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    • bouicca21
    • By bouicca21 1st Feb 18, 11:41 AM
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    bouicca21
    Proper old style! Living on WW2 rations
    • #1
    • 1st Feb 18, 11:41 AM
    Proper old style! Living on WW2 rations 1st Feb 18 at 11:41 AM
    The initial problem is that there is no such thing as a definitive list of rations. There was also a points system which is even harder to track down. And of course even if something was theoretically available on the ratio/points system, shortages meant that it wasn't necessarily available in the shops.

    But I am nothing if not determined and the idea isn't to impose hardship on myself but to live frugally and healthily.

    I managed to find a list of rations and points as of 1 December 1942. So:
    .
    4 oz Bacons and ham
    8oz sugar
    6 oz butter and margarine of which not more than 2 oz to be butter
    2 oz cooking fat
    2 oz tea
    12 old pence of meat (I reckon this is about £2.50 at today's values)
    8oz cheese (vegetarians, certain categories of workers in E agricultural workers and miners, sufferers from diabetes mellitus or pituitary diabetes got 16 oz)
    4 oz Jam, marmalade, syrup, mincemeat or treacle
    3 oz sweets and chocolate

    Points per 1 lb of
    1 plain biscuits; 2 sweet biscuits; 4 chocolate biscuits
    16 dried fruit
    4 prunes
    8 syrup
    32 grade 1 or 2 Canned salmon; 16 for grade 3
    12 canned herrings in tomato sauce; ditto for pilchards in tomTo sauce
    8 canned pilchards in brine
    4 sago, rice etc
    4 cereal
    8 Tinned sweetened milk
    6 medium tin tomatoes
    8 large tin tomatoes
    4 tin Beans in tomato sauce
    1 tin beans in brine
    Bread not rationed. Nor is offal or fresh fish, fresh fruit.

    Additionally I think everyone got the equivalent of 4 pints of milk (1 pint fresh, 3 dried) and 4 eggs (also 1 fresh and 3 dried) a week.

    Somewhere in the net it says it was 16 points a week.

    People complained about being forced to use wheatmeal flour and eat wheatmeal bread, but the interesting thing about this list is that, given no shortages, it is actually quite easy. Obviously you have to have some vegetarian/vegan meals regularly. No problem about getting your 5 a day! Dried pulses were either ration free or 8 points for 1 lb (not sure which). In the spirit rather than the letter of the system, I'm happily substituting puy lentils for the orange ones that were the only lentils my mother knew of.

    I've done a month. Saved lots of money! Aim to do it for February too and there are some dishes, like vegetable and lentil shepherds pie that will stay in my repertoire, long after the self imposed WW2 challenge is over.
Page 3
    • bouicca21
    • By bouicca21 4th Feb 18, 11:49 AM
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    bouicca21
    Stretching the butter with oil must be what those spreadable butters are. However in terms of rations, it won't work because the oil would have to come from the cooking fat allowance!

    I think the lesson for me is that I just eat too much butter and that I need to learn healthier habits. I thought the worst part of the diet would be the lack of meat but cooking tasty meatless dishes has been no problem. Whether to blow the best part of the egg and butter ration to assuage my sudden lust for lemon drizzle cake is a whole other matter. Coffee and cake at a local cafe might be the answer.

    PS Caronc, I do hope you are feeling better.
    • caronc
    • By caronc 4th Feb 18, 12:10 PM
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    caronc
    Stretching the butter with oil must be what those spreadable butters are. However in terms of rations, it won't work because the oil would have to come from the cooking fat allowance!

    I think the lesson for me is that I just eat too much butter and that I need to learn healthier habits. I thought the worst part of the diet would be the lack of meat but cooking tasty meatless dishes has been no problem. Whether to blow the best part of the egg and butter ration to assuage my sudden lust for lemon drizzle cake is a whole other matter. Coffee and cake at a local cafe might be the answer.

    PS Caronc, I do hope you are feeling better.
    Originally posted by bouicca21
    Thanks I'm getting there I think
    PS- Is there such a thing as too much butter in one's life ?
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    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 4th Feb 18, 12:46 PM
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    suki1964
    Stretching the butter with oil must be what those spreadable butters are. However in terms of rations, it won't work because the oil would have to come from the cooking fat allowance!

