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    • ST1991
    • By ST1991 1st Feb 18, 1:08 PM
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    ST1991
    Can i board up an open fireplace? New kitchn
    • #1
    • 1st Feb 18, 1:08 PM
    Can i board up an open fireplace? New kitchn 1st Feb 18 at 1:08 PM
    Hi All,

    Along with various other bits and bobs that we have been planning in our first house, we're finally getting around the planning and getting quotes for a new kitchen.
    The room doesn't have a kitchen at the moment, so planning on getting plumbing and electrics sorted ahead of time.

    The room has an open chimney fireplace (no gas or hidden boilers), which in order to get a decent run of units we may need to close off. It has an old cast iron fireplace which is beautiful, but I'm just not sure how else i would get the room to function as a kitchen without boarding it up.

    Can i board up the fireplace and put a vent in above the units to allow air to circulate still? is there anything i need to be careful of?

    I have thought about closing the fireplace and set the oven back into it, but that's not really in our price bracket, so instead i want to put the oven in the middle of the fireplace, with units either side and then into the alcoves. In this case i can leave some kind of opening/cupboard door behind the oven to access the open chimney if needs be.

    This isn't what we want, but a good example of the 'oven in the middle' i'm trying to describe.
    https://www.diy.com/departments/kitchen/fitted-kitchens/cooke-lewis-woburn-framed/cat710060.cat?icamp=kt_fk_woburn

    The room is 3.2x3.6 and has a beautifiul large low-set window looking onto the garden. We want to put a window seat in there, and have this room as a kitchen diner.
    here is the layout. bottom wall has a large radiator:

Page 1
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 1st Feb 18, 1:20 PM
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    Doozergirl
    • #2
    • 1st Feb 18, 1:20 PM
    • #2
    • 1st Feb 18, 1:20 PM
    Essentially yes.

    I!!!8217;m confused though as you don!!!8217;t want to put the oven into the fireplace but you do want to put it in the middle?
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Mutton Geoff
    • By Mutton Geoff 1st Feb 18, 1:26 PM
    • 1,106 Posts
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    Mutton Geoff
    • #3
    • 1st Feb 18, 1:26 PM
    • #3
    • 1st Feb 18, 1:26 PM
    If you put the cooker in front of the chimney breast you may have to close off the two alcoves as well, especially if they are narrow since it will be tricky to fit the units into the alcoves and around.

    You can just leave a vent for the chimney behind the cooker, no need to have easy access to it.

    I can recommend looking at DIY Kitchens, used them for several kitchens. A great range of pre assembled units, good quality and prices. Service is excellent. No connection to this firm, just a happy customer.

    Try to get your cooker hood to extract outside. Recirculating is rubbish. You could use the chimney stack for this purpose but would need to seal the fireplace off to avoid extracting back into the room.
    Compensations/Refunds from Banks & Institutions - £4,165 | Stooz Profits - £7,636 | Quidco - £4,014

    All with a big thank you to Martin and MSE.com from Mutton Geoff!
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 1st Feb 18, 1:52 PM
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    Doozergirl
    • #4
    • 1st Feb 18, 1:52 PM
    • #4
    • 1st Feb 18, 1:52 PM
    If you put the cooker in front of the chimney breast you may have to close off the two alcoves as well, especially if they are narrow since it will be tricky to fit the units into the alcoves and around.
    Originally posted by Mutton Geoff
    If that is their plan, I completely agree. I was wondering if it was but there's no logic to it.

    Opening it up and plastering it isn't the most expensive job in the world. £500 if that? I'd save up for it rather than lose a huge amount of space.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Mutton Geoff
    • By Mutton Geoff 1st Feb 18, 3:22 PM
    • 1,106 Posts
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    Mutton Geoff
    • #5
    • 1st Feb 18, 3:22 PM
    • #5
    • 1st Feb 18, 3:22 PM
    If that is their plan, I completely agree. I was wondering if it was but there's no logic to it.

