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    • lg13mza
    • By lg13mza 5th Feb 18, 2:02 PM
    • 84Posts
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    lg13mza
    Looking for hedge recommendations
    • #1
    • 5th Feb 18, 2:02 PM
    Looking for hedge recommendations 5th Feb 18 at 2:02 PM
    We've got approx. 80m of hawthorn hedge. We got the house 3 years ago and up until that point it had been neglected. But I don't want to pay for 80m of fence! So we gave it a heavy cut and we now trim it twice a year (end of may and end of august ish) and it is in much better shape. It varies from around 5ft to 8ft. I've finally got round to properly clearing all the dead wood and ivy out of it. But we've now got a lot a gaps at floor level. We'd like to plant something in the gaps, but it will need to be something that can deal with the shade, not strangle the hawthorn and maybe just fill in the bottom 2-3ft. We could of course plant more hawthorn, but ideally something that is evergreen and something to mix it up a bit. Anyone any suggestions?
Page 1
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 5th Feb 18, 2:57 PM
    • 8,155 Posts
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    andrewf75
    • #2
    • 5th Feb 18, 2:57 PM
    • #2
    • 5th Feb 18, 2:57 PM
    how about ferns?
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 5th Feb 18, 3:19 PM
    • 2,778 Posts
    • 3,124 Thanks
    glasgowdan
    • #3
    • 5th Feb 18, 3:19 PM
    • #3
    • 5th Feb 18, 3:19 PM
    Ivy over some old tree stumps placed there? Bamboo. Cotoneaster. Mahonia. Cornus. Hydrangeas.
    • unrecordings
    • By unrecordings 5th Feb 18, 4:28 PM
    • 242 Posts
    • 289 Thanks
    unrecordings
    • #4
    • 5th Feb 18, 4:28 PM
    • #4
    • 5th Feb 18, 4:28 PM
    How's about Beech ?
    • DaftyDuck
    • By DaftyDuck 5th Feb 18, 6:01 PM
    • 3,977 Posts
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    DaftyDuck
    • #5
    • 5th Feb 18, 6:01 PM
    • #5
    • 5th Feb 18, 6:01 PM
    Hawthorn is, in rural wildlife hedging, commonly planted with blackthorn (which flowers earlier than hawthorn, and on bare unleafy stems), wild roses, and holly... which fits your requirements perfectly. A little Viburnum lantana, another native, adds early autumn colour. The holly will, of course, grow larger than you prefer... if you let it! Cut it for Christmas decoration, and you'll keep it in check.

    It still makes an ideal mix in suburban environments.

    It helps the wildlife if you can leave at least some of the ivy. Of course, if you actually have got rid of it all, forever, please tell me how! it'll be back in a year.

    Mixing beech isn't as successful as one might like; to keep the foliage on over winter the beech needs to be clipped at least twice a year, and not at the ideal time to keep the hawthorn at its best. You can do it, but it's faster growing than the holly, less evergreen, and may need more individual clipping.

    Try Buckingham nurseries online for some good planting mixes .... their prices are reasonable, and they send out good plants.
    • lg13mza
    • By lg13mza 6th Feb 18, 1:55 PM
    • 84 Posts
    • 28 Thanks
    lg13mza
    • #6
    • 6th Feb 18, 1:55 PM
    • #6
    • 6th Feb 18, 1:55 PM
    Thanks all, some options to think about.


    The ivy is still there at floor level. I've just ripped out what I can from the hawthorn. I've resigned myself to having to do it periodically.
    • DaftyDuck
    • By DaftyDuck 6th Feb 18, 3:31 PM
    • 3,977 Posts
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    DaftyDuck
    • #7
    • 6th Feb 18, 3:31 PM
    • #7
    • 6th Feb 18, 3:31 PM
    You can control the ivy with glyphosate. Rather than spraying, which will broadcast the effect, let grow to 6 inches to a foot, and dunk tendril in a half-strength solution in as jam jar. Same solution can be reused for days if it's kept clean.

    Ivy is good for wildlife.... but you can have too much of a good thing
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