    I think the lesson for me is that I just eat too much butter and that I need to learn healthier habits. I thought the worst part of the diet would be the lack of meat but cooking tasty meatless dishes has been no problem. Whether to blow the best part of the egg and butter ration to assuage my sudden lust for lemon drizzle cake is a whole other matter. Coffee and cake at a local cafe might be the answer.

    PS Caronc, I do hope you are feeling better.
    Originally posted by bouicca21
    Butter is much healthier for you then margarine

    I'd rather have plain bread then use margerine
    if you lend someone £20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 4th Feb 18, 4:32 PM
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    Owain Moneysaver
    This site and the recipes thereon may be of relevance

    https://the1940sexperiment.com/100-wartime-recipes/
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
    • monnagran
    • By monnagran 4th Feb 18, 4:38 PM
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    monnagran
    bouicca, you are absolutely right, I think that the loss of fats affected people even more than the loss of meat and sugar.

    I remember when I was at Primary School a regiment of Canadians stationed near-by made a gift to the children in the school of spam and lard. To make it a fair distribution we were all to dip into a box and take out a slip of folded paper which either said 'spam' or 'lard' and we would be given a small package of whatever we had won.
    I left for school that afternoon with my mother's words ringing in my ears, "Dip for lard, please dip for lard."
    Unusually for me the fates were kind and I did get the lard. I have never been more proud and my mother had never been more grateful.
    Looking back it seems an odd thing to give to schoolchildren but it was just before D-day, so perhaps they were clearing the stocks before they moved out.
    I believe that friends are quiet angels
    Who lift us to our feet when our wings
    Have trouble remembering how to fly.
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 4th Feb 18, 4:43 PM
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    Owain Moneysaver
    Coffee and cake at a local cafe might be the answer.
    Originally posted by bouicca21
    You can have a rock bun with half a currant in it.

    No lemons in wartime.
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
    • monnagran
    • By monnagran 4th Feb 18, 5:03 PM
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    monnagran
    You can have a rock bun with half a currant in it.

    No lemons in wartime.
    Originally posted by Owain Moneysaver
    No coffee either, unless you had a fancy for Bev or Camp.
    I believe that friends are quiet angels
    Who lift us to our feet when our wings
    Have trouble remembering how to fly.
    • THIRZAH
    • By THIRZAH 4th Feb 18, 5:12 PM
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    THIRZAH
    Well into the 1960s my mother had a "dripping jar" into which she emptied any fat . She never bought fat for cooking except marge and lard for baking.
    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 4th Feb 18, 5:15 PM
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    suki1964
    No coffee either, unless you had a fancy for Bev or Camp.
    Originally posted by monnagran

    Omg I loved camp coffee as a nipper, it was the only ‘coffee’ my nan ever had. Every day at 11, Mrs Williams from upstairs would come down, nan would take her house coat off and put a tablecloth over the oil cloth on the table and we would all sit at the table and drink coffee. It was always made with milk and I remember Mrs Williams sat there in her hat and coat, drinking the coffee from the saucer
    if you lend someone £20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it
    • bouicca21
    • By bouicca21 4th Feb 18, 5:26 PM
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    bouicca21
    In my imaginary world there are no shortages so I can have lemons and coffee (and wine).

    They used to advertise Camp coffee on Radio Luxembourg. I bought some, and omg was it disgusting.
    • caronc
    • By caronc 4th Feb 18, 5:33 PM
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    caronc
    Well into the 1960s my mother had a "dripping jar" into which she emptied any fat . She never bought fat for cooking except marge and lard for baking.
    Originally posted by THIRZAH
    I still have one , though not for cooking, I save up any hard fat and every so often use it to make fat balls for the birds
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    • JackieO
    • By JackieO 4th Feb 18, 10:45 PM
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    JackieO
    I had a dripping jar for years when my children were small, and my late OH used to delve into the bottom to get the jellied bits out which he spread on thick slices of brown bread which were then salt and peppered he absolutely loved it.

    There used to be a country pub in Kent that we would drive to on a cold winter's Saturday night. The landlords 'special' was thick slices of HM toasted bread and dripping which he would devour while we sat in front of the open fire.To him it was heaven on earth

    I remember camp coffee and I have drunk it reluctantly, but its not too bad if you use it in cakes as a flavouring.

    As I no longer eat bread, I rarely eat butter either I use it in block form for shortbread on baking. I only eat crispbread or rice cakes and use cream cheese as a spread instead of butter. Years ago there used to be a margarine called Summer County which claimed to have 10% butter, but to me it still tasted of marg.

