the boundary, and concrete boards will hold the soil back better than wood which bows. I find concrete ugly. He says that concrete will last longer. My view is that wood looks better and if held with postcrete/concrete at the base, it will not blow over so easily.

    Are there alternatives, such as a concrete base that can support a wooden post above the soil line? Does painted concrete look okay? I paint the fence with a dark oak preservative, which could cover the posts too.
Page 1
    • marlot
    • By marlot 7th Feb 18, 7:50 AM
    • 3,268 Posts
    • 2,378 Thanks
    marlot
    • #2
    • 7th Feb 18, 7:50 AM
    • #2
    • 7th Feb 18, 7:50 AM
    I'm with your neighbour in preferring concrete posts.

    I guess you could put some wooden cladding over them on your side?
    • Furts
    • By Furts 7th Feb 18, 8:38 AM
    • 3,861 Posts
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    Furts
    • #3
    • 7th Feb 18, 8:38 AM
    • #3
    • 7th Feb 18, 8:38 AM
    There are fences and posts on the gardens around where I live that have been in for 30 years and are still fine. Timber will last, the problem is consumers frequently seek the cheapest and this does not last. For example, the posts in my garden are 100x100 and pressure treated after being cut to length. Numerous consumers go to a diy shed and get 75x75 posts that have received a token dip of colour and these will not last.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 7th Feb 18, 8:45 AM
    • 14,852 Posts
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    • #4
    • 7th Feb 18, 8:45 AM
    • #4
    • 7th Feb 18, 8:45 AM
    Sounds like that's the thing then - ie 100 x 100 quality posts.

    Other alternative - maybe changing the fence to a wall (brick - rather than concrete blocks - as you don't like "ugly"). I sympathise - as I don't like "ugly" either.
    NOT dancing to anyone else's tune.

    It's the 21st century now....
    • Jonesya
    • By Jonesya 7th Feb 18, 8:53 AM
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    Jonesya
    • #5
    • 7th Feb 18, 8:53 AM
    • #5
    • 7th Feb 18, 8:53 AM
    I'm sure with a lick of paint they'd blend in, I think the main problem with concrete posts are that it makes fixing things like trellis and hooks for plant wires difficult.

    You can buy special clamp for the posts but a bit of a pain.
    • parcival
    • By parcival 7th Feb 18, 10:56 AM
    • 442 Posts
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    parcival
    • #6
    • 7th Feb 18, 10:56 AM
    • #6
    • 7th Feb 18, 10:56 AM
    Quality wooden fence posts - 4x4 inches well installed with Post/Concrete will last many many years. We had concrete posts once and painted them with milk. It made them look less concrety and more like wood........
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 7th Feb 18, 11:47 AM
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    Davesnave
    • #7
    • 7th Feb 18, 11:47 AM
    • #7
    • 7th Feb 18, 11:47 AM
    Even the 75x75 intermediate posts I installed in the late 1980s were still there when I last looked in 2013, but that's because I bought them from Jacksons.

    But concrete is better at holding back soil and it will take preservative or other paints, although if it were in my garden I'd probably not see much of it anyway, due to planting.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • elver man
    • By elver man 7th Feb 18, 1:05 PM
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    elver man
    • #8
    • 7th Feb 18, 1:05 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Feb 18, 1:05 PM
    Agree with Furts above, I buy all my timber from one of two local timber yards and the difference in quality between them and the local diy sheds is enormous.


    I have quoted for fencing only to be told that the customer prefers the product to come from a shed as they sell loads of the stuff so it must be good. I get cut to length and pressure treated post which will far outlast the stuff bought in sheds which has hardly any preservative penetrating the surface. Also its cheaper from a Timber supplier.


    If its a concrete or wooden post, providing its fixed properly in the ground both would be as secure


    However, I believe that concrete gravel boards will outlast any timber board, and given that the board in your instance is holding back soil, I would opt for concrete posts and concrete gravel board.


