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    • UKSBD
    • By UKSBD 9th Jan 18, 5:17 PM
    • 479Posts
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    UKSBD
    paying for course when dropping out
    • #1
    • 9th Jan 18, 5:17 PM
    paying for course when dropping out 9th Jan 18 at 5:17 PM
    My daughter started a foundation degree course in September.


    She can't cope and wants to drop out.


    The course cost her £7700 which I believe she will have to pay in full (student loan has currently paid 1st term)


    If she drops out I believe her student loan will stop - how can she pay for the course?


    Is there anyway she can still receive her student loan even if dropping out of course?


    There must be lots of people who drop out of courses early, what do they do?
Page 1
    • Ed-1
    • By Ed-1 9th Jan 18, 5:33 PM
    • 1,997 Posts
    • 1,112 Thanks
    Ed-1
    • #2
    • 9th Jan 18, 5:33 PM
    • #2
    • 9th Jan 18, 5:33 PM
    My daughter started a foundation degree course in September.


    She can't cope and wants to drop out.


    The course cost her £7700 which I believe she will have to pay in full (student loan has currently paid 1st term)


    If she drops out I believe her student loan will stop - how can she pay for the course?


    Is there anyway she can still receive her student loan even if dropping out of course?


    There must be lots of people who drop out of courses early, what do they do?
    Originally posted by UKSBD
    The university can only charge 25% of the tuition fee to someone who doesn't get past the 1st term, 50% to someone who doesn't get past the 2nd term, and 100% to someone who attends the 3rd term. The tuition fee loan entitlement matches this.
    • UKSBD
    • By UKSBD 9th Jan 18, 5:39 PM
    • 479 Posts
    • 149 Thanks
    UKSBD
    • #3
    • 9th Jan 18, 5:39 PM
    • #3
    • 9th Jan 18, 5:39 PM
    The university can only charge 25% of the tuition fee to someone who doesn't get past the 1st term, 50% to someone who doesn't get past the 2nd term, and 100% to someone who attends the 3rd term. The tuition fee loan entitlement matches this.
    Originally posted by Ed-1



    thanks, does that apply to colleges too?


    I spoke to her lecturer today and he was under the impression she would have to pay the whole year.


    I've asked her to find any contract she signed with the college but she thinks she handed it in and doesn't have a copy.
    • Ed-1
    • By Ed-1 9th Jan 18, 5:48 PM
    • 1,997 Posts
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    Ed-1
    • #4
    • 9th Jan 18, 5:48 PM
    • #4
    • 9th Jan 18, 5:48 PM
    thanks, does that apply to colleges too?


    I spoke to her lecturer today and he was under the impression she would have to pay the whole year.


    I've asked her to find any contract she signed with the college but she thinks she handed it in and doesn't have a copy.
    Originally posted by UKSBD
    Yes as it's a higher education course. The university can't charge a fee in excess of the tuition fee loan entitlement.
    • UKSBD
    • By UKSBD 9th Jan 18, 6:06 PM
    • 479 Posts
    • 149 Thanks
    UKSBD
    • #5
    • 9th Jan 18, 6:06 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Jan 18, 6:06 PM
    Yes as it's a higher education course. The university can't charge a fee in excess of the tuition fee loan entitlement.
    Originally posted by Ed-1

    thanks again


    So in theory she won't have to pay any more than what she receives in Student Loan?


    She hasn't gone back this term (doesn't start until later this week) and her student loan isn't due to be paid to college until 7th February.


    As she told college today and if she can cancel the student loan before they make payment will she get away with only having to pay for 1st term?
    • Ed-1
    • By Ed-1 9th Jan 18, 6:58 PM
    • 1,997 Posts
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    Ed-1
    • #6
    • 9th Jan 18, 6:58 PM
    • #6
    • 9th Jan 18, 6:58 PM
    thanks again


    So in theory she won't have to pay any more than what she receives in Student Loan?


    She hasn't gone back this term (doesn't start until later this week) and her student loan isn't due to be paid to college until 7th February.


    As she told college today and if she can cancel the student loan before they make payment will she get away with only having to pay for 1st term?
    Originally posted by UKSBD
    It's the official withdrawal date that counts.

    She needs to make sure that the college has confirmed her withdrawal date with Student Finance as before the 2nd term starts.

    Any maintenance loan entitlement will be reassessed. She's entitled to 1/365th of her full entitlement for every day she attended since 1st September (the start of the official academic year) to her withdrawal date.
    • UKSBD
    • By UKSBD 9th Jan 18, 7:23 PM
    • 479 Posts
    • 149 Thanks
    UKSBD
    • #7
    • 9th Jan 18, 7:23 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Jan 18, 7:23 PM
    It's the official withdrawal date that counts.

    She needs to make sure that the college has confirmed her withdrawal date with Student Finance as before the 2nd term starts.
    Originally posted by Ed-1

    Looks like she is too late then and will have to pay for the 2nd term too


    Will the student loan company still pay for this and put it on her student loan or will she be expected to pay it herself?



    Any maintenance loan entitlement will be reassessed. She's entitled to 1/365th of her full entitlement for every day she attended since 1st September (the start of the official academic year) to her withdrawal date.
    Originally posted by Ed-1

    Yes, she has her maintenance loan put to one side so will be able to pay whatever she needs to pay back of that.


    When you say "every day" does it mean every day in a 7 day week or do they just add up the days she was there (it was only a 3 day course)
    • Ed-1
    • By Ed-1 9th Jan 18, 7:38 PM
    • 1,997 Posts
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    Ed-1
    • #8
    • 9th Jan 18, 7:38 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Jan 18, 7:38 PM
    Looks like she is too late then and will have to pay for the 2nd term too


    Will the student loan company still pay for this and put it on her student loan or will she be expected to pay it herself?






    Yes, she has her maintenance loan put to one side so will be able to pay whatever she needs to pay back of that.


    When you say "every day" does it mean every day in a 7 day week or do they just add up the days she was there (it was only a 3 day course)
    Originally posted by UKSBD
    Every calendar day (of a 7 day week).

    She should be able to negotiate with the college to register her official withdrawal date as before the 2nd term started if she informed them before it started. Even if she informed them after it started, they could still only charge her 25% of the full tuition fee if they're nice. Whatever they charge, if the official withdrawal date is after the 2nd term started then she's entitled to 50% of the tuition fee loan to pay for it if they charge 50% (which wouldn't be very reasonable if she hasn't actually started the 2nd term).
    • UKSBD
    • By UKSBD 10th Jan 18, 11:19 AM
    • 479 Posts
    • 149 Thanks
    UKSBD
    • #9
    • 10th Jan 18, 11:19 AM
    • #9
    • 10th Jan 18, 11:19 AM
    We went in to the college this morning and spoke to her lecturer.
    He was saying she would have to pay at least 75% of the course and trying to persuade her to continue.


    Once he realised she was adamant she wanted to quit though he sent us to student finances and they were very much more friendly and helpful.


    As my daughter hadn't started this term and they hadn't processed her 2nd student loan instalment the lady in student finances said she will cancel everything and my daughter only has to pay the 25% that her student loan has already covered.


    Big relief all-round, finance wise and also seeing how much instant relief my daughter got for having things sorted, it was like a big pressure instantly lifted from her shoulders.


    Quite annoyed really on how much pressure her previous college put on her to take the course, she felt pressurised in to doing it from day one.
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