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  • FIRST POST
    • treeny_bash
    • By treeny_bash 6th Feb 18, 4:02 PM
    • 154Posts
    • 1,025Thanks
    treeny_bash
    Getting started with a beauty routine
    • #1
    • 6th Feb 18, 4:02 PM
    Getting started with a beauty routine 6th Feb 18 at 4:02 PM
    Hi everyone


    I'm looking for some advice, and sorry in advance that it's a bit of an essay.


    I've been working from home for the last 8 months and my daily routine has somewhat slipped, to say the least. I'm ashamed to say that some days I don't even clean my teeth, let alone do any kind of skin care or anything else.


    I started a few years ago looking at self care and thinking more about making the effort with clothes, make up, jewellery, etc, but it has all slipped. Over time I've realised that actually I don't care as much about wearing makeup everyday, or if I spend every day wearing jeans and a jumper, but I do want to make sure that I'm looking after the basics. Also, I just got engaged, so I want to make sure that I'm in good shape for the wedding.


    So, my current regime is as follows (not often followed in entirety):
    Face - Superdrug Vit E hot cloth cleanser / Garnier Pure Clay Glow mask
    Face moisturiser - Olay complete day cream/olay complete night cream
    Teeth - Sensodyne Proenamel toothpaste
    Body scrub - Soap and Glory Scrub of your life
    Body moisturiser - not currently using (although I probably should)
    Hair - Aussie shampoo and conditioner, leave to air dry (although I just got a fringe cut in, so will be using my hairdryer/straighteners more)
    Feet - Soap and Glory heel genius (my cracked heels are really bad!)


    I got some BalanceMe Wonder Eyecream in my advent calendar which I tried today. It seemed to work quite well but I'm confused - am I supposed to avoid the area I put the eye cream on when I'm applying my normal face cream?


    I really want to get into a proper beauty routine, and make sure that even if I'm not wearing make up, or I'm just wearing jeans and a jumper, that I still have good skin, good teeth and good hair.


    So, sorry for the essay, but hit me with your suggestions. I don't want to start spending a fortune, but I want a self care routine that becomes second nature.


    Thanks in advance
Page 1
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 6th Feb 18, 10:06 PM
    • 2,336 Posts
    • 6,455 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    • #2
    • 6th Feb 18, 10:06 PM
    • #2
    • 6th Feb 18, 10:06 PM
    Go and see your dental hygienist to minimise the damage from not brushing regularly and to get a good start and some advice for your new regime of tooth/mouthcare.

    Don't spend a fortune on beauty products. Nothing cleans any better than soap and water, nothing moisturises much better than a basic emollient and you only need it anyway if you have dry skin!

    Most beauty products are pretty much a scam, best way to get good skin is to eat well, drink enough water and get enough sleep. Plus a dollop of luck and genetics.
    Last edited by Red-Squirrel; 07-02-2018 at 10:57 PM.
    • maddiemay
    • By maddiemay 7th Feb 18, 10:02 PM
    • 3,303 Posts
    • 30,332 Thanks
    maddiemay
    • #3
    • 7th Feb 18, 10:02 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Feb 18, 10:02 PM
    Be aware that aquaeous cream was intended as a wash off cleanser and not an moisturiser, it is often called "stingy cream" by children with skin conditions. There are many articles now advising against using it, as used for many years, as a moisturiser. This particular one is by Health Navigator NZ, but National Eczema Society publish similar statement.

    Why is aqueous cream no longer used as a leave-on emollient?
    Aqueous cream is no longer recommended as a leave-on emollient or moisturizer, because it contains an ingredient called sodium lauryl sulphate, which has been identified as a skin irritant, especially when in contact with the skin for prolonged, or extended periods. When left on the skin for prolonged periods, aqueous cream is associated with skin reactions, such as burning, stinging, itching and redness.(1) These reactions were observed when aqueous cream is used as a leave-on emollient but not when used as a wash product or soap substitute.


    The main role of SLS is as a lathering agent in washing/cleansing, when of course it is rinsed from the skin and not left on it.

    If you already use it and find it suits you fine, but potential new users beware.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 7th Feb 18, 10:56 PM
    • 2,336 Posts
    • 6,455 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    • #4
    • 7th Feb 18, 10:56 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Feb 18, 10:56 PM
    Be aware that aquaeous cream was intended as a wash off cleanser and not an moisturiser, it is often called "stingy cream" by children with skin conditions. There are many articles now advising against using it, as used for many years, as a moisturiser. This particular one is by Health Navigator NZ, but National Eczema Society publish similar statement.

    Why is aqueous cream no longer used as a leave-on emollient?
    Aqueous cream is no longer recommended as a leave-on emollient or moisturizer, because it contains an ingredient called sodium lauryl sulphate, which has been identified as a skin irritant, especially when in contact with the skin for prolonged, or extended periods. When left on the skin for prolonged periods, aqueous cream is associated with skin reactions, such as burning, stinging, itching and redness.(1) These reactions were observed when aqueous cream is used as a leave-on emollient but not when used as a wash product or soap substitute.


