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  • FIRST POST
    • hoohum
    • By hoohum 13th Jan 18, 5:20 PM
    • 2Posts
    • 0Thanks
    hoohum
    Holiday Park Investment Or Not. What To Do With £70,000
    • #1
    • 13th Jan 18, 5:20 PM
    Holiday Park Investment Or Not. What To Do With £70,000 13th Jan 18 at 5:20 PM
    I have £70,000 to invest. I don’t want a property with a mortgage. I don’t want to gamble on stocks and shares. I have been shown a North Devon Holiday Park scheme that would give me a 250 year lease on a single unit in an all inclusive park with a 10 year agreement and a bi annual payment resulting in 10% for the first 5 years and 12% for the second 5 years. This sounds all very good but there’s no guarantee I could sell this at the end of the 10 years or that I’d get a further favourable deal afterwards. It has been suggested that it’s best to sell after 5 years for a small profit that would allow buyers to get 10% on the second 5 years. Has anyone reading this had any experience of being able to sell a similar investment, or has any advice about this type of investment, or has other suggestions for investing this sum?
Page 1
    • molerat
    • By molerat 13th Jan 18, 5:22 PM
    • 17,682 Posts
    • 11,943 Thanks
    molerat
    • #2
    • 13th Jan 18, 5:22 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Jan 18, 5:22 PM
    The terms "Holiday Park" and "Investment" do not go together. Just do some research then run a mile.
    www.helpforheroes.org.uk/donations.html
    • Katiehound
    • By Katiehound 13th Jan 18, 5:29 PM
    • 4,037 Posts
    • 38,273 Thanks
    Katiehound
    • #3
    • 13th Jan 18, 5:29 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Jan 18, 5:29 PM
    Me? I'd be 'gambling' with stocks & shares ISAs invested via an independent financial advisor- building the investment up to the max each financial year.
    Being polite and pleasant doesn't cost anything!
    If you found my posting helpful please hit the "Thanks" button!
    Many thanks

    2018 Wombling .... Entrant 8 ... 470 More
    • TBC15
    • By TBC15 13th Jan 18, 5:31 PM
    • 319 Posts
    • 123 Thanks
    TBC15
    • #4
    • 13th Jan 18, 5:31 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Jan 18, 5:31 PM
    Bitcoin has less chance in ending in tears. ( No don’t buy Bitcoin)

    If this investment is so good why are they sharing it with the world?
    Last edited by TBC15; 13-01-2018 at 5:33 PM.
    • Thrugelmir
    • By Thrugelmir 13th Jan 18, 5:35 PM
    • 56,725 Posts
    • 50,102 Thanks
    Thrugelmir
    • #5
    • 13th Jan 18, 5:35 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Jan 18, 5:35 PM
    Buy a caravan or motorhome instead.
    ďOpportunities come infrequently. When it rains gold, put out the bucket, not the thimbleĒ
    ― Warren Buffett
    • badger09
    • By badger09 13th Jan 18, 5:36 PM
    • 5,589 Posts
    • 5,034 Thanks
    badger09
    • #6
    • 13th Jan 18, 5:36 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Jan 18, 5:36 PM
    The terms "Holiday Park" and "Investment" do not go together. Just do some research then run a mile.
    Originally posted by molerat
    Or save yourself some time and skip the research
    • ColdIron
    • By ColdIron 13th Jan 18, 5:46 PM
    • 3,744 Posts
    • 4,574 Thanks
    ColdIron
    • #7
    • 13th Jan 18, 5:46 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Jan 18, 5:46 PM
    These things are very illiquid, unregulated and have little consumer protection amongst a host of other problems

    This thread might be worth a read

    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?p=66851427&highlight=dream#post6685 1427
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 13th Jan 18, 5:56 PM
    • 7,901 Posts
    • 8,496 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    • #8
    • 13th Jan 18, 5:56 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Jan 18, 5:56 PM
    I have £70,000 to invest. I don’t want a property with a mortgage. I don’t want to gamble on stocks and shares. ........ Has anyone reading this had any experience of being able to sell a similar investment, or has any advice about this type of investment, or has other suggestions for investing this sum?
    Originally posted by hoohum
    I do gamble on stocks and shares. I've gambled big, lost and made a lot of money. Lost amounts in excess of 6 figures (and luckily made more than that back). Ive just invested five figures into a Chinese company very few here will have heard of.

    On a risk scale of 1-10 I was a 10 when earning, maybe an 8 now. When we had a free pensions consultation at work I showed the adviser my investments and pointed out one fund that was where i had about 50% of my investments" - Thats my cautious allocation" I said - "hmmm" he said,"thats where we advise our high risk clients to put their highest risk allocation"

    And the point of that preamble is, I wouldn't touch a holiday park "investment scam plan" with two extra long gold plated bargepoles.

    You say you dont like risky things likes stocks and shares yet are contemplating taking on something that's beyond risk into "bye bye money" and putting 100% of your investment in it something i would never do even in my most stupid investment moments.

    At least you had the sense to post here first.

    EDIT UPDATE; The first questions to be answered regards more sensible suggestions is what the general plan is for this money. Whats the point of investing it? Income? Do you want to retain the capital? Would you be distraught if your investment dropped by 25% or sanguine? 50%? Do you want to retain the money long term or burn it down over a period of years?
    Last edited by AnotherJoe; 13-01-2018 at 6:03 PM.
    • ChesterDog
    • By ChesterDog 13th Jan 18, 6:00 PM
    • 818 Posts
    • 1,498 Thanks
    ChesterDog
    • #9
    • 13th Jan 18, 6:00 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Jan 18, 6:00 PM
    This sort of thing looks much safer to me, given a decent timescale.