    I wouldn't do it but I have seen 100x100 wooden posts used with bolt on type concrete gravel boards, (type used for recessed concrete posts rather than slotted) It would give you the look of wood you like plus the extra strength and rot resistance of a concrete gravel board.
    Thoughts:

    The surest sign that there is intelligent life in the universe is that they haven't contacted us yet
    Life's most urgent question is: what are you doing for others?
    Life's most urgent question is: What are you doing for others - Martin Luther King jr
    • BananaRepublic
    • By BananaRepublic 7th Feb 18, 3:35 PM
    • 1,173 Posts
    • 851 Thanks
    BananaRepublic
    • #9
    • 7th Feb 18, 3:35 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Feb 18, 3:35 PM
    Thanks all. One problem is knowing which posts are higher quality. The descriptions all seem to be high pressure treated with 15 years warranty. The current posts are 4" by 4". One was rotten at the base after 7 years in the ground. The others were fine.

    An alternative is to have the post attached to a concrete base by means of a rod in the base. Thus the wood is not in contact with soil. But I can't find any for sale in the UK. I suppose brick bases with poles attached via a metal clamp is another idea, but brick bases would cost I guess.

    I really do find concrete ugly, however it is an option.
    • mchale
    • By mchale 7th Feb 18, 6:48 PM
    • 1,683 Posts
    • 936 Thanks
    mchale
    1 option is to make bath out of visqueen sheet and fill with a wood preservative and then soak each fence post overnight, a bit long winded but will stop them rotting.
    ANURADHA KOIRALA ??? go on throw it in google.
    • rach_k
    • By rach_k 7th Feb 18, 7:20 PM
    • 1,121 Posts
    • 1,893 Thanks
    rach_k
    I'd just go for painting or staining the concrete. A quick Google will bring up other people asking about it and those who have done it, as well as a few examples. I read that you should bear in mind that the wood will change colour over time so choose the paint/stain carefully as it probably won't fade as much.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 8th Feb 18, 10:30 AM
    • 31,366 Posts
    • 18,795 Thanks
    getmore4less
    A large section of the wooden ~2 metre tall fence at the bottom of my garden came down in recent storms, mainly because the posts were held by metal stakes which are unsuitable in heavy clay soil when waterlogged. Anyway, the neighbour wants to share the repair cost, but prefers concrete posts, in part because there is a 6" drop at the boundary, and concrete boards will hold the soil back better than wood which bows. I find concrete ugly. He says that concrete will last longer. My view is that wood looks better and if held with postcrete/concrete at the base, it will not blow over so easily.

    Are there alternatives, such as a concrete base that can support a wooden post above the soil line? Does painted concrete look okay? I paint the fence with a dark oak preservative, which could cover the posts too.
    Originally posted by BananaRepublic

    There are versions of the spiked holders that you concrete in.
    eg: Metpost Concrete In System 2 100mm x 100mm


    if you went for a proper fence with arris rails would the neighbour be happy for you to have the nice side?

    You need the posts with notches/recessed as these allow the boards to be continuous, not the slotted ones which don't.

    eg.
    • Furts
    • By Furts 8th Feb 18, 10:41 AM
    • 3,861 Posts
    • 2,456 Thanks
    Furts
    Thanks all. One problem is knowing which posts are higher quality. The descriptions all seem to be high pressure treated with 15 years warranty. The current posts are 4" by 4". One was rotten at the base after 7 years in the ground. The others were fine.

    An alternative is to have the post attached to a concrete base by means of a rod in the base. Thus the wood is not in contact with soil. But I can't find any for sale in the UK. I suppose brick bases with poles attached via a metal clamp is another idea, but brick bases would cost I guess.

    I really do find concrete ugly, however it is an option.
    Originally posted by BananaRepublic
    There is a flaw with pressure treated which you are not picking up on. This is exploited by diy sheds preying on consumers who do not know. Pressure treated fence posts are useless if the timber is pressure treated before it arrives for cutting into posts. It must be pressure treated after being cut to length. But then one has no idea how carefully the pressure treating has been done, and your failed post may have a shake or a knot causing the ingress of rot. Which means the consumer has to inspect the posts and it is always wise to soak the ends in preservative.
    • jhe
    • By jhe 8th Feb 18, 11:07 AM
    • 1,794 Posts
    • 695 Thanks
    jhe
    I have concrete posts and gravel boards all the way around my 100ft long garden all 2 metres high, I chose the posts that allow a fence to slot in for easier changing when needed.
    looks tidy enough to me.
    My garden is also clay and water does stand in it.
    the clay dries out in warmer weather and there is slight movement on the posts . that disappears when it rains again
    Last edited by jhe; 08-02-2018 at 11:10 AM.
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