    Opening it up and plastering it isn't the most expensive job in the world. £500 if that? I'd save up for it rather than lose a huge amount of space.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    It's not clear which is the longest wall since the OP gave the dimensions as 3.2 x 3.6m but the drawing is of a square room. If the fireplace is on the longer wall, then it may just be possible to excavate the fire surround to a builders opening or further to get 110cm width inside the chimney breast for the cooker to go into. The lintel could be raised then the extractor neatly built in, exhausting into the chimney. But, as you say, some extra cost, but well worth it compared to the cost of fitting out the whole kitchen.


    Something like this (copied from Pinterest)


    Last edited by Mutton Geoff; 01-02-2018 at 3:33 PM.
    Compensations/Refunds from Banks & Institutions - £4,165 | Stooz Profits - £7,636 | Quidco - £4,014

    All with a big thank you to Martin and MSE.com from Mutton Geoff!
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 1st Feb 18, 3:47 PM
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    Doozergirl
    • #6
    • 1st Feb 18, 3:47 PM
    • #6
    • 1st Feb 18, 3:47 PM
    You can do it with a less expensive (smaller) cooker too or have a regular inbuilt oven and hob and just continue the worktop in and around the opening.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • ST1991
    • By ST1991 1st Feb 18, 5:27 PM
    • 409 Posts
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    ST1991
    • #7
    • 1st Feb 18, 5:27 PM
    • #7
    • 1st Feb 18, 5:27 PM
    Yes sorry if i was't clear in my original post. The alcoves are probably a good 45cm deep so i don't want to lose that space (even if i just end up with shallower units in there).
    The longest wall is the one with the chimney breast on, so i was thinking about building the units into the alcoves and then rounded off around the chimney breast with more units/cooker there. It doesn't necessarily have to be built 'in' to the chimney breast, if that makes sense.

    I don't really want to board up the fireplace as the cast iron is beautiful and the house is very old so keeping some features would be preferable. But i don't really see how else i would fit a kitchen in this layout.

    I guess i could potentially have the dining table in-front of the window, and move the doorway so it is in the bottom left, running units along the bottom and right hand side instead...? That way we could keep the fireplace, and have a tall larder unit in the top right hand side alcove.
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 1st Feb 18, 5:43 PM
    • 4,933 Posts
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    Slinky
    • #8
    • 1st Feb 18, 5:43 PM
    • #8
    • 1st Feb 18, 5:43 PM
    Could it work better if you set the oven into one of the alcoves and then have some shallow shelfed units across where the fireplace is, essentially flattening the wall rather than having the oven sticking out into the room and the recessed cupboards in the alcoves?
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 1st Feb 18, 6:49 PM
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    Doozergirl
    • #9
    • 1st Feb 18, 6:49 PM
    • #9
    • 1st Feb 18, 6:49 PM
    Do you have a proper floorplan of the house?
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Mutton Geoff
    • By Mutton Geoff 1st Feb 18, 7:22 PM
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    Mutton Geoff
    Do you have a proper floorplan of the house?
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    Good idea. And then take that around Wren, Magnet and any other kitchen design places you can find to get ideas.
    Compensations/Refunds from Banks & Institutions - £4,165 | Stooz Profits - £7,636 | Quidco - £4,014

    All with a big thank you to Martin and MSE.com from Mutton Geoff!
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 1st Feb 18, 7:47 PM
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    Doozergirl
    Good idea. And then take that around Wren, Magnet and any other kitchen design places you can find to get ideas.
    Originally posted by Mutton Geoff
    I did mean the whole house. Well, the ground floor.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • ska lover
    • By ska lover 1st Feb 18, 8:59 PM
    • 2,642 Posts
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    ska lover
    Hi Op