    I am one of the "Dogs of the Index".
    • Eco Miser
    • By Eco Miser 13th Jan 18, 6:01 PM
    • 3,320 Posts
    • 3,083 Thanks
    Eco Miser
    I have £70,000 to invest. I donít want a property with a mortgage. I donít want to gamble on stocks and shares. I have been shown a North Devon Holiday Park scheme that would give me a 250 year lease on a single unit in an all inclusive park with a 10 year agreement and a bi annual payment resulting in 10% for the first 5 years and 12% for the second 5 years.
    Originally posted by hoohum
    In order of risk, highest first:
    • lease on a single unit in an all inclusive park
    • property with a mortgage
    • balanced fund of stocks and shares and bonds.
    Among other problems, you are relying on the park managers to let your unit in preference to others, maybe their own, when demand is low.
    Eco Miser
    Saving money for well over half a century
    • ChesterDog
    • By ChesterDog 13th Jan 18, 6:01 PM
    • 818 Posts
    • 1,498 Thanks
    ChesterDog
    Or...

    I am one of the "Dogs of the Index".
    • crv1963
    • By crv1963 13th Jan 18, 6:16 PM
    • 192 Posts
    • 504 Thanks
    crv1963
    Do not risk the money with a Holiday Park! Lots of places even if it is not a scam demand that you replace the unit/ static caravan with a new one after 10 years.


    Even if you don't lose your 70k straight away are you tied to replace it in ten years? Or scrap it a your own cost if you don't want to/ can't afford to replace it?


    Read, research and if still not confident what to invest in see an IFA!
    CRV1963- Light bulb moment Sept 15- Planning the great escape- aka retirement!
    • jamei305
    • By jamei305 13th Jan 18, 6:37 PM
    • 273 Posts
    • 327 Thanks
    jamei305
    Holiday park investments are to be avoided, unless you can buy a whole holiday park and convince other people to rent small bits of land from you at exorbitant prices.
    • BananaRepublic
    • By BananaRepublic 14th Jan 18, 12:44 AM
    • 1,052 Posts
    • 774 Thanks
    BananaRepublic
    Your post shows extreme ignorance of investments, especially equities. I don’t say this to be unpleasant, or to put you down, but to make you aware of that fact. I think most people are in the same boat. What you really need to do is get a good book on investing, and understand the basics, so you understand a bit about risk, inflation, compound interest, time in the market and so on. After all, we (almost) all have pensions to look after.

    And if an investment suggests a sure fire 10% a year return and your original investment back after ten years, run a mile.
    • TBC15
    • By TBC15 14th Jan 18, 12:47 AM
    • 319 Posts
    • 123 Thanks
    TBC15
    This sort of thing looks much safer to me, given a decent timescale.

    Originally posted by ChesterDog
    Love graphs. So, is it telling me if I invested £0 in the FTSE All Share with dividend reinvested back in 1987 it could now be worth over £140000?

    Come to think about it I did invest £0 back then, where do I pick my money up?
    • ChesterDog
    • By ChesterDog 14th Jan 18, 8:31 AM
    • 818 Posts
    • 1,498 Thanks
    ChesterDog
    Love graphs. So, is it telling me if I invested £0 in the FTSE All Share with dividend reinvested back in 1987 it could now be worth over £140000?

    Come to think about it I did invest £0 back then, where do I pick my money up?
    Originally posted by TBC15
    Yes - rather amusing that starting point, isn't it?

    I think someone at Fidelity extrapolated back a tiny bit too far.
    I am one of the "Dogs of the Index".
    • Apodemus
    • By Apodemus 14th Jan 18, 8:43 AM
    • 967 Posts
    • 784 Thanks
    Apodemus
    Love graphs. So, is it telling me if I invested £0 in the FTSE All Share with dividend reinvested back in 1987 it could now be worth over £140000?

    Come to think about it I did invest £0 back then, where do I pick my money up?
    Originally posted by TBC15
    To be fair, £0 invested in the FTSE All Share in 1987, is probably still worth more after 30 years than £70,000 invested today in a holiday Park will be worth in 2048!
    • KeepOnKnitting
    • By KeepOnKnitting 14th Jan 18, 8:51 AM
    • 145 Posts
    • 176 Thanks
    KeepOnKnitting
    A caravan is not an investment. It is a liability. Liable to need repairs, to get trashed by holiday makers, to get damaged in storms, to need replacing because it is dated. Just get a Sun £9.50 holiday if you fancy a caravan.
    Save £12k in 2018 #62
    • jamei305
    • By jamei305 14th Jan 18, 9:22 AM
    • 273 Posts
    • 327 Thanks
    jamei305
    Yes - rather amusing that starting point, isn't it?

    I think someone at Fidelity extrapolated back a tiny bit too far.
    Originally posted by ChesterDog
    The graph is based on starting with £0 and investing a certain amount per month, rather than starting with £x and leaving it alone.
    • firestone
    • By firestone 14th Jan 18, 9:33 AM
    • 108 Posts
    • 40 Thanks
    firestone
    I notice you say there is no guarantee that you will be able to sell in 10 years but you seem sure you can sell in 5 years - why? You say if you get a buyer they can make 10% for the 2nd 5 years,as you quote 12% for the second 5 years at the start does that mean they buy 5 or 10 years?It is early on a Sunday and my brains not in gear but you say a payment result of 10% for 5 years are you saying that's per year or a total gain?
    Have no idea about this type of plan but you only mention bi-annual payments so is it up to you to rent out? Also your thread title says investment not holiday home so is there ground rent/maintenance/site fees/utilities/insurance/council tax and other bills before you make money but that would be different if it was for holidays and lots of weekends for you
    Last edited by firestone; 14-01-2018 at 9:50 AM.
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