    Definitely no bread,butter AND jam, it was always one or t'other never both

    My DD has Flora buttery which she swears tastes the same as butter.
    Quot Libros,Quam Breve Tempus.
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    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 5th Feb 18, 12:49 AM
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    suki1964
    I still have one , though not for cooking, I save up any hard fat and every so often use it to make fat balls for the birds
    Originally posted by caronc
    I have one as well. Mines because we have a septic tank. The soak away on that gets blocked and it's bloody messy sorting it out
    if you lend someone £20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it
    • tessie bear
    • By tessie bear 5th Feb 18, 12:54 PM
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    tessie bear
    such an interesting thread love the war time cook books I have a few of margerites if that's how you spell it....I was reading a blog earlier with someone who claims to be giving living on rations ago that said she seems to be twisting it to suit so much I'm sure at the end it will be declared the best thing ever ...as I understand it you got what you could in wartime and made the best of it xxx

    love the lard v spam tale....I think I would have had the day off sick
    on the brink...
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 5th Feb 18, 6:36 PM
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    mardatha
    Another one loving this thread, thank you for starting it
    I hate cooking and am useless at it, but when MrsLurcherwalker introduced me to the joys of wartime cookbooks, things got a lot better. I can actually turn out food that tastes like food, using these books. And it's food that we recognise, not strange weird things that I neither know nor ever want to
    I have a few books written during the war, Nella Last of course but also a fabulous book called "Bettys Wartime Diary" (I think).She lived in a very rural part of England and wow, the food they ate made my teeth water! Game pie, pheasants by the dozen, fish by the bucketload. Obviously some good poachers in her village
    I can't add anything to the discussion as I'm not a good cook or quite old enough to remember rationing, but I am following with interest.
    • sillyvixen
    • By sillyvixen 5th Feb 18, 11:45 PM
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    sillyvixen
    My mum had a dripping bowl, in a Pyrex bowl, my nan had a matching Pyrex bowl. I never remember my doing anything with the dripping, but when nan visited she would take the dripping bowl and leave the empty one in its place.
    Dogs return to eat their vomit, just as fools repeat their foolishness. There is no more hope for a fool than for someone who says, "i am really clever!"
    • YorksLass
    • By YorksLass 6th Feb 18, 6:17 PM
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    YorksLass
    I remember Camp coffee from my childhood in the 50s (there was always a bottle in the pantry) but I don't think we ever used it as a drink - I recall it had a rather bitter taste to it . DM and DGM using it in baking to flavour cakes and it was fine for that. I think it was a blend of water, sugar, chicory essence and a little (very little) bit of coffee essence and it's still available in some sms for those who have a yearning for it.

    Ah, fond memories of the dripping bowl, especially if it was pork dripping to spread on bread or toast. We can't manage the pork crackling so well nowadays but still enjoy the dripping.

    Another vote here for the half lard/half marg for pastry.

    A definite No to cod liver oil but used to love the malt extract & cod liver oil in the big brown glass jars. A daily tablespoon either on its own or spread on bread/toast was supposed to be good for children. Lucky I liked it!
    Be kind to others and to yourself too. Life has its ups and downs, use the ups to overcome the downs!

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    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 6th Feb 18, 8:43 PM
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    mardatha
    Husband still drools over the memory of malt on a spoon, can't have it now as diabetic. I liked Camp coffee. Is it still possible nowadays to save proper dripping in a bowl? I remember the taste of chops fried in it and they taste nothing like that now..
    • caronc
    • By caronc 6th Feb 18, 9:12 PM
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    caronc
    I remember the taste of chops fried in it and they taste nothing like that now..
    Originally posted by mardatha
    I don't see why not - I have a stash of "hard fat" that I use for the birds but also one (in a lidded "tupperware") of duck fat that I save for roast spuds. Keeps for ages & ages...... (in the fridge though not tried it just in a covered bowl on the counter)
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    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 6th Feb 18, 10:10 PM
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    suki1964
    Along with the spoon of malt and cod liver oil, was the spoonful of Rose hip syrup. Oh I loved that

    Then Ribena came along and it was a glass of that every morning, hot in the winter, cold in the summer

    Another spoonful that was dished out was Syrup of Figs if you hadn't been to the loo for a few days. I must be weird because I loved that
    if you lend someone £20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it
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