    mines a bit like this
    Last edited by ska lover; 03-02-2018 at 5:57 PM.
    The opposite of what you know...is also true
    • ska lover
    • By ska lover 1st Feb 18, 9:02 PM
    • 2,642 Posts
    • 6,464 Thanks
    ska lover
    https://www.pinterest.co.uk/pin/403564816595369188/

    this is what i am trying to decribe, mine is very similar to this
    Last edited by ska lover; 01-02-2018 at 9:04 PM.
    The opposite of what you know...is also true
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 2nd Feb 18, 12:43 PM
    • 1,451 Posts
    • 2,102 Thanks
    FreeBear
    The lintel could be raised then the extractor neatly built in, exhausting into the chimney.
    Originally posted by Mutton Geoff
    Two problems with this - The gather is often a structural part of the chimney and may start as low as one metre above the floor. It could be removed and lintels installed higher up, but building control would probably be notified.

    Second problem, most (all ?) hobs/stoves require a minimum clearance to each side to allow for pan handles to be reached. Picking up a pan on the back ring when the front one is on full blast is not fun.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • ST1991
    • By ST1991 5th Feb 18, 1:04 PM
    • 409 Posts
    • 222 Thanks
    ST1991
    Hi All - my previous house listing had a detailed floorplan but i can no longer find it and the estate agent i used no longer exists..! (there are other old listings on zoopla, but none with a floorplan.

    I hope this helps:

    Dining room : 3.6 x 3.2
    Living room 3.6 x 4.4
    Utility/entrance hall: 2.9 x 1.8

    Hallway runs to the backgarden, front door is in the utility/entrance hall (which is the current kitchen...)

    • Typhoon2000
    • By Typhoon2000 5th Feb 18, 1:42 PM
    • 811 Posts
    • 386 Thanks
    Typhoon2000
    It would be nice to have the fire place as a feature. Wound you be able to use the wall by the door for the sink and hob and an Island for seating and extra work surface? You could put shallow units into the alcove.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 5th Feb 18, 1:46 PM
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    Doozergirl
    You could take out the wall and have the door at the bottom of the stairs. If that is going to be the kitchen, it is perfectly normal to have the back door in a kitchen. The hall is surplus to requirements and losing it gains you another third to the room. That would be a big gain in a small space.

    You could put shaker style cabinets arranged as a french dresser onto the wall between the two doors. A modest house will not need too many units so you could use either side of the fire and the wall that backs onto the stairs for cabinetry too.
    Last edited by Doozergirl; 05-02-2018 at 1:49 PM.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • ST1991
    • By ST1991 5th Feb 18, 2:46 PM
    • 409 Posts
    • 222 Thanks
    ST1991
    Thank-you - i'm not sure why we hadn't really thought about that as an option more.

    I don't believe it is a load bearing wall, as it looks as if the same wall as been removed in the living room (ceiling lights not aligned, 2 light switches). Plus, i think our next door neighbour has done this - i wondered why their back room was so much bigger than ours.

    That would involve removing a radiator (as there is one in the dining room, and one in that tiny hallway).

    Would we need building regs to remove the wall, or to approach an architect/surveyor first? I would be happy to put in an RSJ if needed, although not sure if it is needed as the wall is not solid stone like the external ones.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 5th Feb 18, 2:55 PM
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    Doozergirl
    It!!!8217;s always worth asking a structural engineer around to look to be sureand safe. They can charge for the visit but there would be no full calculations price to pay if no calcs are needed.

    Is there a similar wall above? Those old (terraced?) houses were usually two open rooms, no hallways, in my experience. Partition walls were pretty much always made of brick as well.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • ST1991
    • By ST1991 5th Feb 18, 3:16 PM
    • 409 Posts
    • 222 Thanks
    ST1991
    Well, on the plus side that means we won't have to decorate the hallway...

    There are no other similar walls in the house, although it looks like there used to be a similar one in the living room.
    Upstairs there are just 2 rooms - one either side of the stairs - with a stud wall separating off the bathroom.
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