Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • BobbyJJK
    • By BobbyJJK 4th Feb 18, 4:47 PM
    • 7Posts
    • 0Thanks
    BobbyJJK
    Bipolar & Money
    • #1
    • 4th Feb 18, 4:47 PM
    Bipolar & Money 4th Feb 18 at 4:47 PM
    Hi, I am bipolar and suffer from a borderline personality disorder and PTSD, like most people with these conditions, I have very poor impulse control. When things are very bad, during a manic episode for example, I can dissociate and spend money on anything, sometimes I donít even open parcels when they arrive, and weeks or months later I will find items Iíve purchased that I have no recollection of, and obviously this is disastrous for my finances, and can lead to major debt problems. I just wondered if anyone else had similar problems and found a way of dealing with it, either buy not being in charge of your own finances, or therapy/medication that helped with the impulsivity. Is it ever a good idea to hand control of your finances to someone else ? Is it ever advisable to put your money in a relatives bank account, so that you donít over spend ? I would welcome any advice.
    SuperB0B :@)
Page 1
    • _shel
    • By _shel 4th Feb 18, 5:29 PM
    • 1,142 Posts
    • 1,919 Thanks
    _shel
    • #2
    • 4th Feb 18, 5:29 PM
    • #2
    • 4th Feb 18, 5:29 PM
    Hi, I am bipolar and suffer from a borderline personality disorder and PTSD, like most people with these conditions, I have very poor impulse control. When things are very bad, during a manic episode for example, I can dissociate and spend money on anything, sometimes I don!!!8217;t even open parcels when they arrive, and weeks or months later I will find items I!!!8217;ve purchased that I have no recollection of, and obviously this is disastrous for my finances, and can lead to major debt problems. I just wondered if anyone else had similar problems and found a way of dealing with it, either buy not being in charge of your own finances, or therapy/medication that helped with the impulsivity. Is it ever a good idea to hand control of your finances to someone else ? Is it ever advisable to put your money in a relatives bank account, so that you don!!!8217;t over spend ? I would welcome any advice.
    Originally posted by BobbyJJK
    Do you have a CPN or care manager? This is something they can organise, setting up an appointee and giving you spending money, making sure your bills are paid.

    But not something I!!!8217;d personally do with a relative given relationships can change and what happens if you have an argument or is that just my family!
    Last edited by _shel; 05-02-2018 at 12:47 PM.
    Thanks to everyone who posts competitions
    • BobbyJJK
    • By BobbyJJK 4th Feb 18, 7:34 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    BobbyJJK
    • #3
    • 4th Feb 18, 7:34 PM
    • #3
    • 4th Feb 18, 7:34 PM
    Iím currently waiting for a new care coordinator to be assigned, mental health services are not very good in my area. I did ask a duty worker, apparently there is an appointee service that social services or the local council provide, but thereís a waiting list for it. I have more family members that donít talk to me than do, and it really doesnít take much to annoy them, so Iím sceptical of asking family members.
    SuperB0B :@)
    • MissG80
    • By MissG80 7th Feb 18, 12:16 AM
    • 18 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    MissG80
    • #4
    • 7th Feb 18, 12:16 AM
    • #4
    • 7th Feb 18, 12:16 AM
    Hi, my brother has schizophrenia and got himself into around 7k of debt through catalogues and payday loans so I have been helping him. He was robbing peter to pay paul with pay day loans and being hounded with calls. It was only the fact that they were calling my Dad endlessly (who was then calling me) that gave me an insight into how bad his situation was. Now he is with step change thanks to the suggestion of his support worker and gentle encouragement. I can understand how hard it is to budget as he has found it hard since his benefits were changed from weekly to monthly, plus there is a lot more week for him to get through as he isn't working. I persuaded him to have all his benefits paid to me, and I now pay his DMP and other bills, divide the rest and send him a standing order twice a week. I don't mind doing it although I should have used a dormant bank account (will change it eventually) as I've still got my own finances to keep track of. We set the amounts based on a budget but it was a bit of trial and error and we had to change the days as apparently it was hard to make money last four days : ) I think he is getting into the habit of watching the pennies more now as he has stopped asking for advances. And no more pay day loans : ) It's not a permanent plan - more a solution to the current debt problem. I agree it does take a sympathetic family member. Sometimes family don't know and can be more supportive than you think if you tell them the problem and what you need help with. Maybe it could be part of an temporary emergency crisis plan i.e. when you know you are about to spiral, while you get back on track.


    I would imagine cognitive behaviour therapy would be helpful as it's good for dealing with specific problems and changing thoughts/behaviours, although it depends if they will fund it for you. Your doc can refer you.


    While helping my brother I also found out is that there is a term called 'lacking capacity'. Basically if a company knew you 'lacked capacity' to make a decision e.g. have a mental illness, but gave you credit then you might not be liable. I don't know how you this would work in practise (how would they know unless you told them?) but I did use it to get my brother out of another mobile phone contract he had defaulted on. They very kindly cancelled it, more as a good will gesture, though it was only £15 a month. I also found our that you can, I believe, have a note put on your credit file to say that you lack capacity and should not be given credit, although you'd need to check it could be removed if you wanted to.


    To be honest, half the battle is recognising it so you're more there than you think. If online shopping is your weakness, there might be some helpful threads on here on kerbing it. I found deleting all my card details saved on online sites to be helpful. Talking about is good too.


    Good luck
    • BobbyJJK
    • By BobbyJJK 19th Feb 18, 2:49 AM
    • 7 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    BobbyJJK
    • #5
    • 19th Feb 18, 2:49 AM
    • #5
    • 19th Feb 18, 2:49 AM
    I have only just seen you!!!8217;re reply, I thought I!!!8217;d get an email if I!!!8217;d had a reply, and because I didn!!!8217;t get an email I didn!!!8217;t check, so please accept my apologies for the late reply.

    Thank you so much for all the information, its really helpful, I do have a sympathetic relative who is going to help me to take control of my finances, and I am trying to access some mental health support to try and put in place some other help. I have wondered in the past whether it would be possible to have a note put on my credit file to inform lenders not to give credit, so am going to try and get that done.

    Once again, thank you for the advice.
    SuperB0B :@)
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

3,664Posts Today

9,717Users online

Martin's Twitter