Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Rambles2814
    • By Rambles2814 9th Jan 18, 11:50 PM
    • 5Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Rambles2814
    Advice about Enhanced DBS, Univeristy and Social Work
    • #1
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:50 PM
    Advice about Enhanced DBS, Univeristy and Social Work 9th Jan 18 at 11:50 PM
    Hello,

    I'm seeking advise. I got some conditional offers for a BA Social Work course but I've been very very stupid with my disicisons lately and I've managed to get a caution for fraud. I mistakenly used a friend's card believing it was my own (we have the same bank and I didn't check name just used contactless). Police have given me a caution. Would I still get in to do my BA Social Work course or would they refuse me?

    Thanks
Page 2
    • PersianCatLady
    • By PersianCatLady 11th Jan 18, 5:46 AM
    • 421 Posts
    • 387 Thanks
    PersianCatLady
    I unfortunately haven't paid her back, I have tried to ring and message her but she won't reply and has deleted me off social media.

    I've been advised not to keep pestering her as this could make the case worse. If I had her bank details I would happily transfer it. I would personally go to her house but I feel like that might cause more hassle
    Originally posted by Rambles2814
    Why can't you send her a cheque to repay her?
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 11th Jan 18, 8:51 AM
    • 37,944 Posts
    • 34,408 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    I unfortunately haven't paid her back, I have tried to ring and message her but she won't reply and has deleted me off social media.

    I've been advised not to keep pestering her as this could make the case worse. If I had her bank details I would happily transfer it. I would personally go to her house but I feel like that might cause more hassle
    Originally posted by Rambles2814
    Even if you do not have a cheque book, would your bank send one to you? (I know not all accounts offer this service on all accounts.)

    And if not, can you not get a cheque raised at the bank and post it to her? No need to go into details: you can just say you need to get some money to someone and you don't have their bank details.

    Actually - and this one costs a bit more - you can still buy postal orders at the Post Office. There, you get no proof that she's paid it in, so would be my least preferred method.

    BTW, you described her as a 'friend'. This is not the way a friend behaves.

    How much are we talking about?
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 2 shawls, 3 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 1 seaman's hat ...
    Current projects: 1 shawl, another seaman's hat
    • marlot
    • By marlot 11th Jan 18, 9:44 AM
    • 3,216 Posts
    • 2,340 Thanks
    marlot
    Ermmm.... You used the card once, but then again you used it several times, and it was totally accidental because you have several cards which I assume are yours but you happened to have her card (how? Not even my best friend has my card!!!)

    The hole you are digging is bigger. It started out unbelievable and has ended up on another planet. They won't believe any of this - even I am thinking that you are not a suitable person to be working with vulnerable people, and that's based on your version of the story.
    Originally posted by sangie595
    I lead safeguarding for a charity, and I agree.

    If this caution came up on your record, there is no way that I'd be letting you near vulnerable adults.

    Sorry to be blunt.
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 11th Jan 18, 9:58 AM
    • 1,845 Posts
    • 1,670 Thanks
    Comms69
    Ok.


    1: the OP knows where this friend lives, unless I've misunderstood the story regarding how she got the card. Post the money through
    2: the OP knows where friend works. Drop it off there.


    That's the advice if the story is true. However here goes.


    This all sounds too rehearsed. Reason upon reason of how and why. I suspect 9/10, should such a thing happen, the conversation would be this:


    OP: Hi friend, just realised I picked up your card by mistake after last Friday/x night out. I can drop it off for you or leave it at work.
    Friend: oh thanks, hadn't even realised.
    OP: By the way I sometimes use contactless payments, can you check your bank and let me know if I used your card by mistake, i'll transfer / drop off the money for you
    Friend: No worries, I'll check and let you know. thanks for telling me.


    Somehow two people who work in the same place, go out on nights out and stay at each other's homes end up falling out so badly over a few transactions that one of them calls the police? and the other doesn't return the money straight away?


    Just doesn't sound right. If the OP is telling the truth, they've had all the advice they need. If they're lying it will come out and they will lose the course and the career.


    I don't think someone intervening in the lives of vulnerable people, making life changing decisions and potentially taking legal action should struggle so much with such basic concepts or the 'right thing to do'
    • Manxman in exile
    • By Manxman in exile 11th Jan 18, 11:21 AM
    • 1,127 Posts
    • 768 Thanks
    Manxman in exile
    I lead safeguarding for a charity, and I agree.

    If this caution came up on your record, there is no way that I'd be letting you near vulnerable adults.

    Sorry to be blunt.
    Originally posted by marlot

    I agree. I worked for a mental health NHS trust which was one of the first to have social workers TUPE'd over to them. The OP does not appear to be a suitable person to take on SW duties.
    • Manxman in exile
    • By Manxman in exile 11th Jan 18, 11:27 AM
    • 1,127 Posts
    • 768 Thanks
    Manxman in exile
    Being picky now, but if you're going to do a degree you might want to start using correct English instead of made up words such as "she crimed it."
    Originally posted by elsien

    That's not picky at all - it's a valid point!
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

4,306Posts Today

9,819Users online

Martin's Twitter