    The main role of SLS is as a lathering agent in washing/cleansing, when of course it is rinsed from the skin and not left on it.

    If you already use it and find it suits you fine, but potential new users beware.
    Originally posted by maddiemay
    Thanks, have edited my post, was not aware of that!
    • maddiemay
    • By maddiemay 8th Feb 18, 9:07 AM
    • 3,303 Posts
    • 30,332 Thanks
    maddiemay
    • #5
    • 8th Feb 18, 9:07 AM
    • #5
    • 8th Feb 18, 9:07 AM
    Thanks, have edited my post, was not aware of that!
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    Sadly not many people are, another quote, which really does concern me:-

    Almost 9 out of 10 doctors are wrongly prescribing aqueous cream to treat children with eczema, according to a poll published in the British Journal of Dermatology. Childhood eczema is best treated by applying an emollient moisturiser. Aqueous cream is an emollient but it is designed to be washed off the skin.


    Thank you for amending your post
    • evuka
    • By evuka 12th Feb 18, 3:56 PM
    • 104 Posts
    • 978 Thanks
    evuka
    • #6
    • 12th Feb 18, 3:56 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Feb 18, 3:56 PM
    Hi everyone


    So, my current regime is as follows (not often followed in entirety):


    Body moisturiser - not currently using (although I probably should)

    Feet - Soap and Glory heel genius (my cracked heels are really bad!)

    - am I supposed to avoid the area I put the eye cream on when I'm applying my normal face cream?


    Thanks in advance
    Originally posted by treeny_bash

    Hi, just found your thread and have some thoughts.

    Body moist - I use it regularly because my skin gets dried and itchy if I don't but if it hadn't been for that I would have not started it. If you feel your skin is OK without it, I'd say, no need to use it.

    Feet - Have you ever heard of Flylady? She is a home organizer woman and she recommends putting some lotion on your feet everyday after showering (whether it is morning or evening). It doesn't have to be anything special or expensive, the magic is in the daily routine! I used up age old footcream, noname handcream that I didn't like putting on my hands, etc but you can use almost anything Just do it before you put on your socks (or go to bed). Works wonders!

    Re the eye cream - I think you'd avoid the area, yes.


    I noticed that drinking enough water and eating properly helps with my skin. I'm prone to acne and if I have scars/scabs that don't want to heal, I drink water with some Vitamin C in it (got it from H&B, big jar of powder) and it helps.

    I agree that many things are just marketing and tricking us into buying things to "look better" and we don't realise that a person can be beautiful without make-up. Because we are used to it.

    With that said, I like make-up but recently I only use a BB cream and some lightly coloured lip balm. But even when I use more, it means eyeliner (and perhaps mascara) and the occasional lipstick. I love using different coloured pencils on my eyes (black, brown or green) because I wear glasses and I think it enhances my eyes and it gives me a boost if I don't feel pretty.

    If you can find one thing that means "being pretty" / fab to you, you can use it and immediately feel uplifted, even in jeans and jumpers! (and it does not necessary to be visible - you can colour your toenails or wear nice underwear)
    SwagBucks
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    • eringray
    • By eringray 13th Feb 18, 6:34 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    eringray
    • #7
    • 13th Feb 18, 6:34 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Feb 18, 6:34 PM
    In my opinion, your list looks great except you need to give your body some Vitamins and lots of water so that your skin will look fresh and clean.
    • jenniewb
    • By jenniewb 16th Feb 18, 2:38 AM
    • 12,333 Posts
    • 11,594 Thanks
    jenniewb
    • #8
    • 16th Feb 18, 2:38 AM
    • #8
    • 16th Feb 18, 2:38 AM
    Eye cream is a bit of a Marmite item among those in the beauty world; some rate them others don't see the point. For me they do show a difference in that my eye area is less puffy when I use them.


    The idea is that you miss the area that would be covered by sunglasses. This isn't just the immediate eye area (the area on the eye and the rim..etc) it's also a larger area as whatever products you use on the rest of your face can seep into the eye area far easier than people are aware. For that reason I'd suggest applying eye cream first and then the facial moisturiser so the eye cream- which often has a treatment within it (a vitamin or hyaluronic acid or similar) is first to be absorbed.


    If you are happy with what is on your list, stick to it, it's your face and your time and money! If you are having issues with it though, you can get some help here or on Makeup Alley or YouTube, both of where I have learned so much helpful pointers and advice that I've been able to cut costs and save money.
    • mania1
    • By mania1 16th Feb 18, 9:57 AM
    • 3 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    mania1
    • #9
    • 16th Feb 18, 9:57 AM
    • #9
    • 16th Feb 18, 9:57 AM
    most of the people are not very used to it I think they might not very much familiar of the process...
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